• NOTES ON Marketing Perishables from Fringe Areas of Western Canada

      Johnson, Hugh A. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Alaska, 1951-11)
    • Forage Crops in Alaska

      Klebesadel, L.J. (University of Alaska School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management Agricultural Experiment Station, 1983-12)
      Forage crops can be defined as the aboveground growth (stems, leaves, and sometimes seed heads and immature seeds) of plants that are gathered and fed to herbivorous, domestic animals. Similar plant growth that is grazed directly by livestock in rotational or permanent pastures, but on a less extensive basis than rangelands, is also considered in this discussion. For the most part, forage crops are herbaceous (nonwoody) members of two large plant families—grasses and legumes. The grass family world-wide numbers about 5,000 species, but only about three dozen of these are important as forages. The legume family includes more than 12,000 species world-wide, fewer than 20 of which are considered to be important forage crops.
    • Soil Survey and Its Use in Alaska

      Ping, Chien-Lu (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1985-08)
      Soils have been surveyed in various parts of Alaska to meet resource -development needs since territorial days. These surveys have been conducted and published by the National Cooperative Soil Survey since 1952 and are a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service and the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station. Initially, government agencies were the major users of such soil surveys because land ownership was controlled almost entirely by government agencies. However, the demand for soils and geographic information increased substantially as population increased and urban areas grew following the discovery of oil on the Kenai Peninsula during the 1950s and on the North Slope in the late 1960s. Interest also heightened when the state gained titles to a large portion of land following statehood in 1959. The National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS) published many soil surveys for areas of intensive land use or potential land development. These soil surveys often are underutilized or misused. This publication, "Soil Survey and Its Use in Alaska," was developed over three years based on my field reviews of NCSS activities in Alaska as well as on my discussions with users of soil surveys regarding questions and problems arising from using the reports. In this publication, soil surveys and their use in Alaska are reviewed and discussed.
    • Caring for Black or White Spruce Christmas Trees

      Malone, Tom; Richmond, Allen P. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1988)
    • Why Do We Farm in Alaska?

      Greene, Barbara E. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-05)
    • ALASKA AGRICULTURAL TOURS: Chena Hot Springs Road

      Lewis, Carol E.; Pearson, Roger W. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-12)
      Entrance to the Chena Hot Springs Road is only 5 miles from downtown Fairbanks. The road provides an excellent opportunity to see an example o f the diversity of agricultural production in the Tanana Valley.
    • Palmer Research Center

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1993-11
      The Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, operates the Palmer Research Center. Included are offices and laboratory facilities in Palmer and the Matanuska Experiment Farm outside of Palmer. Researchers at these locations solve problems related to agriculture, forestry and the environment. State and federal agencies, private industry and the university sponsor and fund the research.
    • Alaska Research Natural Areas. 4: Big Windy Hot Springs

      Juday, Glenn Patrick (University of Alaska Fairbanks. School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1998)
      The 65 ha Big Windy Hot Springs Research Natural Area (RNA) in the Steese National Conservation Area of central Alaska is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. It contains a vent that issues hot water at about 61° C flowing at about 8 liters per minute from the largest of a system of small springs and seeps. Geothermal water seeping over the face of a cliff has intensely weathered the local granitic bedrock into gruss. The fracture of massive boulders from the possibly fault-related cliff is one of the most distinctive features of the RNA. Small boulders from the cliff have fallen into Big Windy Creek where they have been caught in the swirling current of Big Windy Creek and ground potholes into the bed of the high-gradient stream. Big Windy Creek is constricted to a narrow canyon. The main geothermal pools are lined with thermophytic algal and cyanobacteria mats. Undescribed high-temperature aquatic species may be present. geothermal heat in the vicinity of the main vents promotes a lush growth of vegetation including Phalaris arundinacea and Ranunculus cymbalaria, two species that occur here north of their previously reported distribution in Alaska. The RNA contains contrasting north- and south-facing canyon slopes. Diffuse geothermal heating of soil around the vents is associated with a large and productive mature white spruce forest on the south-facing slope. A paper birch forest with a minor white spruce component covers most of the south-facing slope. The north-facing slope is underlain with permafrost; areas of boulder talus are subjected to periglacial weathering processes. Low paper birch forest, black spruce woodland, and dwarf birch tundra provide the main vegetation cover. The lowland east-central Alaska region has experienced a strong climate warming trend since the late 1970s. Radial growth of white spruce at Big Windy Hot Springs is generally negatively related to summer temperature. The Big Windy Hot Spring site is a mineral lick heavily used by a local population of Dall sheep that roam from nearby alpine habitats into the RNA. A collection of the water shrew (Sorex palustris) in the RNA is several hundred km from other known populations and is the new northern limit for the species in North America.
    • Alaska Spinach: Savory, Succulent Salad Selection

