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dc.contributor.authorYoung, Joanna C.
dc.contributor.authorPettit, Erin
dc.contributor.authorArendt, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorHood, Eran
dc.contributor.authorListon, Glen E.
dc.contributor.authorBeamer, Jordan
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-06T22:30:52Z
dc.date.available2022-04-06T22:30:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-20
dc.identifier.citationYoung, J., E. Petit, A. Arendt, E. Hood, G. Liston, and J. Beamer (2021) A changing hydrological regime: Trends in magnitude and timing of glacier ice melt and glacier runoff in a high latitude coastal watershed, Water Resources Research, 57: e2020WR027404. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020WR027404en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/12857
dc.description.abstractWith a unique biogeophysical signature relative to other freshwater sources, meltwater from glaciers plays a crucial role in the hydrological and ecological regime of high latitude coastal areas. Today, as glaciers worldwide exhibit persistent negative mass balance, glacier runoff is changing in both magnitude and timing, with potential downstream impacts on infrastructure, ecosystems, and ecosystem resources. However, runoff trends may be difficult to detect in coastal systems with large precipitation variability. Here, we use the coupled energy balance and water routing model SnowModel-HydroFlow to examine changes in timing and magnitude of runoff from the western Juneau Icefield in Southeast Alaska between 1980 and 2016. We find that under sustained glacier mass loss (−0.57 ± 0.12 m w. e. a−1), several hydrological variables related to runoff show increasing trends. This includes annual and spring glacier ice melt volumes (+10% and +16% decade−1) which, because of higher proportions of precipitation, translate to smaller increases in glacier runoff (+3% and +7% decade−1) and total watershed runoff (+1.4% and +3% decade−1). These results suggest that the western Juneau Icefield watersheds are still in an increasing glacier runoff period prior to reaching “peak water.” In terms of timing, we find that maximum glacier ice melt is occurring earlier (2.5 days decade−1), indicating a change in the source and quality of freshwater being delivered downstream in the early summer. Our findings highlight that even in maritime climates with large precipitation variability, high latitude coastal watersheds are experiencing hydrological regime change driven by ongoing glacier mass loss.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank W. P. Dryer, C. McNeil, S. Candela, and J. Pierce for help in the field. R. Crumley and C. Cosgrove assisted with SnowModel initialization. The Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) provided field data and logistical support. E. Berthier provided geodetic data, F. Ziemen contributed model results, and C. McNeil provided assistance with datasets on behalf of both USGS and JIRP. The authors thank three anonymous reviewers for suggestions that have greatly improved the manuscript. This work was supported by a Department of Interior Alaska Climate Adaptation Science Center graduate fellowship awarded under Cooperative Agreement G17AC00213, by NASA under award NASANNX16AQ88G, by the National Science Foundation under award OIA-1208927 and by the State of Alaska (Experimental Program for Stimulating Competitive Research–Alaska Adapting to Changing Environments award), and by the University of Alaska Fairbanks Resilience and Adaptation Program. The authors acknowledge that field work was conducted on the traditional and unceded lands of the Lingit Aani (Tlingit), Michif Piyii (Métis), and Dënéndeh nations.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.subjectGlacier ice melten_US
dc.subjectGlacier runoffen_US
dc.subjectCoastal watersheden_US
dc.subjectMass balanceen_US
dc.subjectBiogeophysical signatureen_US
dc.subjectJuneau Icefielden_US
dc.subjectHydrological regime changeen_US
dc.titleA Changing Hydrological Regime: Trends in Magnitude and Timing of Glacier Ice Melt and Glacier Runoff in a High Latitude Coastal Watersheden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.peerreviewYesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-04-06T22:30:52Z
dc.identifier.journalWater Resources Researchen_US


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