• Annual Flower & Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1995

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyne, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1996-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation o f woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University o f Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64 51'N , 147°52'W). These evaluations w ere expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose o f this research is to identify hardy perennials capable o f surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential o f perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapes.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1993

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64051’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1994

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1995-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1996

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyhe, Eileen (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 1997-03)
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2000

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, 2001-01)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 2 June, 2000 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51/N, 147°52'W ). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 10-20-20S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet; 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants, and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2003

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Gardiner, Alfreda; Hill, Victoria; Van Wyhe, Eileen (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2003-12)
    • Annual Flower Plant Evaluations 1999

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Van Veldhuizen, Jacob; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Whye, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-11)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 4 June, 1999 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51N, 147°52W). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 1 0 -2 0 -2 0 S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet, 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2002

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2002-12)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2004

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-02)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2005

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant EM; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-02)
    • Annual Vegetable Evaluations 2004

      Baer, Zachary; Esmailka, Lauren; Reifenstuhl, Alexis; Gardener, Etta; Hanscom, Jan; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-05)
    • Annual Vegetable Evaluations 2005

      Matheke, Grant E. M.; Gardener, Etta; Holloway, Patricia S.; Hanscom, Janice T.; Garcia, Gretchen; Garroutte, Gretchen; Hogrefe, Justin (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-05)
    • Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1991

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64° 51' N, 147° 52' W). The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of these plants; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on hardy landscape plant materials by home owners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Perennial Plant Trials at the Georgeson Botanical Garden

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Wagner, Patricia J.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Gibson, Jane (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1998-12)
      Trials were begun in 1989 at the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147° 52’W, elevation 475 feet; 136 meters) to evaluate the hardiness and ornamental potential of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennial ornamentals. Woody ornamentals are tested for 10 years, and herbaceous perennials for five years. This report is the first summary of perennials that have survived the trial period with a winter hardiness rating between zero and 2.5. Each plant in the trial is evaluated annually for winter injury and rated on a scale of zero through four. A zero rating denotes no visible injury, and four is death. A score of 2.5 and lower indicates the plant grew well in the Garden. It may have shown symptoms of winter injury but recovered in subsequent seasons. The species and cultivars listed in Table 1 are recommended for further trial throughout Interior Alaska. Plants are grown on a south-facing slope in Fairbanks silt loam soil. The plots have been cultivated since about 1910. All plants receive full sun except those located in the shade house. Plants receive supplemental irrigation, mostly hand weeding, and an annual application of 500 lb per acre (560.5 kg/ha) 10-20-20S fertilizer. Lilies receive 1500 lb (1,681.5 kg/ha) per acre of the same fertilizer. No plant receives winter protection such as mulches, wind barriers or snow fences. Weather data are compiled annually from U.S. Weather Service station (elevation 475 feet; 136 meters) located approximately 350 feet (105 meters) west of the Garden. A summary of pertinent weather statistics is shown in Table 2.
    • A Survey of the Alaska Greenhouse Industry and Related Enterprises Results and Analysis

      Brown, Deborah M.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Kirts, Carla A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1986-02)
      A list of commercial greenhouses, nurseries, interiorscape businesses, landscape contractors, florist businesses, and variety stores that sell plant products was developed in order to determine the scope of the horticulture industry in Alaska. The list identified 155 greenhouse, nursery, and interiorscape businesses along with 304 landscape contractors, 80 florist businesses, and 41 variety stores that sell plants. A questionnaire was used to determine the status of these types of enterprises including location, square footage of facilities, source of heating and lighting for greenhouses, number and type of employees, products purchased and/or produced, and total gross sales. The number of businesses responding to this survey totaled 135 and included 54 greenhouses and/or nurseries, 4 interiorscape businesses, 44 landscape contractors, 19 florists, and 14 variety stores. More than half of the greenhouse, nursery, and interiorscape businesses were started after 1976, and 40.4 percent of the businesses began as a hobby that was expanded into a commercial enterprise. Nearly all of the greenhouse operations had Quonset or even-span gable greenhouses covered with corrugated fiberglass or double-layer polyethylene. Most greenhouses were heated with natural gas or heating oil. The businesses that responded had a total of 413,476 square feet (ft2) of year-round heated greenhouse space, 266,900 ft2 of seasonally heated space, and 18,369 ft2 of nonheated space. The most commonly grown crops were flower­ing annual and vegetable bedding plants. The number of employees at the businesses with greenhouses was 678: 152 year-round, full-time employees; 85 year-round, part-time employees; and 441 seasonal employees, 150 of whom were hired only during the transplanting season. The estimated number of jobs available statewide in greenhouse, nursery, and interiorscape businesses totaled 1,559. Forty-four percent of the businesses with greenhouses reported gross sales of less than $25,000, while 5 businesses exceeded $1 million in gross sales. The estimated total gross sales for greenhouse, nursery, and interiorscape businesses in Alaska was $24,387,500.
    • Vegetable Cultivar Trials 2003

      Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Alfreda (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2004-10)