• Agronomic Crops Developed in Alaska

      Van Veldhuizen, Bob M.; Zhang, Mingchu; Knight, Charles W. (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2014)
    • ALASKA AGRICULTURAL TOURS: Chena Hot Springs Road

      Lewis, Carol E.; Pearson, Roger W. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1992-12)
      Entrance to the Chena Hot Springs Road is only 5 miles from downtown Fairbanks. The road provides an excellent opportunity to see an example o f the diversity of agricultural production in the Tanana Valley.
    • Alaska Berries

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009
    • Alaska Heat: wildland fire research and management issues

      Fitzgerald, Doreen (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005)
    • ALASKA HOT DOGS: OUR DOGS ARE TOP DOGS

      Lewis, Carol E.; Geier, Hans (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1999-10)
      Sausages, one of the oldest forms of processed food, are a means of using and preserving animal trimmings. The hot dog is a specialized sausage. It originated in Germany where it was named “dachshund” sausage because it looked like the popular badger (dachs) hound (hund). The U.S. hot dog originated at the Polo Grounds in New York. Vendors hawked dachshund sausages in buns while a sports cartoonist sketched a barking dachshund nestled warmly in a bun. He labeled the cartoon “hot dog”. Today the hot dog enjoys popularity throughout the world.
    • The Alaska Public Land Planning Directory

      Todd, Susan (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 2001-12)
    • Alaska Regional Climate Projections

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009
    • Alaska Research Natural Areas. 4: Big Windy Hot Springs

      Juday, Glenn Patrick (University of Alaska Fairbanks. School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1998)
      The 65 ha Big Windy Hot Springs Research Natural Area (RNA) in the Steese National Conservation Area of central Alaska is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. It contains a vent that issues hot water at about 61° C flowing at about 8 liters per minute from the largest of a system of small springs and seeps. Geothermal water seeping over the face of a cliff has intensely weathered the local granitic bedrock into gruss. The fracture of massive boulders from the possibly fault-related cliff is one of the most distinctive features of the RNA. Small boulders from the cliff have fallen into Big Windy Creek where they have been caught in the swirling current of Big Windy Creek and ground potholes into the bed of the high-gradient stream. Big Windy Creek is constricted to a narrow canyon. The main geothermal pools are lined with thermophytic algal and cyanobacteria mats. Undescribed high-temperature aquatic species may be present. geothermal heat in the vicinity of the main vents promotes a lush growth of vegetation including Phalaris arundinacea and Ranunculus cymbalaria, two species that occur here north of their previously reported distribution in Alaska. The RNA contains contrasting north- and south-facing canyon slopes. Diffuse geothermal heating of soil around the vents is associated with a large and productive mature white spruce forest on the south-facing slope. A paper birch forest with a minor white spruce component covers most of the south-facing slope. The north-facing slope is underlain with permafrost; areas of boulder talus are subjected to periglacial weathering processes. Low paper birch forest, black spruce woodland, and dwarf birch tundra provide the main vegetation cover. The lowland east-central Alaska region has experienced a strong climate warming trend since the late 1970s. Radial growth of white spruce at Big Windy Hot Springs is generally negatively related to summer temperature. The Big Windy Hot Spring site is a mineral lick heavily used by a local population of Dall sheep that roam from nearby alpine habitats into the RNA. A collection of the water shrew (Sorex palustris) in the RNA is several hundred km from other known populations and is the new northern limit for the species in North America.
    • Alaska Spinach: Savory, Succulent Salad Selection

      Lewis, Carol E.; Holloway, Pat; Matheke, Grant (University of Alaska Fairbanks. Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, 1999)
      Spinach salad is a new, exciting choice for the table! There is an increasing use of a variety of greens in salads by U.S. consumers, spinach among them. The fresh quality demanded by Alaska consumers could be met by Alaska producers from June through August if a spinach cultivar that did not bolt early in the season could be identified. For the past 30 years, horticulturists at the Fairbanks Experiment Farm, now a part of the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, University of Alaska Fairbanks, have tested spinach cultivars looking for a cultivar that will not bolt early in the growing season.
    • Assessing Climate Change: Did We Get It Right?

      Juday, Glenn Patrick (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2006-01)
    • Basic Science Poster Design: A Short Guide

      Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004
    • Birch: white gold in the boreal forest

      Helfferich, Deirdre (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2004)
    • Careers: Natural Resources Management, Agriculture and Horticulture, Environmental Science, Forest Science, Geography

      School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003
      There’s a strong and growing job market for technicians, managers, scientists, and educators in the natural resource arena. Completing one of the degrees offered by our school will prepare you to work in such fields as natural resource management, agriculture, horticulture, watershed science, geography, fishery and wildlife biology, land use planning, forest biology or management, resource economics, outdoor recreation, tourism, and rangeland science and ecology.
    • Caring for Black or White Spruce Christmas Trees

      Malone, Tom; Richmond, Allen P. (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1988)
    • Checklist of Landscape Plant Materials for the Tanana Valley

      Holloway, Patricia S.; Wagoner, Patricia J. (School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005)
    • Conversion of a gasolinepowered 1955 Allis Chalmers 'G' tractor to battery power

      Smeenk, Jeff; Ericksen, Jim (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2010)
      The Allis Chalmers ‘G’ tractors have long been favorites with market gardeners because the model combines excellent toolbar visibility, overall maneuverability, and good fuel economy in a relatively simple mechanical design. Unfortunately, the tractor’s small size and unique style make it a prime target for tractor collectors. This means that buying repair parts for the model ‘G’s can be expensive, since the suppliers cater to the hobbyist-restoration market rather than those using the machines on working farms. Conversion of the tractor to electric power eliminates the excessive costs involved in repairing the engine with original parts. The farmer who originally converted a conventional Allis Chalmers ‘G’ to a solar-powered cultivating tractor received partial funding through a Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Grant. He was very happy with the re-powered tractor and developed a website describing both the process of conversion and the resulting tractor (www.flyingbeet.com). The conversion of an Allis Chalmers ‘G’ to an electric (and ultimately solar-powered) cultivating tractor provides several benefits for the University of Alaska’s Matanuska Experiment Farm: ▷▷ 1) The Agricultural Experiment Station plays a leadership role in developing sustainable farming practices appropriate for Alaska, and using a tractor that does not operate on limited fossil fuels provides a working example of sustainable agricultural practices. ▷▷ 2) Among other duties, the tractor is used to cultivate inside 30’ x 96’ high tunnels where carbon monoxide would be a hazard to the operator. ▷▷ 3) The price of the conversion kit was only slightly more expensive than a replacement gasoline engine, and repair of the electric engine is considerably cheaper than repair of the gasoline engine.
    • Dragonhead mint (Dracocephalum parviflorum Nutt.) as a potential agronomic crop for Alaska

      Van Veldhuizen, Bob; Knight, Charlie (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2006)
      This study investigates dragonhead mint (Dracocephalum parviflorum Nutt.) for its potential as an ingredient in commercially sold food for wild birds.
    • An Economic Background for Alaska Flower Growers

      Auer, James D.; Greenberg, Joshua (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2009-06)
    • Exotic Plants in Alaska's Parks

      McKee, Chris (Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2005)
    • Faculty, School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences: fostering creativity

      School of Natural Resources & Agricultural Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003