• Taxonomy and Ecology of the Inconnu, Stenodus Leucichthys Nelma, in Alaska

      Alt, Kenneth T. (University of Alaska. Institute of Arctic Biology, 1969-03)
      A taxonomic and life history study of the inconnu was carried out on populations from the Kobuk, Chatanika, and upper Yukon Rivers, and Selawik, Alaska. Data on 24 morphological measurements and 11 meristic counts show little difference among: 1) males and females; 2) young and older inconnu; and 3) fish from the upper Yukon River, Chatanika River, Selawik, and Kobuk River in Alaska and the Ob River, USSR. Based on close agreement of these counts and measurements, the inconnu in Alaska is designated as Stenodus leufifhthys nelma (Pallas). For arctic fish, the inconnu exhibits a rapid growth rate. Growth rates for males and females are similar, but females live longer than males. Alaskan inconnu become sexually mature quite late in life (for Selawik males, 9 years; females, 10 years). Spawning behavior is described. Spawning occurred in the Kobuk River above Kobuk the last days of September at water temperatures betwen 1/4 and 4.6 C. Older inconnu are mainly piscivorous while the younger fish feed on invertebrates and fish. The least cisco, Coregonus sardinella, was the main food item of the Selawik inconnu. The estimated catch in Northwest Alaska in 1965 was between 34,200 and 37,000 fish, 85% of which were taken for subsistence.
    • Variations in the Skull of the Bearded Seal

      Manning, T. H. (University of Alaska. Institute of Arctic Biology, 1974-11)
      Fourteen measurements taken on 260 skulls are described and analysed using variance, covariance, reduced major axes, and discriminant functions. No sexual variation is found. Changes in relative growth with age are demonstrated and discussed. Skulls from the Atlantic adult population are shown to be significantly larger than those from the Pacific in most dimensions. An important exception, nasal breadth, is significantly smaller. Differences in the regression coefficients between the Atlantic and Pacific populations are probably not significant, but some differences in position of the regression lines are highly significant. The results are compared with those of some previous authors and the boundaries between the populations considered. The recognition of E. b. nauticus for the Pacific population is justified.
    • Vegetation in the vicinity of the Toolik Field Station, Alaska

      Walker, Donald A.; Maier, Hilmar A. (University of Alaska. Institute of Arctic Biology, 2008)
      This publication contains a group of vegetation maps at three scales in the vicinity of the Toolik Field Station. Alaska, which is an arctic research facility run by the Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The maps are intended to support research at the field station. The front side of this map sheet contains a vegetation map and ancillary maps of a 751-km squared region surrounding the upper Kuparuk River watershed, including the Toolik Lake and the lmnavait Creek research areas, as well as portions of the Dalton Highway and Trans-Alaska Pipeline from the northern end of Galbraith Lake to Slope Mountain. The reverse side shows more detailed vegetation maps of the 20-km squared research area centered on Toolik Lake and a 1.2-km squared intensive research grid on the south side of Toolik Lake (red rectangles on Map A). All the maps are part of a hierarchical geographic information system (GIS) and the Web-based Arctic Geobotanical Atlas (http:/www.arcticatlas.org/). The atlas also includes other map themes for all three areas and a previously published hierarchy of maps of the lmnavait Creek area (Walker et al. 1989: Walker and Walker 1996) (black rectangles on Map A). Photos and explanations of the geobotanical mapping units and the supporting field data and metadata can also be found on the website.