• Alaska Agricultural Directory

      Lampard, Pete (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Alaska Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, Soil Conservation Service, 1957-06)
      The Farm Directory has been assembled through the cooperation of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, the Alaska Department of Agriculture, the Extension Service,s and the Soil Conservation Service. The Directory includes the various agencies who work with farmers, their addresses and staffs in addition to the names, addresses, and other pertinent information concerning farmers in the territory. The Directory will be of interest and benefit to farmers and various agencies and individuals working with the farmers and farming in Alaska.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1958-02)
      In 1957 the conception rate has run about the same as in past years, except that August was the lowest month for the year. The figures show that 81% of the cows conceived on their first two services and nearly 92% on their first three services. Only 97 cows out of 1,177 required more than three services. This is about the percentage would would be expected. Usually some of these difficult cows will get with calf and some of them never will.
    • Agricultural Research 1958

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1958-12-30
      An administrative report for the calendar year compiled by the staff in compliance with the several enabling acts, and in accordance with the rules and regulations of the United States Department of Agriculture.
    • Irrigation in Alaska's Matanuska Valley

      Michaelson, Neil; Branton, C. Ivan (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1958-12-30)
    • Mutual Plant Disease Problems Alaska and Northern Europe: Observations and Notes of a 1958 field review

      Logsdon, Charles E. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-02-03)
      Through the assistance of the Rockefeller Foundation, the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station was enabled to continue its studies of the relations of Alaska's agricultural problems to those of Northern Europe by sending Dr. Charles E. Logsdon to Europe to investigate mutual phytopathological problems. Prior investigations consisted of a review of horticultural and general farming problems by Mr. Arvo Kallio who spent the growing season of 1956 in Northern Europe, and a three-month's review of the Alaska Station's research program by Professor 0ivind Nissen of the Agricultural College at Vollebekk, Norway. During his stay in Europe, Dr. Logsdon also presented a paper at the VII International Congress for Microbiology in Stockholm, Sweden, on one phase of Alaska’s phytopathological research— Allan H. Mick, Director.
    • Dairy Farming With Dollars and Sense in the Matanuska Valley

      University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-02-19
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-03)
      This has been a good year in getting cows with calf. Begining in April, 1958, 89.6 per cent of all cows conceived on the first two services. This is an exceptionally good rate . Only 99 cows needed servicing four times or more—8.4 per cent of the total. This is lower than average far several years, and is lower than in many breeding associations in the other States.
    • Oats and Barley growing and storing grain in Alaska's Matanuska and Tanana valleys, 1957-1958

      Branton, C. Ivan (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-12)
      Plant before June 1 for best yields and quality, and to improve chances for a September harvest. Control weeds to improve acre yields, to utilize fertilizer efficiently, and to reduce storage problems caused by wet weed seed. Do not rely on field drying grain to a safe storage moisture content. Have some means of artificial drying ready at harvest time. Plan on September harvest to utilize the best chance of favorable field drying conditions, and to reduce shattering losses.
    • Farm & Consumer research in Alaska:1959

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-12-30
      Agricultural research in Alaska is cooperatively sponsored by the University and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Since 1948 the federal government has assumed major responsibility and leadership in this field, and has contributed generously to its financial support and technical'direction, over and above the normal Hatch Act allotments. Largely developmental in character, agriculture (including marketing) research is adminstered from the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station headquarters at Palmer -- an installation maintained by the Agricultural Research Service -- rather than from the College Campus. Some plant breeding and plant pathology studies are conducted at this site, together with modest investigations of plant characteristics involving winter hardiness, cold survival, and plant responses to photoperiod and light quality. All investigations are supervised by eight senior project leaders, assisted by twelve junior leaders and a labor and clerical staff.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-02)
    • Three Year Summary of Investment, Cost and Income for Dairy Farms in Alaska

      Saunders, A. Dale; Gazaway, H.P.; Marsh, C.F. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-05)
    • Delivery Routes Sell More Milk in Anchorage

      Gazaway, H.P.; Marsh, Charles (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-10)
      A primary objective of this study was to determine the number of households purchasing dairy products from delivery routes, and the number buying from stores. Also of interest were the amounts purchased per household and per person, family characteristics such as income, family size, and so- forth, and their preferences for home delivery versus store -purchasing.
    • Soil survey and vegetation : Northeastern Kodiak Island Area, Alaska

      Rieger, Samuel; Wunderlich, R. Eugene (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-10)
    • Farm & Consumer research in Alaska: 1960

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-12-30
      Agricultural research in Alaska is cooperatively and jointly sponsored and supported by the University and the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Since 1948 t he federal government has assumed major leadership and responsibility in this field, and has contributed generously to its financial support and technical direction, over and above the normal Hatch Act allotments to all land grant colleges and universities. Largely developmental in character, Alaska's farm and consumer research is administered from the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station headquarters at Palmer an installation maintained by the Agricultural Research Service -- rather than from the College campus. Some plant breeding and plant pathology studies are conducted at this site, together with modest investigations of plant characteristics involving winter hardiness, cold survival, and plant responses to photoperiod and light quality. Investigations are initiated and supervised by eight senior project leaders, assisted by twelve junior leaders and a labor and clerical staff.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairy Breeders

      Sweetman, William J. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1961-01)
      Until mid-1957 most dairymen were expanding their herds. Many old animals were kept that were difficult to breed. When a military market failed to materialize in 1957, many of these unsatisfactory cows were the first to be culled. This culling accounts in part for the improvement in conception rates beginning in late 1957. Other contributing factors were better communications and roads, possibly better insemination skills, and more important the economic squeeze that forced operators to watch more carefully for heat periods.
    • Alaska Farm & Consumer Research: 1961

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-01-01
      Agricultural research has played a major role in developing the productive efficiency of the United States, ours is a strong nation because, alone among the world powers, it is self-reliant with respect to food and fiber. The industrial strength and standard of living enjoyed by the United States rests on less than 10 per cent of its labor force which grows more than enough food and fiber for the rest of the population. One farmer in this country today feeds 23 people at home and three more abroad This astonishing productivity has released the remaining 90 per cent of the labor force for industrial and service jobs, While Russia and China demonstrate that large agrarian populations can subsist in this modern world, they also demonstrate that urban welfare depends on the.skill of rural workers in growing more than enough for their own needs. The fundamental dependence of urban populations is often overlooked — especially here in Alaska — where most people take for granted a sophisticated and complex food production system envied by all other countries.
    • Better Forage for Alaska's dairy industry

      University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-01-08
    • Costs & Returns for 15 Dairy Farms in Alaska's Matanuska Valley, 1960

      Welling, Charles L. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-03)
      Information summarized in the following table is based on 1960 records obtained from 15 dairy farms in the Matanuska Valley. The three high and three low income farms were selected on the basis of their total net cash income.
    • Producing Beef for Alaska's Railbelt

      Saudners, Dale A. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-03)
      The object of this report is to try and determine what it will cost to produce beef in the Kenai Peninsula and other parts of the Railbelt. Because little beef is being produced in this area, it has been necessary to project beef enterprises, rather than to cite actual case studies.
    • Household buying of Fresh Milk and Dairy Products in Anchorage, Alaska

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-04