• POTATO STORAGE IN ALASKA’S MATANUSKA VALLEY

      Edgar, Alfred D.; Irwin, Don (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1948-05)
      “P O T A T O E S are an important food in Alaska. Matanuska V alley farmers can produce enough to meet the needs of the Anchorage area if the crop can be kept satisfactorily from one year to the next. The Alaska climate, however, makes better-than-average storage and management necessary to insure a continuous supply throughout the year.
    • Potato Variety Performance

      Carling, D.E.; Westphale, P.C. (Palmer Research Center, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1989-04)
      A comparative yield trial with 24 named varieties and numbered selections of potatoes was conducted at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station’s Palmer Research Center during the 1988 growing season. The trial was conducted at the Matanuska Research Farm, located six miles west of Palmer on Trunk Road. Nonirrigated trials have been conducted annually since 1982, and irrigated trials started in 1985. Results of previous trials have been recorded in AFES Circulars 49, 54, 58 and 65. These circulars are available at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station offices in Fairbanks and Palmer.
    • POTATO VARIETY PERFORMANCE ALASKA 1985

      Carling, D.E.; Rissi, P. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1986-01)
      Comparative yield suitable, or potentially suitable, commercial production potato varieties were conducted during the 1985 growing season by the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Palmer Research Center. Forty names and numbered varieties were included in the 1985 trial. Numbered varieties originated in the potato-breeding program of Dr. C. H. Dearborn.
    • POTATO VARIETY PERFORMANCE ALASKA 1986

      Carling, D.E.; Rissi, P. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1987-02)
      A comparative yield trial with 44 named varieties and numbered selections of potatoes was conducted at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station’s (AFES) Palmer Research Center during the 1986 growing season. This yield trial is the continuation of a potato variety testing program initiated in 1982. The trial again was conducted at the Matanuska Research Farm, located on Trunk Road near Palmer. Nonirrigated trials have been conducted each year beginning in 1982, but irrigated trials were not initiated until 1985. Results of previous trials are recorded in Circulars 49 and 54, available at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station offices in Fairbanks and Palmer. As in past years, varieties with long production histories in Alaska (Alaska 114, Bakeking, Green Mountain, Kennebec, Superior) are included and serve as a comparative base for newly developed varieties or older varieties that in the past have escaped testing at this location. Varieties that compare favorably with the above listed standards may warrant some consideration by commercial growers. In continuance of a program that was initiated in 1985, abbreviated versions of the AFES potato yield trial were conducted at locations in various parts of the state. These off-station trials again were made possible by the willingness of cooperators to plant, tend and harvest the crop. The seven off-station sites include several where comparative testing of potato varieties has not been reported previously.
    • POTATO VARIETY PERFORMANCE ALASKA 1987

      Carling, Donald E.; Rissi, Peter (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1988-03)
      A comparative yield trial with thirty-six named varieties and numbered selections of potatoes was conducted at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station’s (AFES) Palmer Research Center during the 1987 growing season. The trial was conducted at the Matanuska Research Farm, located 6 miles west o f Palmer on Trunk Road. Nonirrigated trials have been conducted each year beginning in 1982, and irrigated trials were begun in 1985. Results of previous trials have been recorded in Circulars 49, 54, and 58, available at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station offices in Fairbanks and Palmer. Varieties with a history of commercial production in the Matanuska Valley (including 'Alaska 114', 'Bakeking', 'Green Mountain', 'Kennebec', and 'Superior') are included and serve as a comparative base for newly developed varieties, numbered selections, or older varieties that heretofore have not been tested at this location. Varieties that com pare favorably with the above-listed standards may warrant some consideration by commercial growers. Also included in this report are the results of abbreviated versions of the AFES potato yield trial that were conducted by cooperating individuals and agencies at nine locations throughout the state.
    • POTATO VARIETY PERFORMANCE ALASKA 1989

