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dc.contributor.authorTussing, Arlon R.
dc.contributor.authorRogers, George W.
dc.contributor.authorFischer, Victor
dc.contributor.authorET AL
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-29T18:29:12Z
dc.date.available2023-08-29T18:29:12Z
dc.date.issued1971-08-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/13532
dc.description.abstractOil was discovered on Alaska's arctic coast in 1968. The strike, which appeared significant from the start, caused great excitement and expectation in Alaska and elsewhere. Planning began immedi ately for construction of a trans-Alaska pipeline to carry arctic crude oil overland to the ice-free port of Valdez on the Gulf of Alaska. But these pipeline plans came into conflict with pending Native land claims and clashed with the environmental consciousness newly emerging in Alaska and the nation as a whole. After almost three years of delay, many problems have been solved and objectives have been met. Other issues remain to be resolved. A major remaining hurdle for the pipeline project is approval under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. That act, besides stating a general policy of environmental enhancement, re quires every federal agency to file an environmental impact state ment before taking any action which may significantly affect the environment. Hearings on the Interior Department's January 1971 draft impact statement made it clear that environmental effects of the proposed pipeline had to be evaluated in the context of a clear understanding of the project's economic impact. As a result, the United States Department of the Interior arranged with the Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research of the University of Alaska to prepare a study of the pipeline's likely economic impact on the state. The report would then be used by the Secretary of the Interior in making his final review of the proposed project. The Alaska Pipeline Report is the report prepared by the Institute of Social, Economic and Government Research (ISEGR) for the In terior Department. While it has been edited and updated for publica tion, it contains all the information contained in the original report. The study deals strictly with ascertainable facts and objective analyses and projections. There is no intent to pass judgment on thepipeline project as a whole. Rather, the purpose of the report is to provide an up-to-date analysis of Alaska's economy and project the impact of pipeline construction on that economy. This ISEGR report was prepared under the direction of Arlon R. Tussing, who is its principal author. Co-authors are George W. Rogers and Victor Fischer. Assistance was provided by Richard Norgaard of the University of California's Giannini Institute and by Gregg Erickson, currently staff economist of the Joint Pipeline Impact Committee, Alaska State Legislature. Prime responsibility for manu script preparation rested with Sandy Betts; Jennifer Christian edited the report and performed helpful rewriting. To make the text as readable and informative as possible, references and footnotes, some of which are extensive, have been included as "Technical Notes" at the end of each chapter. The reader should be aware that much important statistical information and substantive analyses are con tained in these technical notes. Valuable help was provided ISEGR by many individuals in both government and private organizations. Key among them were Harry Morrison and James T. Mccutcheon of the Western Oil and Gas Association; M.J.K. Savage, BP Alaska, Inc.; Bradford Tuck, Alaska Methodist University; Robert Snyder of the ISEGR staff; and John Post and Gary Klockenteger, Alaska Department of Labor. The manuscript was reviewed by Paul Bradley of the University of British Columbia; Walter Mead of the University of California at Santa Barbara; and a number of Alaska state officials, particularly Homer Burrell, Director of the Division of Oil and Gas, and Eric Wohlforth, Commissioner of Revenue. Additional contributions to the report and to better understanding resulted from reviews of the final draft by the Western Oil and Gas Association's Committee of Economists, by top officials and specialists of the state Division of Oil and Gas and the Department of Revenue, and by a cabinet level group of state officials.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe State of Alaskaen_US
