• Air Transport of Alaskan Reindeer Applied Reindeer Research Project

      Dieterich, Robert A. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1989-12)
      This report describes one aspect of successful air transport developed over the past 20 years in Alaska
    • ALASKA 114 a tough-skinned main crop potato

      Dearborn, C.H. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-09)
      Alaska 114 was formally released to the Alaska Certified Seed G rowers Association in 1954 although it had been field tested by a few members during the preceding year. The selection was made from seedlings derived from a cross of Cobbler x Minnesota 13-1.
    • Alaska's Feeds for Alaska's Livestock

      Husby, Fred; Krieg, Ken (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1987-11)
    • Alaska's Multibooms

      Pearson, Roger W.; Rhoades, Edwin M.; Lewis, Carol E. (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1990-01)
      An assessment of Growth of Infrastructure Booms have been a common element in the development of frontier areas in the 19th and 20th centuries. Most commonly, the booms have been associated with resource development such as the mineral booms of the western United States. Booms usually involve some type of dramatic short- term change which has wide-ranging implications (Gilmore, 1976). Since the arrival of the Russians in Alaska, six major booms have occurred: furs, whales, salmon, minerals, military, and petroleum. Each of these booms has, to some degree, created changes in the landscape of Alaska, in particular, the infrastructural base, which in turn has facilitated subsequent development, either another major boom, or a smaller development. For example, agricultural development has been enhanced by mineral, military, and petroleum booms in Alaska. The cumulative impact on infrastructure of more than one boom, or multibooms, as it is referred to here, is the focus of this paper. One problem encountered in studying booms is that there is no general agreement on what constitutes a boom. Detailed studies of booms in communities such as Dixon’s (1978) analysis of Fairbanks and Gilmore’s multi-community work in the Great Plains—Rocky •mountain regions, contained no specific definition of the term “boom”. Yet it was clear in each study that something dramatic had occurred. More general historical studies of the Western mineral bonanzas (Greever, 1963) or the Klondike gold rush (Berton, 1958) likewise suggest a number of factors such as population rise, influx of money, resource extraction, and infrastructure expansion. But in each case, there is no specific factor or define rate of something that specifically qualifies a time period as a boom. In this study, we are concerned with dramatic change of events which have had a major impact on the geographic landscape of an area, As a framework for the initial study, we review those events which have been given attention as boom-type activities in the historical literature of Alaska (Rogers, 1962; Naske and Slotnick, 1987).
    • Alaska’s Reindeer Program 1986 Report of the University of Alaska Reindeer Program: 1986 Report the Applied Reindeer Research Project

      Epps, Alan C. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1987-07)
      The University o f Alaska-Fairbanks reindeer program has existed under its current organizational framework since 1981. Program guidance across the three functions o f research, extension, and instruction continues to meet with support both internal and external to the university. The program ’s user group, the Alaska Reindeer Herders Association, is an ideal Land Grant/Sea Grant recipient for such guidance. Several major issues outlined by the Reindeer Herders Association’s first five-year plan have been addressed during the past few years. In most cases the university’s input has helped to resolve the association’s concerns. Currently a new five-year plan is being developed, and the university’s reindeer program is responding by redirecting its efforts toward emerging issues. This report identifies recent accomplishments in the reindeer program , continuing efforts, and projected areas of future effort.
    • Alaskland Red Clover

      Hodgson, H.J.; Wilder, William B.; Osguthorpe, John E. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1953-02)
      Since fanning in Alaska first began and especially since dairy farming became the primary agricultural industry, there has existed a need for hardy legumes which would survive Alaska winters and produce satisfactory yields of high quality forage. To meet this need hundreds of legume species and strains have been introduced during the past 40 or more years. Almost all have lacked the necessary hardiness or have not been satisfactory agronomically. The release of Alaskland red clover in the spring of 1953 is the first time a hardy legume has been made available to growers in Alaska.
    • Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2004

      Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Fay, Barbara; Cook, Olga; Kerndt, Gretchen; Klammer, Nancy; Askelin, Marilyn; Munsell, Marsha; King, J. Dee; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-07)
    • Annual and Perennial Herb Evaluations 2005

      King, J. Dee; Robertson, Heather; Waite, Maggie; Fay, Barbara; Hansen, Celese; Nutter, Moira; Damron, Virginia; Rondine, Barbara; Wilson, George; Haggland, Phyllis; et al. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-03)
    • Annual Flower & Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1995

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyne, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1996-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation o f woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University o f Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64 51'N , 147°52'W). These evaluations w ere expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose o f this research is to identify hardy perennials capable o f surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential o f perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapes.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1993

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1994-05)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64051’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1994

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Berry, Sally; Barbour, Edie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1995-02)
      In 1989, a systematic evaluation of woody and herbaceous perennial landscape plants was begun at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51’N, 147°52’W). These evaluations were expanded to include annual flowers in 1992 and ferns in 1993. The purpose of this research is to identify hardy perennials capable of surviving in subarctic environments; to evaluate the ornamental potential of perennials and annuals; and to fulfill a growing demand for information on landscape plant materials by homeowners, commercial growers, and landscapers.
    • Annual Flower and Perennial Landscape Plant Evaluations 1996

      Wagner, Patricia J.; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Wyhe, Eileen (School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 1997-03)
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2000

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, 2001-01)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 2 June, 2000 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51/N, 147°52'W ). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 10-20-20S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet; 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants, and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Annual Flower Evaluations 2003

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Gardiner, Alfreda; Hill, Victoria; Van Wyhe, Eileen (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2003-12)
    • Annual Flower Plant Evaluations 1999

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E.M.; Van Veldhuizen, Jacob; MacDonald, Theresa; Van Whye, Eileen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-11)
      The annual flower trials were planted from 30 May through 4 June, 1999 in the Perennial Landscape and All America Selections Display Garden of the Georgeson Botanical Garden (64°51N, 147°52W). Fairbanks silt loam soil was fertilized with 1 0 -2 0 -2 0 S (4 lbs per 100 sq feet, 195 g per sq meter) on 28 May. With the exception of dahlias, all flowers were grown as seedling transplants and were hardened off outdoors for one week prior to transplanting. Tuberous roots of dahlias were planted in containers five weeks prior to transplanting and were hardened off.
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2002

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2002-12)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2004

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant E. M.; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-02)
    • Annual Flowering Plant Evaluations 2005

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Gardiner, Etta; Matheke, Grant EM; Hanscom, Jan; Van Wyhe, Eileen; Hill, Victoria (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-02)
    • Annual Vegetable Evaluations 2004

      Baer, Zachary; Esmailka, Lauren; Reifenstuhl, Alexis; Gardener, Etta; Hanscom, Jan; Holloway, Patricia S.; Matheke, Grant E. M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2005-05)
    • Annual Vegetable Evaluations 2005

      Matheke, Grant E. M.; Gardener, Etta; Holloway, Patricia S.; Hanscom, Janice T.; Garcia, Gretchen; Garroutte, Gretchen; Hogrefe, Justin (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, Georgeson Botanical Garden, 2006-05)