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Browsing Circulars by Issue Date

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Browsing Circulars by Issue Date

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  • Georgeson, C.C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1916)
    This circular is designed to give prospective settlers in Alaska, and particularly homesteaders, information on subjects which will be of more or less vital interest to them. It is designed also to call their attention ...
  • Georgeson, C.C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1928-10)
    The information in this circular is intended for the use of settlers and homesteaders in Alaska who are interested in the more general growing of hardy flowering bulbs in the Territory. Alaska is very poor in native ...
  • Langdale, Elizabeth H. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1932-04)
  • Higgins, F.L. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1933-05-31)
    Many requests for information regarding the best varieties of field crops for interior Alaska have been received by the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations. Field crops have- been tested by the stations in the ...
  • White, W.T. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1933-10)
    The information given in this circular is drawn from the experience of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations in handling their dairy herd at the Matanuska station and from other authoritative sources.
  • Ebert, W.J. (University of Alaska Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1945-11)
    Forage production for wintering livestock in Alaska has long been a problem where cleared land is limited. In the vicinity of the Knik Arm of Cook Inlet there are tide flats where native grasses grow in such abundance ...
  • Balloun, Stanley L. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1948)
    LAYING HENS PROVIDE a year-round income, utilize off-season labor, help build a permanent system o f agriculture in Alaska.
  • Edgar, Alfred D.; Irwin, Don (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1948-05)
    “P O T A T O E S are an important food in Alaska. Matanuska V alley farmers can produce enough to meet the needs of the Anchorage area if the crop can be kept satisfactorily from one year to the next. The Alaska ...
  • Chamberlin, Joseph C. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1949-06)
    In Alaska, as in every other agricultural area of the world, insect pests compete in many way with the farmer for the fruit of his labors. Under certain conditions many plants may be killed or consumed outright. More ...
  • Sweetman, William J.; Hodgson, H.J.; Mick, A.H. (Agricultural Experiment Stations, University of Alaska, 1950-06)
    Ih Alaska— Oats-and-peas make better silage than hay / Silage and silos pay / Field-choppers cut labor costs / Smooth bromegrass is an excellent forage / Alsike clover and Hubam sweetclover / make good annuals / Better ...
  • Litzenberger, S.C.; Bensin, B.M. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1951-04)
    Edda, an introduction from Sweden, was recommended for the first tim e in 195 I for all barley-growing areas of Alaska. About 200 bushels of this new barley variety were available for distribution to Alaska growers in ...
  • Sweetman, William J.; Middleton, Wallace R.; Swingle, Fred (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1951-05)
    Raise Your Calf Right— Feed your freshening cow / Take care of your freshening cow / Give ihe Calf a good place to live / Teach the calf to drink right away / Start your calf on grain early / Feed your calf ...
  • Dearborn, C.H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1952-05)
    Weed control studies at the Matanuska Experiment Station during the past two seasons have shown that many garden and field crops can be weeded satisfactorily with chemioals. Killing weeds with chemicals promises many ...
  • Washburn, Richard H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
    The turnip maggot, seed-corn maggot and onion maggot are the root maggots of economic importance in Alaska. They feed on crucifers, crucifers and other crops, and onions, respectively. The damage they cause can be ...
  • Hodgson, H.J.; Wilder, William B.; Osguthorpe, John E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
    Since fanning in Alaska first began and especially since dairy farming became the primary agricultural industry, there has existed a need for hardy legumes which would survive Alaska winters and produce satisfactory ...
  • Taylor, R.L.; Brinsmade, J.C. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1955-10)
    Developed from the hybrid Diamond x Khogot by the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Gasser wheat was released to seed producers in 1955. This variety exhibits an excellent combination of high yield and agronomic ...
  • Dearborn, C.H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-09)
    Alaska 114 was formally released to the Alaska Certified Seed G rowers Association in 1954 although it had been field tested by a few members during the preceding year. The selection was made from seedlings derived ...
  • Saunders, Dale; Hitchcock, Kay (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Stations, 1960-06)
    Selecting a suitable homestead is not simply finding a good piece of land to farm. Personal and social needs must be met, as well as those of farm oper­ations. Since each family has different standards, goals and needs, ...
  • Gazaway, H.P.; Marsh, C.F. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-06)
    Anchorage and Fairbanks households are an important part of the Alaska market. These two cities are Alaska's largest, including about two-thirds of the total civilian population. -- Households in Anchoraqe and Fairbanks ...
  • Wilton, A.C.; Hodgson, H.J.; Klebesadel, L.J.; Taylor, R.L. (University of Alaska, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1966-05)
    SMOOTH bromegrass ( Bromus inermis Leyss.) is the principal perennial forage crop grown in Alaska. Despite this, none of the varieties developed elsewhere are sufficiently winterhardy for consistently good survival in ...

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