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dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, Scott
dc.contributor.authorLeask, Linda
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Lance
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-28T20:54:41Z
dc.date.available2021-07-28T20:54:41Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12093
dc.description.abstractAnchorage began as a boom town, headquarters for construction of the Alaska Railroad. It’s seen many ups and downs since. But after 35 years of growth triggered by oil development—and boosted lately by an infusion of federal money—the city has grown to 277,000 and its economy is bigger, broader, and more dominant statewide. Despite that growth, the city still depends on resource development and state and federal spending (including military spending). It’s still subject to forces beyond its control, chiefly oil prices and production and federal and state policies affecting the flow of money into the economy. As long as Alaska prospers—and that depends a lot on how the state deals with its long-term fiscal problems - Anchorage will prosper.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska.en_US
dc.subjectAnchorageen_US
dc.subjectAlaska Railroaden_US
dc.subjectresource developmenten_US
dc.subjectoil pricesen_US
dc.subjectfiscal managementen_US
dc.titleAnchorage at 90: Changing Fast, With More to Comeen_US
dc.title.alternativeUnderstanding Alaska: Research Summary No. 4en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-28T20:54:41Z


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