• The Agricultural Outlook: 1965

      Marsh, C.F.; Burton, W.E.; Saunders, A.D. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-03)
      The general economic picture for 1965 indicates another better-than average year for the nation as a whole. Strong advances in economic activity now underway will likely continue at least through the first half of the year. Current trends reveal no serious imbalances in the economy. Forces expected to shape demand expansion for business, consumers and the government in coming months are (1) continued uptrend in business investments, (2) favorable inventory-sales ratios, (3) further improvement in the goods and services export-import trade balance, (4) more favorable factors affecting demand for housing, schools, and facilities, (5) expanded consumer purchases of goods and services, (6) another big sales year for autos, (7) larger consumer expenditures for food, and (8) increased government purchases of goods and services.
    • Alaska Agricultural Directory

      Lampard, Pete (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Alaska Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, Soil Conservation Service, 1957-06)
      The Farm Directory has been assembled through the cooperation of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, the Alaska Department of Agriculture, the Extension Service,s and the Soil Conservation Service. The Directory includes the various agencies who work with farmers, their addresses and staffs in addition to the names, addresses, and other pertinent information concerning farmers in the territory. The Directory will be of interest and benefit to farmers and various agencies and individuals working with the farmers and farming in Alaska.
    • Alaska Crop Improvement Association: Seed Certification Hand Book

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska Extension Service, 1956
      This bulletin brings together information on certified seed production in Alaska, It is hoped that it will acquaint Alaskans with the aims of a certified seed program and the work of the Alaska Crop Improvement Association in accomplishing those aims. It is a reference to the current rules for the production of certified seed and is issued in loose-leaf form to facilitate revision as changes occur.
    • Alaska Farms: Organization and Practices in 1949

      Moore, Clarence A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-03)
      This is the second of a series of annual studies being conducted to determine the types of farm organization and farm practices consistent with a stable and profitable farm economy, Detailed records of organization and operations in 1949 were taken from cooperating growers in the Matanuska Valley and in the Fairbanks area of the Tanana Valley. Information was secured on the extent of farming in the Anchorage area and on the Kenai peninsula.
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1963

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1963
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1964

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-01
    • Better Forage for Alaska's dairy industry

      University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-01-08
    • CASH IN! On a New Late-Summer Forage Source -- Common Ryegrass -- Seeded with Early-Harvested Oats & Peas

      Klebesadel, L.J.; Brundage, A.L.; Sweetman, W.J. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1963-05)
    • The Challenge of Circumpolar Biological Research: a report to the Rockefeller Foundation

      Logsdon, Charles E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1963-11)
      To foster closer working relationships between Alaska and countries of northern Europe through exchange of personnel to work on problems of mutual concern. This report deals only with this first objective of the project and is based on observations and conclusions of Dr. Charles E. Logsdon, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station Research Plant Pathologist, during his tour of duty at Vollebekk, Norway, from September, 1961, to August, 1962. The other project objectives will be covered in subsequent reports.
    • Dairy and Potato Farms: In the Matanuska and Tanana Valleys 1951

      Andrews, Richard A.; Johnson, Hugh A.; Martin, Paul F. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
      The study reported here is one of a series designed to provide in formation on farm organization in Alaska for aiding economics development and expansion of permanent farm units. Records were obtained on 46 farm s in the Matanuska Valley and 4 farm s in the Tanana Valley; all were included in the 1950 study. Analysis is limited to a description of the general farm situation in 1951 and to a comparison with 1947, 1949 and 1950.
    • AN EXAMINATION OF A DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS PURCHASE PROGRAM FOR ALASKA AGRICULTURAL LANDS

