Now showing items 1-20 of 31

    • An examination of a development rights purchase program for Alaska Agricultural lands: Final Report

      Workman, William G.; Arobio, Edward L.; Gasbarro, Anthony F. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1978-12-09)
      Many Alaskans are concerned about the conversion of highly productive agricultural lands to nonagricultural uses now occurring in the state. Land on the urban fringes of Anchorage and Fairbanks that once produced vegetables and grains or supported dairy farms appear is the most vulnerable to this conversion. As major population centers grow, residential, shopping center and industrial land uses displace agriculture because they render greater returns. This displacement is viewed by some as not being in society's best interest. Those concerned about the loss of agricultural lands argue that these lands are some of the best agricultural lands in the state and are vital to maintaining the agricultural economy of the state. In addition, it is suggested that their preservation will help to maintain a much desired way of life and to provide needed open space. The state and municipal governments in Alaska have made attempts to intervene in the land market to slow down or stop agricultural land conversion. Methods employed to date include tax incentives and the sale only of the agricultural rights on state or municipal lands. This report discusses the feasibility of an alternative means of preserving agricultural lands, namely, the public purchase of development rights from private landowners. Under this voluntary arrangement, private agricultural landowners would be compensated for giving up their option to develop their land for nonagricultural purposes.
    • The Agricultural Outlook: 1965

      Marsh, C.F.; Burton, W.E.; Saunders, A.D. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-03)
      The general economic picture for 1965 indicates another better-than average year for the nation as a whole. Strong advances in economic activity now underway will likely continue at least through the first half of the year. Current trends reveal no serious imbalances in the economy. Forces expected to shape demand expansion for business, consumers and the government in coming months are (1) continued uptrend in business investments, (2) favorable inventory-sales ratios, (3) further improvement in the goods and services export-import trade balance, (4) more favorable factors affecting demand for housing, schools, and facilities, (5) expanded consumer purchases of goods and services, (6) another big sales year for autos, (7) larger consumer expenditures for food, and (8) increased government purchases of goods and services.
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1964

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1965-01
    • Alaska's Farm & Consumer Resources: 1963

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1963
    • Farm and Consumer Research:1962

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1963-04
    • AN EXAMINATION OF A DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS PURCHASE PROGRAM FOR ALASKA AGRICULTURAL LANDS

      Workman, William G.; Arobio, Edward L.; Gasbarro, Anthony F. (Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1979-01)
      Many Alaskans are concerned about the conversion of highly productive agricultural lands to nonagricultural uses now occurring in the state. Land on the urban fringes of Anchorage and Fairbanks that once produced vegetables and grains or supported dairy farms appears most vulnerable to this conversion. As major population centers grow, residential, shopping center and industrial land uses displace agriculture because they render greater returns. This displacement is viewed by some as not being in society's best interest. Those concerned about the loss of agricultural lands argue that these lands are some of the best agricultural lands in the state and are vital to maintaining the agricultural economy of the state. In addition, it is suggested that their preservation will help to maintain a much desired way of life and to provide needed open space. The state and municipal governments in Alaska have made attempts to intervene in the land market to slow down or stop agricultural land conversion. Methods employed to date include tax incentives and the sale of only the agricultural rights on state or municipal lands. This report discusses the feasibility of an alternative means of preserving agricultural lands, namely, the public purchase of development rights from private landowners. Under this voluntary arrangement, private agricultural landowners would be compensated for giving up their option to develop their land for nonagricultural purposes.
    • REVEGETATION RESEARCH ON AMCHITKA ISLAND, A MARITIME TUNDRA LOCATION IN ALASKA: Final Report

      Mitchell, Wm. W. (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1976-05)
      Revegetation studies commenced by the Alaskan Agricultural Experiment Station in 1970 on Amchitka Island culminated in 1973 with the seeding of disturbed areas associated with the nuclear testing program. Cool temperatures coupled with strong winds and a high incidence of fog and cloud cover impose a tundra aspect on Amchitka, one of Alaska's most southerly land areas. Natural revegetation is undependable for the near term. Twenty-two perennial grasses, two clovers, and four annual grasses were tested on different soil types at low to medium-high (480 ft) elevation sites. At higher elevations severe winds and frost action maintain a barren-ground aspect. Relatively humic, acidic sites were the least favorable, a test site gravel pad the most favorable. Cultivars of red fescue--Boreal, Pennlawn, and Highlight chewings— and an experimental entry of Bering hairgrass, taxa conspecific with species found on the island, and Engmo timothy performed the best. Kentucky bluegrasses and reed canarygrass grew moderately well. Wheatgrasses, wildrye, bromegrass, creeping foxtail, grandis alkaligrass, redtop bentgrass, and white and alsike clover performed unsatisfactorily at some or all of the sites. The revegetation seeding mix included Boreal red fescue, Highlight chewings fescue, Bering hairgrass, and annual ryegrass. Fertilization was necessary to establish plants on most sites. Plants responded erratically to added N on relatively humic, acidic soils, but more normally on gravelly and subsoil sites. Raising the P ration improved fertilizer response. Fertilization greatly enhanced growth on a disturbed site undergoing natural revegetation.
    • The Challenge of Circumpolar Biological Research: a report to the Rockefeller Foundation

      Logsdon, Charles E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1963-11)
      To foster closer working relationships between Alaska and countries of northern Europe through exchange of personnel to work on problems of mutual concern. This report deals only with this first objective of the project and is based on observations and conclusions of Dr. Charles E. Logsdon, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station Research Plant Pathologist, during his tour of duty at Vollebekk, Norway, from September, 1961, to August, 1962. The other project objectives will be covered in subsequent reports.
    • Alaska Agricultural Directory