      Carling, D.E.; Westphale, P.C. (Palmer Research Center, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1990-02)
      A comparative yield trial with 45 named varieties and numbered selections of potatoes was conducted during the 1989 growing season at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station's (AFES) Palmer Research Center, Matanuska Research Farm, located six miles west of Palmer on Trunk Road. Nonirrigated trials have been conducted annually since 1982 and irrigated trials were begun in 1985. Results of previous trials are recorded in AFES Circulars 49, 54, 58, 65 and 71. These circulars are available at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station offices in Fairbanks and Palmer. Also included in this report are the results of abbreviated versions of the AFES potato yield trial that were conducted by cooperating individuals and agencies at six locations in Alaska. Varieties with a history of commercial production in the Matanuska Valley (including Alaska 114, Bake-King, Green Mountain and Superior) are included and serve as a comparative base for newly developed varieties, numbered selections or older varieties that have not been tested at this location. Varieties that compare favorably with the above listed standards may warrant consideration by commercial growers.
    • POTATO VARIETY PERFORMANCE IN THE MATANUSKA VALLEY 1982, 1983, 1984

      Carling, D.E.; Rissi, P. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1985-01)
      A program of field research relating to the commercial production o f potatoes was initiated in 1982 at the University of Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station ’s research center in Palmer. T he experimental fields are located at the Matanuska Research Farm on Trunk Road near Palmer. This program is a modified continuation of a potato research program initiated more than 30 years ago by D r. C .H . Dearborn. Whereas the major emphasis of D r. Dearborn ’s potato program w as variety development and testing, the major emphasis here is study o f general cultural practices, disease development and control, and the comparative evaluation (yield trials) o f potato varieties having commercial potential. Plans call for the comparative evaluation of thirty to forty named varieties or numbered selections each year. Varieties are selected for testing on the basis o f yield potential, general quality characteristics, and disease resistance. An attempt is made to include all varieties grow n commercially in the state, newly developed varieties from breeding program s in the U .S ., Canada, and elsewhere, as well as established varieties that have yet to be thoroughly tested in this environment. Commercial varieties with locally proven “ track record s ," such as Alaska 114, Bakeking, Green Mountain, and Superior will serve as a comparative base for m ore recently introduced varieites. New varieties will be tested for 4-5 years before being dropped , kept for further study, or recommended to commercial growers. Summarized in this circular are the results o f three years o f variety trials (1982, ’83, and ’84). Also included are summaries of environmental conditions at or near the experimental test site and some detailed information about several locally grown commercial varieties.
    • Potato Variety Performance, Alaska 1998

      Carling, D.E.; Boyd, M.A. (Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station; University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-02)
      A yield trial comparing 30 cultivars of potatoes (Solarium tuberosum L.) was conducted during the 1998 growing season at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment S tation ’s (AFES) Palm er Research Center, Matanuska Farm, located six miles west of Palmer, Alaska. A noteworthy change in design of this trial from previous years is the elim ination of a nonirrigated treatment. This change was made in response to grower requests that more emphasis be placed in other research areas. Also, the differences in yield between irrigated and nonirrigated studies, and thus the clear need for systems to supplement rainfall, has been well established by trial results from previous years.
    • Potato Variety Performance, Alaska 1999

      Carling, D.E. (Palmer Research Center, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2000-02)
      A yield trial comparing 30 cultivars of potatoes (Solatium tuberosum L.) was conducted during the 1999 growing season at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station’s (AFES) Palmer Research Center, Matanuska Farm, located six miles west of Palmer, Alaska. Similar to 1998, this trial included irrigated but not irrigated treatments. Data from previous studies has documented the consistent need for irrigation as well as the magnitude of increases in yield that can be realized through irrigation.
    • RAISING DAIRY CALVES AND HEIFERS IN ALASKA

      Sweetman, William J.; Middleton, Wallace R.; Swingle, Fred (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1951-05)
      Raise Your Calf Right— Feed your freshening cow / Take care of your freshening cow / Give ihe Calf a good place to live / Teach the calf to drink right away / Start your calf on grain early / Feed your calf roughage within 2 weeks. / Remember water and salt / Keep your heifers growing / -- Raise Your Calf Economically— Compare these rations: Whole milk, Skim milk, Skim milk powder, Gruel, Milk-Flo, Calf Manna, Calf meal / Follow recommended feeding program
    • Raising Orphan Reindeer Fawns Applied Reindeer Research Project

      Dieterich, Jamie K. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1989-12)
      Orphan reindeer fawns are often observed at summer handlings. Sometimes an abandoned fawn is found on the range. These fawns can be saved and raised for pets or for sale as live animals. There is an increasing demand for live reindeer to be shipped to locations outside Alaska. Tame reindeer adapted to a commercial diet can be a potential source of income for the herder as well as a rewarding project for the family. The following information is intended for reindeer herders in Alaska who do not have ready access to modem veterinary facilities or care.
    • RAPESEED PRODUCTION DEMONSTRATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA

