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dc.contributor.authorHelm, Dorothy J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-20T22:42:06Z
dc.date.available2013-09-20T22:42:06Z
dc.date.issued1990-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/2246
dc.description.abstractLong-term goals of revegetation include the reestablishment of diverse, self-reproducing plant communities suitable for desired post-mining land uses. In Alaska, these uses include habitat for moose and other wildlife. Current state and federal revegetation regulations affect only coal-mined lands, but some mine operators have been revegetating their lands voluntarily. Regulations requiring revegetation may affect other types of mines in the near future. Revegetation of mined lands or other disturbed lands helps control soil erosion, which traditionally has been controlled by grass cover. However, vigorous grass growth may interfere with woody plant regeneration needed by wildlife for thermal cover, browse, and hiding cover. Growth of plant species varies in different soils because of the biological, physical, and chemical properties of the individual soils. Biological components of soils are often overlooked even when the physical and chemical properties of soils are considered. The potential advantages and disadvantages of planting certain species in certain types of soils are examined in this study.en_US
dc.publisherAgricultural and Forestry Experiment Station, School of Agriculture and Land Resources Management, University of Alaska Fairbanksen_US
dc.titleReestablishment of Woody Browse Species for Mined Land Reclamation Year 1 (1989) Resultsen_US
dc.title.alternativeResearch Progress Report, No. 12en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-24T13:46:40Z


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