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dc.contributor.authorTussing, Arlon R.
dc.contributor.authorTichotsky, John
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-29T20:31:41Z
dc.date.available2021-07-29T20:31:41Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationTussing, A. and Tichotsky, J. (2004). United or Divided Twins? The Political Economy of Beringia. Northern Expanses, no. 1-2, 6-11.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12113
dc.description.abstractWhen the US purchased Alaska from the Russians in1867 it quickly stepped into Russia's role in the colonial relationship. The US exploited salmon as the primary base resource from about 1878. Gold was discovered in lode deposits in the 1880s in the southeast of Alaska (Juneau and Treadwell), about the same time as the Lena goldfields of Irkutsk began to step up operations. We anticipate that Alaska contains or has demonstrated most of the elements that we can expect to see in the foreseeable development of other post-Soviet Arctic regions, including Alaska's nearest neighbor Chukotka, one of Russia's poorest and least modernized regions. This article was written for the 'Beringia' issue of the Northern Expanses journal which was a joint effort of the US National Park Service as part of the International Decade of Indigenous People.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherRussian Federation Printing Committeeen_US
dc.sourceNorthern Expansesen_US
dc.subjectChukotkaen_US
dc.subjectJuneauen_US
dc.subjectTreadwellen_US
dc.subjectresource developmenten_US
dc.subjectpost-Soviet Arctic regionsen_US
dc.subjectcolonial relationshipen_US
dc.subjectRussiaen_US
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleUnited or Divided Twins? The Political Economy of Beringiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-29T20:31:42Z
dc.identifier.journalNorthern Expansesen_US


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