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dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, Scott
dc.contributor.authorHill, Alexandra
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-21T23:57:28Z
dc.date.available2021-07-21T23:57:28Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12066
dc.description.abstractPassage of the tax cap would result in a substantial shift in purchasing power away from local government toward households, the federal government, state government, certain businesses, and non-residents. It would reduce the cost of owning property and impact the price of real estate. It would change the way local government finances public services. It would change the quality of life. Whether one views these economic changes as positive or negative depends on them perspective of the viewer. Clearly the tax cap would have far reaching economic effects that should be carefully considered before deciding whether it would be good or bad for the economy.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska.en_US
dc.subjectreal estateen_US
dc.subjectjobsen_US
dc.subjectlong-term economic effectsen_US
dc.subjecttaxationen_US
dc.titleTax Cap 2000: Five Economic Studiesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-21T23:57:29Z


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