dc.description.tableofcontentsCHAPTER I: INTRODUCTION Alaska Pipeline Report Assumptions, Estimates and Projections CHAPTER II: ALASKA'S POPULATION AND ECONOMY Population and Workforce Sources of Income Patterns of Employment Regional Differences Seasonal and Cyclical Fluctuations Unemployment Native Unemployment and Underemployment High Unemployment with High Employment Prices and Costs Land Ownership TECHNICAL NOTES CHAPTER III: THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN ALASKA History and Description Petroleum Mining Employment Alaska Petroleum and Natural Gas Reserves V 1 1 7 8 8 9 14 16 16 19 21 22 24 26 29 49 49 50 55 viii CONTENTS Proprietorship and the Operation of the Leasing System 58 Wellhead Price Determination 60 Demand for Alaska Petroleum 60 TECHNICAL NOTES 62 CHAPTER IV: IMPACT OF THE PIPELINE AND PRUDHOE BAY PRODUCTION UPON THE ALASKA ECONOMY 69 Methodology and Assumptions 69 Income from Royalties and Taxes on North Slope Crude Oil 7 3 State of Alaska 73 Individual Leaseholders 75 Alaska Natives 75 Direct Employment and Payrolls in Petroleum-Related Activities 80 Secondary and Indirect Impacts 83 Effect on Prices and Costs 87 Alaska Consumption of North Slope Oil and Gas 88 The Timber Industry in Interior Alaska 89 Mining 90 Availability and Cost of Capital 91 Costs to State and Local Government Directly Related to Petroleum 92 Transportation and Communication 92 Surveillance of Oil Fields, Pipeline and Terminal, and Administration of Leases 94 Other Direct State Costs 95 Impact on Communities 97 TECHNICAL NOTES 102 BIBLIOGRAPHY 127 LIST OF TABLES 1-1 Summary, Economic Impact of North Slope Petroleum Development Production and Transportation 3 11-1 Workforce Characteristics-1961 and 1970 10 11-2 Personal Income by Major Sources, Alaska, 1959 and 1970 15 11-3 Comparison of Anchorage Family Budget Costs With U.S. Averages, Spring 1970 25 II-Al Estimates of Total Alaska Resident Population and Components of Change, 1950-1970 29 II-A2 Alaska Population Characteristics 1970 Census 30 11-B Industrial Sources of Personal Income and Estimated Composition of Economic Base, Alaska 1970 35 11-C Personal Income by Major Sources, Alaska, 1959-1970 37 11-D Total Employed Workforce-State of Alaska-1939-1970 39 11-E Seasonal Fluctuations in Employment in Selected Industries and in Unemployment, Alaska 40 11-F Employment Status of Native Population Lower Yukon Kuskokwim Region, Alaska, March 1969 41 11-G Distribution of Alaska Natives by Size of Place, 1970 42 X TABLES II-H Selected Industries-Seasonal Indices of Employment 43 II-J Relative Change in Consumer Price Index, Anchorage and United States, 1960-1971 44 II-K Status of Lands in Alaska, 1968 45 III-1 Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Mining Employment by Standard Industrial Classification 52 III-2 Alaska Petroleum Industry (Non-Marketing) Number of Firms, Employment and Payrolls 53 III-A Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Mining Employment by Major Occupation-Fourth Quarter 1969 62 III-B Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Mining Activities Employment by Region and Area 63 III-C Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Mining Payrolls by Standard Industrial Classification 64 III-D Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Mining Payrolls by Region and Area 65 III-E Percentage Increases (Decreases) in Average Man-Year Mining Payrolls 65 III-F Summary of Alaska Petroleum Industry Manufacturing Pipeline, Gas, Wholesaling Employment and Payrolls 66 IV-1 Alyeska Pipeline Service Company Projected Schedule of Pipeline Capacity and Hypothetical Schedules of Pipeline Capacity, Conservative and Accelerated 72 IV-2 Royalty and Production Tax Revenue to the State of Alaska Calendar 1975-2000 74 IV-3 State Revenues Directly Attributable to North Slope Petroleum Operations 76 IV-4 Royalty Income From Prudhoe Bay Oil Production to Natives Under Claims Settlement 79 IV-5 IV-6 Employment in Prudhoe Bay Development and Production and in Construction and Operation of Transportation System 1970-1980 Trans-Alaska Pipeline Facilities Construction Direct Employment by Source of Workers IV-7 Total Income, Employment and Population Attributable IV-8 Expenditures Imposed on State Government Directly Attributable to North Slope Petroleum Activities IV-9 Workforce and Dependents Attributable to Arctic Slope Oil Production and Related Industries and Net Annual Population Change IV-A Projected Prudhoe Bay Related Mining Employment by Occupation IV-B Trans-Alaska Pipeline and Facilities Construction Employment by Major Occupation Class IV-C Payrolls From Prudhoe Bay Petroleum-Related Activities 1971-2000 IV-D Additions to Total Payrolls Directly Attributable to Arctic Slope Oil, Production, Transportation, Processing IV-E Employment Directly Attributable to Arctic Slope Oil Production, Transportation, Processing xi TABLES 81 84 97 99 109 110 111 112 113en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Social, Economic and Government Research, University of Alaskaen_US
dc.subjectAlaskaen_US
dc.subjectOil and Gasen_US
dc.titleAlaska Pipeline Report Alaska's Economy, Oil and Gas Industry Development, and the Economic Impact of Building and Operating the Trans-Alaska Pipelineen_US
dc.typeReporten_US
refterms.dateFOA2023-08-29T18:29:13Z


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