      Workman, William G.; Arobio, Edward L.; Gasbarro, Anthony F. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1979-01)
      Many Alaskans are concerned about the conversion of highly productive agricultural lands to nonagricultural uses now occurring in the state. Land on the urban fringes of Anchorage and Fairbanks that once produced vegetables and grains or supported dairy farms appears most vulnerable to this conversion. As major population centers grow, residential, shopping center and industrial land uses displace agriculture because they render greater returns. This displacement is viewed by some as not being in society's best interest. Those concerned about the loss of agricultural lands argue that these lands are some of the best agricultural lands in the state and are vital to maintaining the agricultural economy of the state. In addition, it is suggested that their preservation will help to maintain a much desired way of life and to provide needed open space. The state and municipal governments in Alaska have made attempts to intervene in the land market to slow down or stop agricultural land conversion. Methods employed to date include tax incentives and the sale of only the agricultural rights on state or municipal lands. This report discusses the feasibility of an alternative means of preserving agricultural lands, namely, the public purchase of development rights from private landowners. Under this voluntary arrangement, private agricultural landowners would be compensated for giving up their option to develop their land for nonagricultural purposes.
    • An examination of a development rights purchase program for Alaska Agricultural lands: Final Report

      Workman, William G.; Arobio, Edward L.; Gasbarro, Anthony F. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1978-12-09)
      Many Alaskans are concerned about the conversion of highly productive agricultural lands to nonagricultural uses now occurring in the state. Land on the urban fringes of Anchorage and Fairbanks that once produced vegetables and grains or supported dairy farms appear is the most vulnerable to this conversion. As major population centers grow, residential, shopping center and industrial land uses displace agriculture because they render greater returns. This displacement is viewed by some as not being in society's best interest. Those concerned about the loss of agricultural lands argue that these lands are some of the best agricultural lands in the state and are vital to maintaining the agricultural economy of the state. In addition, it is suggested that their preservation will help to maintain a much desired way of life and to provide needed open space. The state and municipal governments in Alaska have made attempts to intervene in the land market to slow down or stop agricultural land conversion. Methods employed to date include tax incentives and the sale only of the agricultural rights on state or municipal lands. This report discusses the feasibility of an alternative means of preserving agricultural lands, namely, the public purchase of development rights from private landowners. Under this voluntary arrangement, private agricultural landowners would be compensated for giving up their option to develop their land for nonagricultural purposes.
    • Farm and Consumer Research:1962

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1963-04
    • FARMING IN THE ALASKAN RAILBELT: 1952

      Andrews, Richard (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-10)
      Over half of the farmers in the Railbelt area of Alaska located on their farms after World War II, Farming on the current scale is so new that it is in a constant state of flux. Changes frequently occur in farm practices and in farm ownership. Shortage of cropland and inadequate buildings place a temporary ceiling on expansion of major lines of farming in all agricultural areas. Liberal amounts of credit must become available for continuation of the rapid expansion experienced in the past. The major reason why various kinds of agricultural enterprises developed as they have in leading agricultural areas can be found in the history of agricultural settlement. The Matanuska Valley provided nearly half of the agricultural production in Alaska in 1952, More families were engaged in farming in this valley than in any other area in Alaska. Milk sales topped all others as a source of income and more full-time farmers had dairies than any other enterprise. Potatoes were second in importance with numerous part-time farmers growing varying acreages. Poultry and vegetable production both follow a similar pattern of numerous small producers and only a few specialized farms. The Tanana Valley was the second most important agricultural area in 1952, Most farmers relied on potatoes for their major source of farm income. Vegetables were grown as a minor enterprise on several farms. Few flocks of hens were found., Although interest in dairy farming has been strong in this area, only 3 farms produced milk in surplus quantities in 1952* Of these 3 farms, one was a public institution, one was exceptionally large,, and one was exceptionally s^iall. Lack of housing and domestic water have deterred both dairy and poultry farming,, Compared to the above areas, agricultural development on the Kenai Peninsula has been slow. Farmers have been greatly handicapped by lack of a source of borrowed capital and by distance from a si2able market. Livestock and poultry are the major enterprises. Even though 12 of the 19 farmers interviewed grew potatoes, acreages usually were small. Vegetable production is not great because most of the produce is sold locally and not much produce is demanded by this market. Shortages of equipment necessitate a great deal of hand work.
    • FARMING IN THE: MATANUSKA VALLEY

      Andrews, Richard A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1955-06)
    • Farms of Railbelt Alaska