      Lewis, Carol E.; Holloway, Pat; Matheke, Grant (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1999)
      Spinach salad is a new, exciting choice for the table! There is an increasing use of a variety of greens in salads by U.S. consumers, spinach among them. The fresh quality demanded by Alaska consumers could be met by Alaska producers from June through August if a spinach cultivar that did not bolt early in the season could be identified. For the past 30 years, horticulturists at the Fairbanks Experiment Farm, now a part of the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, have tested spinach cultivars looking for a cultivar that will not bolt early in the growing season.
    • ALASKA HOT DOGS: OUR DOGS ARE TOP DOGS

      Lewis, Carol E.; Geier, Hans (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-10)
      Sausages, one of the oldest forms of processed food, are a means of using and preserving animal trimmings. The hot dog is a specialized sausage. It originated in Germany where it was named “dachshund” sausage because it looked like the popular badger (dachs) hound (hund). The U.S. hot dog originated at the Polo Grounds in New York. Vendors hawked dachshund sausages in buns while a sports cartoonist sketched a barking dachshund nestled warmly in a bun. He labeled the cartoon “hot dog”. Today the hot dog enjoys popularity throughout the world.
    • The Alaska Public Land Planning Directory

      Todd, Susan (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2001-12)
    • Faculty, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences: fostering creativity

      School of Natural Resources & Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003
    • Working for Alaskans: a wealth of knowledge

      School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2003
      This publication highlights some of the research, instruction, and outreach programs of the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (SNRAS). If you are acquainted with us, you will notice our name change and the recent addition of the geography department. Our research arm remains the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station to assure you of continued research and outreach programs that include traditional agricultural production and forest management.
    • Careers: Natural Resources Management, Agriculture and Horticulture, Environmental Science, Forest Science, Geography

      School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003
      There’s a strong and growing job market for technicians, managers, scientists, and educators in the natural resource arena. Completing one of the degrees offered by our school will prepare you to work in such fields as natural resource management, agriculture, horticulture, watershed science, geography, fishery and wildlife biology, land use planning, forest biology or management, resource economics, outdoor recreation, tourism, and rangeland science and ecology.
    • Shapeshifter carbon - a universal building block

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004)
      The behavior of carbon in northern ecosystems and effects related to warming are under study at the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    • Reindeer Inspire: New Teaching Guide

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004)
      When Elsa the reindeer first stepped into the classroom, handler Greg Finstad had no idea where that first educational excursion would lead. Now, five years later, the Reindeer Research Program (RRP) has published Reindeer Roundup! A K-12 Educator's Guide to Reindeer in Alaska. Development of the curriculum, complete with book, CD-ROM, and instructional kit, was supported by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Agriculture Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service, and the UAF College of Rural Alaska, with considerable support also coming from the SNRAS Reindeer Research Program.
    • Basic Science Poster Design: A Short Guide

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004
    • Birch: white gold in the boreal forest

      Helfferich, Deirdre (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004)
    • Students Afield! Natural Resources Management 290

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004
    • Peony - A Future Crop for Alaska?

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources & Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004)