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dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, Scott
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-17T23:28:36Z
dc.date.available2021-11-17T23:28:36Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12487
dc.description.abstractAlaska’s government has been down on its luck this year, with low oil prices, a big deficit, and legal disputes over the budget. Despite all that, Alaska still has substantial assets. The state’s share of Alaska oil reserves is worth—even at low oil prices—about $16 billion. The Permanent Fund has a balance of $13 billion and earned $1 billion last year. Pages 2 and 3 of this summary examine what is happening to the state’s assets—and why preserving and building them is so important. The foldout details the risks of relying exclusively on cash reserves. Page 4 provides a simple checklist for monitoring the state’s progress toward the long-term budget strategy called the Safe Landing.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Bank of Alaska; First National Bank of Anchorage; the Anchorage Daily News; Alascom, Inc.; Alaska National Insurance Company; Ketchikan Pulp Company; Lynden Incorporateden_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska.en_US
dc.subjectoil pricesen_US
dc.subjectAlaska Permanent Funden_US
dc.subjectchecklisten_US
dc.subjectcash reservesen_US
dc.subjectbudget strategyen_US
dc.titleHow Are We Doing? Monitoring Alaska's Fiscal Conditionen_US
dc.title.alternativeFiscal Policy Paper No. 9en_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2021-11-17T23:28:37Z


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