• Alaskland Red Clover

      Hodgson, H.J.; Wilder, William B.; Osguthorpe, John E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
      Since fanning in Alaska first began and especially since dairy farming became the primary agricultural industry, there has existed a need for hardy legumes which would survive Alaska winters and produce satisfactory yields of high quality forage. To meet this need hundreds of legume species and strains have been introduced during the past 40 or more years. Almost all have lacked the necessary hardiness or have not been satisfactory agronomically. The release of Alaskland red clover in the spring of 1953 is the first time a hardy legume has been made available to growers in Alaska.
    • BETTER FORAGE FOR ALASKA: A PROGRESS REPORT

      Sweetman, William J.; Hodgson, H.J.; Mick, A.H. (Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of Alaska, 1950-06)
      Ih Alaska— Oats-and-peas make better silage than hay / Silage and silos pay / Field-choppers cut labor costs / Smooth bromegrass is an excellent forage / Alsike clover and Hubam sweetclover / make good annuals / Better forage means bigger profits
    • POLAR BROMEGRASS A NEW WINTERHARDY FORAGE FOR ALASKA

      Wilton, A.C.; Hodgson, H.J.; Klebesadel, L.J.; Taylor, R.L. (University of Alaska, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1966-05)
      SMOOTH bromegrass ( Bromus inermis Leyss.) is the principal perennial forage crop grown in Alaska. Despite this, none of the varieties developed elsewhere are sufficiently winterhardy for consistently good survival in most of the State. Approximately two-thirds of Alaska's perennial grass acreage is in the Matanuska-Susitna Valley area. In two seasons since 1956 there has been widespread winterkill of bromegrass fields in the Matanuska Valley. Nearly half of the planted acreage winterkilled during 1956-57 and again in 1961-62. In other years individual fields have shown winter injury. Polar bromegrass, a new improved variety, has consistently displayed outstanding winter hardiness and forage yields in experimental tests in Alaska.