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dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-04T19:33:54Z
dc.date.available2021-11-04T19:33:54Z
dc.date.issued1996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12389
dc.description.abstractIn the 30 years between statehood and 1990, Alaska was dominated by petroleum-driven growth punctuated by a number of boom and bust cycles, each of which has brought the economy to a higher plateau of activity. Since 1990 the Alaska economy has moved into a period of slower growth because petroleum production-the source of half of state value added-is now in decline. Continued exploitation of petroleum resources, even as production declines, as well as growth in other basic industries such as tourism and mining, will help to offset this loss and stabilize the economy. But dependence on commodity- producing industries means that cycles in the petroleum, fishing, timber, and mining sectors will continue to generate business cycles at the state and regional levels. This series of reports continues from previous economic projections which used 2020 as the end date for its modeling.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipChugach Electric Associationen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska.en_US
dc.subjecteconomic developmenten_US
dc.subjectrailbelten_US
dc.subjectkenai peninsulaen_US
dc.subjectmat-suen_US
dc.subjectboom and bust cyclesen_US
dc.subjectpetroleum productionen_US
dc.subjectanchorageen_US
dc.titleEconomic Projections for Alaska and the Southern Railbelt to 2025en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-04T19:33:55Z


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