• Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2004

      Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Fay, Barbara; Cook, Olga; Kerndt, Gretchen; Klammer, Nancy; Askelin, Marilyn; Munsell, Marsha; King, J. Dee; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-07)
    • Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2005

      King, J. Dee; Robertson, Heather; Waite, Maggie; Fay, Barbara; Hansen, Celese; Nutter, Moira; Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Haggland, Phyllis; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-03)
    • Gardening With Annual Flowers In Interior Alaska

      Wagner, Pat; Griffith, Marilyn; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1987-04)
      This list of recommended annual flower varieties includes information on several hundred annual flower cultivars. The recommended varieties were selected from flowers grown in 1985 and 1986 at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Farm at the University of Alaska- Fairbanks. While this is by no means a complete listing of varieties suitable for Interior gardens, it does reflect many years of experience in annual flower production at the AFES farm. The methods used to evaluate the flowers and definitions for terms used in the listing can be found under Data Collection.
    • Recommended Vegetable Varieties for Interior Alaska

      Wagner, Patricia; Matheke, Grant; Hemshrot, Steve (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1989-12)
    • SUMMARY OF VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1979

      Dinkel, D.H.; Wagner, P.J.; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1979-12)
      This report summarizes the vegetable variety evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1979. Variety trials were conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station’s research farm. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to commercial and home garden growers.Varieties are chosen for inclusion in the variety tests on the basis of their description, their latitude of origin, and the record o f the plant-breeding program for producing kinds that have previously been found adapted. Standard recommended varieties are included for comparison. In the past, the vegetable variety evaluation program has been responsible for a continuous improvement in yields, quality, and dependability for many vegetable crops. Our philosophy is to depend upon the many existing plant-breeding programs instead of investing in an expensive, on-site, plant-breeding program . Progress can be made more rapidly by selection than by breeding.
    • SUMMARY OF VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1980

      Dinkel, D.H.; Wagner, P.J.; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1980-12)
      This report summarizes the vegetable variety evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1980. Variety trials were conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station’s research farm. Additional potato variety trials were conducted at Delta Junction, Alaska. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to commercial and home-garden growers. Varieties are chosen for inclusion in the variety tests on the basis of their description, their latitiude of origin, and the record of the plant-breeding program for producing kinds that have previously been found adapted. Standard recommended varieties are included for comparison. In the past, the vegetable variety evaluation program has been responsible for a continuous improvement in yields, quality, and dependability for many vegetable crops. Our philosophy is to depend upon the many existing plant-breeding programs instead of investing in an expensive, on-site, plant-breeding program. Progress can be made more rapidly by selection than by breeding.
    • SUMMARY of VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1981

      Dinkel, D.H.; Wagner, P.J.; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska, 1982-01)
      This report summarizes the vegetable variety evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1981. Variety trials were all conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station’s research farm at Fairbanks. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of improved cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to both the commercial growers and home gardeners.
    • SUMMARY of VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1982

      Dinkel, D.H.; Wagner, P.J.; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1983-01)
      This report summarizes the vegetable variety evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1982. Variety trials were all conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station’s research farm at Fairbanks. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of improved cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to both the commercial growers and home gardeners.
    • SUMMARY of VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1983

      Wagner, P.J.; Matheke, Grant (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1984-01)
      This report summarizes the vegetable-variety evaluations of the Horticulture Department of the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, 1983. Variety trials were all conducted at the Agricultural Experiment Station's research farm at Fairbanks. The objective of this research is to select varieties of vegetables that are adapted to this environment. It also identifies types whose adaptability may be improved through development of improved cultural techniques. The selection effort is directed at finding varieties useful to both the commercial growers and home gardeners.
    • SUMMARY of VEGETABLE VARIETY TRIALS FAIRBANKS, ALASKA 1984

      Matheke, Grant; Wagner, P.J. (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1985-03)
    • Summary of Vegetable Variety Trials, Fairbanks, Alaska, 1978-1985

      Wagner, Patricia; Matheke, Grant; Dinkel, Donald H.; Griffith, Marilyn (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1989-01)
      Selection of the appropriate cultivar (cultivated variety, referred to as a variety hereafter) is a major factor in determining the success or failure of that crop for commercial growers and home gardeners. Plant breeding has brought about vast improvements in crop productivity by incorporating disease resistance, increased yield potential and environmental adaptability into new varieties. Because the environment and growing season in Interior Alaska are much different from most other agricultural regions, it is difficult to predict how a new variety will perform here without actual testing. For instance, the long hours of daylight during the growing season are used to advantage by such varieties as O–S Cross cabbage and Shogun broccoli, which grow to extremely large size. However, long days may cause some varieties of crops such as radishes, beets, spinach, carrots, cauliflower and Chinese cabbage to bolt (form flower stalks) before forming a usable product. Long days may delay fruiting with some varieties of winter squash and melons. Another important aspect of the climate is the amount of heat received during the growing season (approximately 90 frost–free days in Fairbanks). Many varieties of warm–season crops such as sweet corn, tomatoes, peppers, and melons may not mature here because insufficient heat is accumulated during the growing season, even though the growing season is potentially long enough. The use of cultural techniques such as clear polyethylene row covers to increase air temperatures may enable adapted varieties to reach maturity. Soil temperature is another important factor in the adaptability of vegetable varieties to our climate. The relatively cool soil temperatures (reaching a maximum of 70 degrees Fahrenheit) are adequate for good growth with cool–season crops (in general, crops where the stems, leaves, immature flower buds or roots are eaten — for example, broccoli, lettuce and carrots), but severely limit the growth of warm–season crops (crops where, in general, the fruit is eaten). With cultural techniques such as use of clear plastic mulch to raise soil temperatures, and the use of adapted varieties, many warm–season crops can be grown here.