      Lampard, Pete (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Alaska Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service, Soil Conservation Service, 1957-06)
      The Farm Directory has been assembled through the cooperation of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, the Alaska Department of Agriculture, the Extension Service,s and the Soil Conservation Service. The Directory includes the various agencies who work with farmers, their addresses and staffs in addition to the names, addresses, and other pertinent information concerning farmers in the territory. The Directory will be of interest and benefit to farmers and various agencies and individuals working with the farmers and farming in Alaska.
    • Alaska Crop Improvement Association: Seed Certification Hand Book

      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska Extension Service, 1956
      This bulletin brings together information on certified seed production in Alaska, It is hoped that it will acquaint Alaskans with the aims of a certified seed program and the work of the Alaska Crop Improvement Association in accomplishing those aims. It is a reference to the current rules for the production of certified seed and is issued in loose-leaf form to facilitate revision as changes occur.
    • Better Forage for Alaska's dairy industry

      University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-01-08
    • utilization of native BLUEJOINT grass in alaska

      Klebesadel, L.J.; Laughlin, W.M. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1964-03)
    • Planting Rate of Oats & Peas: Some Yield, Quality, and Cost Considerations

      Klebesadel, L.J. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1966-11)
    • CASH IN! On a New Late-Summer Forage Source -- Common Ryegrass -- Seeded with Early-Harvested Oats & Peas

      Klebesadel, L.J.; Brundage, A.L.; Sweetman, W.J. (University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1963-05)
    • Guidelines for the Production of Rapeseed in the Delta-Clearwater Area of Alaska

      University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1978-04
      Experience with the production of rapeseed in Alaska is limited. The material presented in this report is for preliminary planning only. It was prepared on the basis of published Canadian research, and studies of variety trials and planting dates during 1977 in interior Alaska. These guidelines will be revised when the results of additional research and experience with rapeseed production in Alaska becomes available.
    • Report of Progress: January 1 to December 31, 1952

      Irwin, Don L. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-01)
      Each calendar year the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station submits a Progress Report to the University of Alaska and the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the 2 cooperating agencies under which it operates. This 1952 report segregates the work of each department, reporting briefly the progress made on each project currently under investigation, contributions to scientific knowledge or to the public interest and phases of the work to receive special attention during the coming year. Due credit is given to cooperating agencies and to various station personnel where more than one department is involved on a project. Briefly reported, also, are improvements and additions to physical plant, personnel changes, publications of the station during the year, and sources of financial support.
    • Administrative Report of Progress: January 1 to December 31, 1951

      Irwin, Don L. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-12)
      This booklet is a compilation of annual administrative reports required of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, a public supported research institution. Shown here is a complete outline of research problems under study during the year just ended. Objectives financ ial support, accomplishments during 1951 and lines of aproach to be emphasized during the next crop season are a l l set forth in detail. Also indicated is the intricate cooperation established with allied agencies, perfected in an effort to eliminate overlapping in adjacent areas of interest. Staff assignments are presented in order to fix responsibilities and to give credit vhere due. A brief discussion of the physical plant is also included to show what progress has been made in the building program, now some three years old, and to point out certain housekeeping problems that, in the public interest must be solved in the near future.
    • Report of Progress: January 1, 1950 to December 31, 1950

      Irwin, Don L. (1950-12-31)
      Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station Staff -- Director's Report -- Fairbanks Experiment Station, Report of Superintendent -- Matanuska Experiment Station, Report of Superintendent -- Petersburg Experimental Fur Station, Report of Superintendent -- Soil Science Project Reports -- Horticulture Project Reports -- Animal Husbandry Project Reports -- Agricultural Engineering Project Reports -- Agricultural Economics Project Reports -- Agronomy Project Reports -- Entomology Project Reports -- Alaska Work and Line Project Index
    • Mutual Plant Disease Problems Alaska and Northern Europe: Observations and Notes of a 1958 field review

      Logsdon, Charles E. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-02-03)
      Through the assistance of the Rockefeller Foundation, the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station was enabled to continue its studies of the relations of Alaska's agricultural problems to those of Northern Europe by sending Dr. Charles E. Logsdon to Europe to investigate mutual phytopathological problems. Prior investigations consisted of a review of horticultural and general farming problems by Mr. Arvo Kallio who spent the growing season of 1956 in Northern Europe, and a three-month's review of the Alaska Station's research program by Professor 0ivind Nissen of the Agricultural College at Vollebekk, Norway. During his stay in Europe, Dr. Logsdon also presented a paper at the VII International Congress for Microbiology in Stockholm, Sweden, on one phase of Alaska’s phytopathological research— Allan H. Mick, Director.
    • Alaska Farm & Consumer Research: 1961

      University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1962-01-01
      Agricultural research has played a major role in developing the productive efficiency of the United States, ours is a strong nation because, alone among the world powers, it is self-reliant with respect to food and fiber. The industrial strength and standard of living enjoyed by the United States rests on less than 10 per cent of its labor force which grows more than enough food and fiber for the rest of the population. One farmer in this country today feeds 23 people at home and three more abroad This astonishing productivity has released the remaining 90 per cent of the labor force for industrial and service jobs, While Russia and China demonstrate that large agrarian populations can subsist in this modern world, they also demonstrate that urban welfare depends on the.skill of rural workers in growing more than enough for their own needs. The fundamental dependence of urban populations is often overlooked — especially here in Alaska — where most people take for granted a sophisticated and complex food production system envied by all other countries.