• Annual Flower & Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1995

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyne, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1996-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation o f woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University o f Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64 51'N , 147°52'W). These evaluations w ere expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose o f this research is to identify hardy perennials capable o f surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential o f perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapes.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1993

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64051’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1994

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1995-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2000

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, 2001-01)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 2 June, 2000 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51/N, 147°52'W ). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 10-20-20S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet; 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants, and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Annual Flower Plant Evaluations 1999

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Van Veldhuizen, Jacob; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Whye, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-11)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 4 June, 1999 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51N, 147°52W). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 1 0 -2 0 -2 0 S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet, 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Growing Everbearing Strawberries as Annuals in Alaska

      Dinkel, Donald H.; Wagner, Patricia J.; Matheke, Grant E.M. (Agricultural Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1991-04)
      A technique for growing high-yielding, everbearing strawberries with clear polyethylene (plastic) mulch and row covers has been developed at the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station at Fairbanks. This technique eliminates the long delay from planting to fruiting that occurs with other culture systems and it has created an interest in commercial production and an increased home-garden effort in Alaska. The production system involves planting nursery plants each season as early as possible through clear polyethylene mulch, using row covers for the early part o f the season. Using this technique, harvest begins about July 15 and extends until freeze-up, com pared to a production season from about July 10 to July 28 for hardy types o f strawberries such as Toklat or Pioneer. This system produces clean fruit, easy to pick and relatively free from fruit rot. The harvest season can be extended in the fall by again using the row covers for frost protection.
    • Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1991

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64° 51' N, 147° 52' W). The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of these plants; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on hardy landscape plant materials by home owners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Perennial Plant Trials at the Georgeson Botanical Garden

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Wagner, Patricia J.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Gibson, Jane (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1998-12)
      Trials were begun in 1989 at the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147° 52’W, elevation 475 feet; 136 meters) to evaluate the hardiness and ornamental potential of trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennial ornamentals. Woody ornamentals are tested for 10 years, and herbaceous perennials for five years. This report is the first summary of perennials that have survived the trial period with a winter hardiness rating between zero and 2.5. Each plant in the trial is evaluated annually for winter injury and rated on a scale of zero through four. A zero rating denotes no visible injury, and four is death. A score of 2.5 and lower indicates the plant grew well in the Garden. It may have shown symptoms of winter injury but recovered in subsequent seasons. The species and cultivars listed in Table 1 are recommended for further trial throughout Interior Alaska. Plants are grown on a south-facing slope in Fairbanks silt loam soil. The plots have been cultivated since about 1910. All plants receive full sun except those located in the shade house. Plants receive supplemental irrigation, mostly hand weeding, and an annual application of 500 lb per acre (560.5 kg/ha) 10-20-20S fertilizer. Lilies receive 1500 lb (1,681.5 kg/ha) per acre of the same fertilizer. No plant receives winter protection such as mulches, wind barriers or snow fences. Weather data are compiled annually from U.S. Weather Service station (elevation 475 feet; 136 meters) located approximately 350 feet (105 meters) west of the Garden. A summary of pertinent weather statistics is shown in Table 2.