Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBerman, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T20:06:12Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T20:06:12Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12474
dc.description.abstractThirty years ago, Chance (1966) wondered if hunting and fishing traditions of the people of the Arctic Slope of Alaska would survive the transition from nomadic to village life. The oil boom of the 1980s brought change to the region to an extent neither Chance nor Arctic dwellers themselves might have predicted (Knapp and Morehouse, 1991). Yet despite a vigorous wage economy fueled by two decades of oil revenues that yields a per-capita income exceeding the national average, subsistence traditions remain strong. Average per-capita harvest of subsistence foods in Alaska's North Slope Borough still exceeds a pound per day (Fuller and George, 1997). This document was prepared for presentation to the Western Regional Science Association annual meeting in Monterey, Californiaen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska.en_US
dc.subjectArctic Slopeen_US
dc.subjectwage economyen_US
dc.subjectper-capita incomeen_US
dc.subjectper-capita harvesten_US
dc.subjectsubsistence foodsen_US
dc.subjectvillage lifeen_US
dc.subjectNorth Slope Boroughen_US
dc.subjectWestern Regional Science Associationen_US
dc.titleSustainability and Subsistence in Arctic Communitiesen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-17T20:06:13Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
1998_02-SustainabilityAndSubsi ...
Size:
90Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Report

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record