      Arobio, E.L.; Quarberg, D.M.; Lewis, C.E.; Mitchell, G.A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1987-07)
      Rapeseed is the oil-bearing seed from plants of the Brassica genus. It grows well in the cooler agricultural regions o f the world and for this reason has long been thought to be a promising crop for interior Alaska. Rapeseed has been grow n in India and China for thousands and in Europe for hundreds o f years (Bolton 1980). Its history in North America began in 1943 when a small quantity of seed was imported into Canada. In recent years, its production has been largely that from cultivars bred for production of seed low in erucic acid and glucosinolate content. Seed from these cultivars is referred to by the Canadian Rapeseed Industry as canola. Its qualities are desirable in the edible-oil market, the largest market for products from canola seed. Canada is now one of the world’s largest producers and is the world’s largest exporter o f rapeseed. The meal that remains after oil extraction is high in protein and is used as a supplement in livestock feeds. The whole seed can also be used as a feed supplement. Some cultivars o f rapeseed that are high in erucic acid are also grow n for use in plastics and industrial oils (Genser and Eskin 1979). In addition, forage rapeseed cultivars can be used as livestock pasture. Research concerning the production of rapeseed has been addressed by the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) for several years. O f specific concern has been the selection of appropriate cultivars (Wooding et al. 1978), response to various nitrogen (N) rates, row spacings and seeding rates (Lewis and Knight 1987), performance in reduced-tillage systems in rotation with barley (Knight and Lewis 1986), the potential for frost seeding in late fall and early spring (Knight and Sparrow 1984) and response to boron (B) to enhance early seed ripening (Wooding 1985). In addition, in 1978 the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) began conducting seminars on production o f rapeseed for Alaskan farmers. In 1979 and 1980, CES employed Dr. J.L . Bolton, a rapeseed specialist from the University o f Alberta, in an extension capacity to give technical assistance to farmers on producing rapeseed (Bolton 1980).
    • Record Keeping for Reindeer Herds

      Clarke, Alex; Dieterich, Robert (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1990-06)
      Record keeping is an important tool in the management of any productive enterprise. In the area of reindeer herding, consistent and accurate record keeping can provide valuable information for making profitable herd management decisions. Making the right decisions can mean the difference between a non-productive herd and one that yields high profits. In this paper, it will be shown how keeping records can contribute to decision making and how computers can help the record keeping process.
    • Results from the 1989 Alaska Barley Breeding Program

      Dofing, S.M.; Blake, S.A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1990-06)
      The development of improved cultivars of barley is accomplished through comprehensive plant breeding programs. Such programs: 1). evaluate genetically-diverse germplasm in order to identify superiorperforming genotypes; 2). create new genetic recombinations from crosses or other means using selected parental genotypes; 3). evaluate segregating progeny from these families while exerting selection pressure for desirable characteristics; and 4). identify superior-performing cultivars in yield trials conducted at multiple locations over years. This circular documents the current status of research in cultivar development associated with the Alaska barley breeding program.
    • Results from the 1990 Alaska Barley Breeding Program

      Dofing, Stephen M.; Knight, Charles W.; Blake, Steve A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1991-02)
      The development of improved plant cultivars is accomplished through comprehensive plant breeding programs. Such programs: 1) evaluate genetically-diverse germplasm in order to identify superior-performing genotypes; 2) create new genetic recombinations from crosses or other means using selected parental genotypes; 3) evaluate segregating progeny from these families while exerting selection pressure for desirable characteristics; and 4) identify superior-performing genotypes in yield trials conducted in multiple environments. This circular documents the current status of research in cultivar development associated with the Alaska barley breeding program.
    • THE ROLE OF IRRADIATION IN FOOD PROCESSING: CAN IT BENEFIT ALASKA?

