• Potato Variety Performance, Alaska 1997

      Carling, D.E.; Boyd, M.A. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1998-01)
      A yield trial comparing 45 cultivars of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) was conducted during the 1997 growing season at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station’s (AFES) Palmer Research Center, Matanuska Farm, located six miles west of Palmer, Alaska. Varieties with a history of commercial production in the Matanuska Valley (Alaska 114, Bake-King, Green Mountain, and Superior) were included to serve as a comparative base for newly developed varieties or older named varieties that have not been tested at this location. Russet Burbank, the variety most widely grown in the United States, also was included to broaden the base of comparison although past trials have demonstrated its unsuitability for this area. Varieties that compare favorably with the above listed local standards may warrant consideration by commercial growers. Nonirrigated trials have been conducted annually since 1982 whereas irrigated trials were initiated in 1985. Results of these trials were published in AFES Circulars and are available at AFES offices.
    • Potato Variety Performance, Alaska 1998

      Carling, D.E.; Boyd, M.A. (Agricultural & Forestry Experiment Station; University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-02)
      A yield trial comparing 30 cultivars of potatoes (Solarium tuberosum L.) was conducted during the 1998 growing season at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment S tation ’s (AFES) Palm er Research Center, Matanuska Farm, located six miles west of Palmer, Alaska. A noteworthy change in design of this trial from previous years is the elim ination of a nonirrigated treatment. This change was made in response to grower requests that more emphasis be placed in other research areas. Also, the differences in yield between irrigated and nonirrigated studies, and thus the clear need for systems to supplement rainfall, has been well established by trial results from previous years.