• Herd Management Tips to Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, Palmer, Alaska, 1956-01)
    • The Position of Agriculture in Alaska's Current Economy

      Johnsons, Hugh A.; Irwin, Don L. (University of Alaska, 1953-01)
      This report is designed to explain some of the apparent discrepancies in the agricultural picture in Alaska.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairy Breeders

      Sweetman, William J. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1961-01)
      Until mid-1957 most dairymen were expanding their herds. Many old animals were kept that were difficult to breed. When a military market failed to materialize in 1957, many of these unsatisfactory cows were the first to be culled. This culling accounts in part for the improvement in conception rates beginning in late 1957. Other contributing factors were better communications and roads, possibly better insemination skills, and more important the economic squeeze that forced operators to watch more carefully for heat periods.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1958-02)
      In 1957 the conception rate has run about the same as in past years, except that August was the lowest month for the year. The figures show that 81% of the cows conceived on their first two services and nearly 92% on their first three services. Only 97 cows out of 1,177 required more than three services. This is about the percentage would would be expected. Usually some of these difficult cows will get with calf and some of them never will.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1957-01)
      The Matanuska Valley dairy industry continues to be plagued with the problem of having more milk than can be distributed in early summer, while fall production does not supply the demand. Fluctuations between heavy summer production and low production during September, October and November are difficult to control. Cows calving normally in the spring drop off so fast beginning in late August that they are ruined for fall and winter production. For this reason, the Experiment Station has advocated breeding heifers so they will calve in late July, August and September. This means they must conceive from early October through December. Breeding should begin about October 1. It is almost impossible to change the calving dates of a herd except by starting replacements at the right time.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1959-03)
      This has been a good year in getting cows with calf. Begining in April, 1958, 89.6 per cent of all cows conceived on the first two services. This is an exceptionally good rate . Only 99 cows needed servicing four times or more—8.4 per cent of the total. This is lower than average far several years, and is lower than in many breeding associations in the other States.
    • Progress Report for Alaska's Dairymen

      Sweetman, William J. (University of Alaska, Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station, 1960-02)