      Swanson, Ruthann B.; Lewis, Carol E.; Hok, Charlotte I.; Das, Debendra K.; Zarling, John P.; Workman, William G.; Logan, Robert R. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1988-03)
      Treatment of Alaska-produced food products by ionizing radiation may benefit the seafood and agricultural industries and the Alaskan consumer. A feasibility study to evaluate the potential social and economic benefits and risks as well as the costs of using the process in Alaska on Alaskan products is being coordinated by the Institute of Northern Engineering. A research and development project to determine effects on the quality o f Alaskan products could be the next phase in the introduction o f a new food-preservation technique to Alaska.
    • ROOT MAGGOTS IN ALASKA

      Washburn, Richard H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
      The turnip maggot, seed-corn maggot and onion maggot are the root maggots of economic importance in Alaska. They feed on crucifers, crucifers and other crops, and onions, respectively. The damage they cause can be materially lessened by properly timed applications of insecticide and certain cultural practices.
    • Some Characteristics of Anchorage and Fairbanks Households with special reference to retail food buying

      Gazaway, H.P.; Marsh, C.F. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-06)
      Anchorage and Fairbanks households are an important part of the Alaska market. These two cities are Alaska's largest, including about two-thirds of the total civilian population. -- Households in Anchoraqe and Fairbanks are somewhat larger, their members are younger, have had more schooling, own more appliances, buy more reading materials, and have higher incomes than average households in the South 48. -- Both cities are similar in roost characteristics. Anchorage has slightly more middle-sized families in the middle income bracket. Fairbanks has a few more in both the lowest and highest groupings. Average families are similar in size — 3.7 for Anchorage and 3.5 for Fairbanks. -- Anchorage homemakers have had more schooling than those in Fairbanks, but the difference is not great. Homemakers in both cities have a higher level of schooling than for the nation as a whole. -- Anchorage has more families employed by the government, althouqh government employment is high in both cities. Fairbanks has more employed in trades and construction. Both cities have about the same percentage employed in sales and clerical work, while less than 10 per cent in both cities are employed as laborers. -- Homemakers in both cities have lived in Alaska from 8 to 12 years. Less than 10 p»r cent are Alaska born. Three out of four came to Alaska from a state west of the Mississippi. Fairbanks families have lived in Alaska a little longer than those in Anchorage and a greater proportion plan to make Alaska their permanent home. -- Both Anchorage and Fairbanks households own m ore appliances than is common elsewhere. A greater proportion have T V 's, radios, refrigerators and deep-freezers. In Fairbanks 87 per cent of all families have telephones. -- Most Fairbanks homemakers shop for food specials. Nearly a half reported buying from 50 to 100 per cent of their food at special prices. More than a fourth reported buying from 25 to 50 per cent. -- Anchorage and Fairbanks households have modern buying habits and higher than average incomes. Merchants selling to them must provide quality merchandise and services with modern sales techniques.
    • A SUMMARY OF 1979 and 1980 SOIL FERTILITY RESEARCH IN THE DELTA -CLEARWATER AREA OF ALASKA

      Wooding, Frank J.; Mitchell, George A. Jr (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1981-04)
      During 1979 and 1980, soil fertility research was conducted at two locations in the Delta Clearwater area. One of the test sites, Lee F ett’s Farm, was cleared in the mid-1950s and has been in production for about 25 years. The other test site is situated on a tract of newly cleared land owned by Dennis Green. The new lands site was cleared by the traditional berm-pile method during the winter of 1978-79. This method removes much of the moss layer, and in some cases, part o f the topsoil. Land cleared by this procedure is lower in natural fertility, but has the advantage of enabling the farmer to plant a crop the first summer after clearing. In this publication, progress reports are given for several research projects involving fertilizer use and rates of application.
    • SUMMARY OF VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1978

      Dinkel, D.H.; Ginzton, L.M.; Wagner, P.J. (University of Alaska, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1978-12)
      This report summarizes the vegetable variety research evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1978 . Variety trials were conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station’s research farm. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to commercial and home garden growers. Varieties are chosen for inclusion in the variety tests on the basis o f their description, their latitude o f origin, and the record o f the plant-breeding program for producing kinds that have previously been found adapted. Standard recommended varieties are included for comparison. In the past, the vegetable variety evaluation program has been responsible for a continuous improvement in yields, quality, and dependability for m any vegetable crops. Our philosophy is to depend upon the m any existing plant-breeding programs instead of investing in an expensive, on-site, plant-breeding program. Progress can be made more rapidly by selection than by breeding.