      Andrews, Richard A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1954-12)
      Gross farm income to Alaskans was nearly 3 million dollars in 1953. Milk was the most important farm product, followed by sales of potatoes, poultry and vegetables, The Matanuska Valley provided over half of the total farm production, Seventy-six farmers were interviewed in 1953, Of these, 39 were dairy farmers , 23 were potato farmers , 5 were poultry farmers, 4 were vegetables farmers and 5 were miscellaneous farmers. Dairymen as a whole increased their cow numbers faster than they cleared land in preparation for larger herds. Potato farmers experienced a very poor year. Yields were high and acreage planted was greater than ever before, but disease cut the crop drastically and the market was very competitive, This was the first year in the past 5 that potato growers as a group lost money. Poultry producers obtained a greater average rate of lay per hen than in previous years, Even so, the margin of return was small. The Tanana Valley was the second most important agricultural area in 1C)53. Potatoes were the leading enterprise. There was much interest in dairy farming but lack of capital, buildings and a dependable water supply are major deterrents to development of this enterprise, On many potential dairy farms, cleared land was no longer a limiting factor because over one-third of the cropland was either idle or in green manure crops. Tanana Valley potato growers who received the greatest net farm returns from their farm operations obtained high yields, had a high percentage of US #1 potatoes, had a sizeable acreage in crops and utilized considerable family labor. The other leading agricultural areas -the Kenai Peninsula, Southeastern Alaska and the Aleutian Chain-were the source of over 20 percent of the total agricultural production in Alaska during 1953. Several types of farm enterprises prevailed in these areas and on varying scales of production. Dairy and poultry were the leading enterprises in Southeastern Alaska, poultry and beef on the Kenai Peninsula and beef and sheep on the Aleutian Chain. No one enterprise existed on sufficient numbers of farms to make analysis possible when information was collected by the survey method.
    • FERTILITY STATUS OF ALASKAN FIELDS 1956

      Scarseth, George D. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1956-09)
      Alaska's Extension Service was fortunate in again obtaining the services of Dr. George D. Scarseth, Director of Research for the American Farm Research Association. His task during the 1956 growing season was to review the fertility status of potato fields and to diagnose the potato malady that has reduced yields in recent years. Having familiarized himself with the symptoms during the 1955 season, he came back to Alaska in August of this year to study in greater detail the onslaught of this malady and to help interpret the results of studies designed to: explore basic causes and possible corrective measures. Dr. Scarseth's report is here reproduced in full for the guidance of farmers and agencies dealing with food production in Alaska.
    • Food Prices in Alaska with Supplemental Cost of Living Data...1960 to 1970

      Marsh, Charles F. (University of Alaska Cooperative Extension Service, 1971-03)
      The Quarterly Report on Alaska's Food Prices was started by economists at the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station in 1951. Since then, enumerators have collected food prices from three to six retail stores in selected Alaska cities for analysis and reporting by the Experiment Station. Collection of prices occurs simultaneously in each survey city during the week containing the 15th day of the month surveyed. Enumerators quote prices on the brand of each food item which is selling in greatest volume in each store surveyed. Prices of individual food items from the stores in each city are averaged to obtain the survey price. Only six cities were surveyed when the study first began - Anchorage, Palmer, Fairbanks, Juneau, Ketchikan and Sitka. Because o f the need and demand for cost o f living data from other areas with in the state, the survey has been expanded to include Petersburg, Kodiak, Seward, Valdez, Kenai-Soldotna, Nome and Bethel. Over 6,000 copies of Alaska's Quarterly Food Price Reports are printed each quarter and mailed by request to government agencies, chambers of commerce, labor organizations, businesses and individuals throughout Alaska, other states and several foreign countries.
    • FORAGE PLAN TS, SOILS, AND GENERAL GRAZING CONDITIONS ON UMNAK, KODIAK AND OTHER AREAS IN SOUTHERN ALASKA

      Dickson, James G. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1956-11)
      The preliminary survey of the plant species of grazing value found in the several areas is reported . Some comments on management and other problems are included. The information given is restricted to a few sections. Although the flora is similar for those studied, additional islands must be studied before general application to other specific areas is attempted.
    • Herd Management Tips to Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Palmer, Alaska, 1956-01)