• Alaska Department of Corrections: Admissions and Population, 2004–2013

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on admissions to, and confined populations in, the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2004 to 2013, focusing on incarcerated populations and rates, in both in-state and out-of-state facilities, as well as populations and rates in special supervision programs such as Community Residential Centers (CRCs) and electronic monitoring (EM). Data was compiled using the annual DOC Offender Profile publications for 2004 to 2013.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Institutional Populations, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-09-08)
      This fact sheet presents data on institutional populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) based on their status in the criminal justice system from 2005 to 2014. Probation and parole populations are excluded unless they have violated the terms of their release and been returned to incarceration; individuals on non-criminal holds are also excluded. Data was extracted from the Alaska Corrections Offender Management System (ACOMS).
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Post-conviction Incarcerated Population, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on post-conviction incarcerated populations in both in-state or out-of-state institutions supervised by Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2005–2014. The Fact Sheet focuses on post-conviction incarcerated populations by crime classifications and crime categories overall and within gender. This fact sheet does not include pretrial populations or populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) in non-institutional programs.
    • Alaska Sex Offender Recidivism and Case Processing Study: Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      Part I of this report provides updated estimates of Alaska sex offender recidivism, expanding the post-inarceration follow-up period from two years (as used in previous studies) to seven years in order to better understand sex offender desistance from crime. Study data was obtained from the Alaska Department of Corrections and the Alaska Department of Public Safety. The initial analysis sample included all persons who were convicted of one or more registerable sexual offenses and subsequently released from incarceration between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. Of the 433 persons who met this critera, 27 died after release from institutional custody, leaving 406 sex offenders in the final analysis sample. In Part II of this report, data on individuals arrested at least once for the commission of one or more registerable sex offenses from 2008 to 2011 — a total of 1,179 individual suspects — were extracted from the criminal justice data repository maintained by the Alaska Department of Public Safety. This data was analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and completeness of Alaska’s criminal history repository data on sex offenses and to explore the quality of those data for examining case processing of misdemeanor and felony offenses.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Alcohol or Illegal Drugs, 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-21)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on numbers of trauma admissions, patient demographics, and the presence of alcohol or illegal drugs in trauma admissions in 2014. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Firearms, 2009-2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on characteristics of trauma admissions for the period 2009–2014 for injuries for which a firearm was the main mechanism of injury. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Arrests for Drug Offenses in Alaska: 2000–2011

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-09)
      This fact sheet presents data for 2000–2011 on arrests for drug offenses made by Alaska police agencies. The report presents drug offense arrest information for both adults and juveniles for the 12-year period, including number of drug offense arrests, drug offense arrests as a percentage of all arrests, drug offense arrest rate, and drug offense types. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Arrests for Violent Crimes in Alaska, 1980-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Department of Public Safety’s annual report Crime in Alaska for the years 1980 through 2012 (the last year for which data are available) on violent crime arrests in Alaska. Crime in Alaska represents the State of Alaska’s contribution to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s national Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program. The UCR program collects data from law enforcement agencies across the United States. (In 2012 more than 18,000 agencies participated in the UCR program.) The UCR includes in its count of arrests all arrests, citations, and summonses for 28 different offenses. Presented here are Alaska arrest data for four offenses known as Part I violent offenses: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter (homicide), forcible rape (rape), robbery, and aggravated assault.
    • Burglary in Alaska: 1985–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1985–2012 on the property crime of burglary, including burglary rates, time and place of occurrence, and the value of property stolen during burglaries reported to police. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1985-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the use of firearms in the commission of three violent crimes — homicide (murder and nonnegligent homicide), robbery, and aggravated assault — in the U.S. and Alaska from 1985 to 2012. Data on the use of knives and other cutting instruments, strong-arm tactics, and other weapons in the commission of these crimes are also presented.
    • Homicide in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data reported on homicides in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Over the 30-year period from 1986 to 2015, homicide rates decreased in Alaska overall, but increased in the Municipality of Anchorage. The Fact Sheet also presents data on the most commonly used weapons in homicides, victim-offender relationships, and clearance rates for homicides.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals and Charges in Alaska, FY 2006–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-02-02)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals and charges in the Alaska juvenile justice system for state fiscal years 2006–2015, including: the total number of referrals made to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) by law enforcement, the total number of charges by class and offense type, and the number of unique juveniles referred to DJJ. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals in Alaska, 2003-2013

      Parker, Khristy; Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals made by Alaska law enforcement agencies to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for for state fiscal years 2003–2013. The report presents data on the number of juveniles referred to DJJ, number of referrals made, charges by class and offense type, and demographic information on referred juveniles. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Property Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on property crime in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Property crime" is an aggregate category that includes burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft crimes. From 1986 to 2015 the property crime rate in Alaska decreased as the overall crime rate decreased. On average, property crime accounted for two-thirds of all crime in Alaska over the thirty-year period.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-08)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1982–2012 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska, including size of law enforcement agencies by number of employed personnel, police-citizen ratio, ratio of sworn officers to civilian employees, and employment of women as sworn officers. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.