• Alaska Criminal Justice Operating Budgets, 2001-2013

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-07)
      This fact sheet presents data on the fiscal year operating budgets enacted by the Alaska Legislature for six key criminal justice agencies from state fiscal years 2001 to 2013. These agencies include the Department of Corrections, Department of Public Safety, Alaska Court System, Division of Juvenile Justice, Criminal Divison of the Department of Law, and Legal and Advocacy Services within the Department of Administration (including the Office of Public Advocacy, the Public Defender Agency, and the Violent Crimes Compensation Board). The budget information presented reflects appropriations rather than actual agency expenditures. Operating budget data was extracted from appropriation bills enacted by the Alaska Legislature and published by the Alaska Office of Management and Budget. The inflation-adjusted data show sizable increases in the amount of funding allocated for each of the six agencies from FY 2001 to FY 2013, but the overall percentage of statewide operating budget funds dedicated to criminal justice remained relatively steady.
    • Alaska Criminal Statute Conversion Tables for Use with Alaska Criminal Statute Reference Guide and the Alaska OBTS Database

      Barnes, Allan R.; Watson, Julie R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-11)
      These conversion tables are designed for use with the Alaska Offender-Based Transaction Statistics (OBTS) database and the Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide. The purpose of the tables is to allow users of printed versions of the "Guide" to quickly convert Alaska Statutes to their corresponding National Criminal Information Center (NCIC), Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), Alaska OBTS, and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) codes. (The tables are not required for use with the computerized version of the Guide.) The tables reflect legislative changes in Alaska Statutes through 1997, but are no longer updated.
    • Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide

      Barnes, Allan R.; Watson, Julie R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-11)
      This guide provides cross-references between Alaska criminal statutes and National Criminal Information Center (NCIC), Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), Alaska OBTS, and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) codes. The guide also includes brief annotations of each statute. The guide is also available in a computerized version. An accompanying volume, Conversion Tables for Use with the Alaska OBTS Database and the Alaska Criminal Statute Cross-Reference Guide, is designed for use with printed versions of the guide. The guide reflects legislative changes in Alaska Statutes through 1997, but is no longer updated.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Admissions and Population, 2004–2013

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on admissions to, and confined populations in, the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2004 to 2013, focusing on incarcerated populations and rates, in both in-state and out-of-state facilities, as well as populations and rates in special supervision programs such as Community Residential Centers (CRCs) and electronic monitoring (EM). Data was compiled using the annual DOC Offender Profile publications for 2004 to 2013.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Institutional Populations, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-09-08)
      This fact sheet presents data on institutional populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) based on their status in the criminal justice system from 2005 to 2014. Probation and parole populations are excluded unless they have violated the terms of their release and been returned to incarceration; individuals on non-criminal holds are also excluded. Data was extracted from the Alaska Corrections Offender Management System (ACOMS).
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Post-conviction Incarcerated Population, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on post-conviction incarcerated populations in both in-state or out-of-state institutions supervised by Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2005–2014. The Fact Sheet focuses on post-conviction incarcerated populations by crime classifications and crime categories overall and within gender. This fact sheet does not include pretrial populations or populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) in non-institutional programs.
    • Alaska Offender Profile: Adult Probation/Parole, 2002–2012

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on characteristics of offenders under the supervision of the Alaska Department of Corrections, Division of Probation and Parole (DOC-PP) for the period 2002–2012, and briefly describes how probation and parole operate in Alaska. Data were extracted from the annual Offender Profile publication of the Alaska Department of Corrections. Data presented include total numbers of adult probationers and parolees, rates of adult probation/parole supervision, percentage breakdowns of the probation/parole population by sex and race, and distribution of probation/parole cases among the three largest DOC-PP offices. There has been a notable increase in the total number of persons subject to probation/parole supervision in Alaska over the 11-year period, but this increase has not outpaced the state’s population growth.
    • Alaska Sex Offender Recidivism and Case Processing Study: Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      Part I of this report provides updated estimates of Alaska sex offender recidivism, expanding the post-inarceration follow-up period from two years (as used in previous studies) to seven years in order to better understand sex offender desistance from crime. Study data was obtained from the Alaska Department of Corrections and the Alaska Department of Public Safety. The initial analysis sample included all persons who were convicted of one or more registerable sexual offenses and subsequently released from incarceration between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. Of the 433 persons who met this critera, 27 died after release from institutional custody, leaving 406 sex offenders in the final analysis sample. In Part II of this report, data on individuals arrested at least once for the commission of one or more registerable sex offenses from 2008 to 2011 — a total of 1,179 individual suspects — were extracted from the criminal justice data repository maintained by the Alaska Department of Public Safety. This data was analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and completeness of Alaska’s criminal history repository data on sex offenses and to explore the quality of those data for examining case processing of misdemeanor and felony offenses.
    • Alaska Superior Court Felony Case Processing, 2005–2012

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-05)
      This fact sheet presents a summary of Superior Court felony case filing and disposition information published by the Alaska Court System (ACS) in its annual statistical reports for the period FY 2005 to FY 2012. Over the 8-year period, the total number of felony case filings increased 13.1 percent, but the percentage of all case filings that were felonies remained stable. The percentage of felony cases that were for violent (person) crimes, drug crimes, and other crimes declined during the 8-year period, while the percentage that were for property crimes increased. A large majority of Superior Court felony cases resulted in a disposition of "guilty," with most such dispositions the result of a plea. Only 2.9 percent of felony cases filed in Superior Court go to trial; of these, nearly 80 percent resulted in a finding of guilt.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Alcohol or Illegal Drugs, 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-21)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on numbers of trauma admissions, patient demographics, and the presence of alcohol or illegal drugs in trauma admissions in 2014. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Firearms, 2009-2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on characteristics of trauma admissions for the period 2009–2014 for injuries for which a firearm was the main mechanism of injury. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Alaska Trial Court Case Filing Statistics, 2005–2012

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Fortson, Ryan (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-04)
      This fact sheet describe case filings, caseloads, and types of cases filed in Alaska’s trial courts (Superior Court and District Court) during fiscal years (FY) 2005–2012. Data were extracted from Alaska Court System annual statistical reports. The report examines data on case filings, caseloads, and types of cases filed in Superior and District courts.
    • Arrests for Drug Offenses in Alaska: 2000–2011

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-09)
      This fact sheet presents data for 2000–2011 on arrests for drug offenses made by Alaska police agencies. The report presents drug offense arrest information for both adults and juveniles for the 12-year period, including number of drug offense arrests, drug offense arrests as a percentage of all arrests, drug offense arrest rate, and drug offense types. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Arrests for Drug Offenses in Alaska: 2000-2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-09-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on arrests for drug offenses made by Alaska police agencies for the period 2000 through 2011. The report presents drug offense arrest information for both adults and juveniles for the 12-year period, including number of drug offense arrests, drug offense arrests as a percentage of all arrests, drug offense arrest rate, and drug offense types. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Arrests for Violent Crimes in Alaska, 1980-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-12-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Department of Public Safety’s annual report Crime in Alaska for the years 1980 through 2012 (the last year for which data are available) on violent crime arrests in Alaska. Crime in Alaska represents the State of Alaska’s contribution to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s national Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program. The UCR program collects data from law enforcement agencies across the United States. (In 2012 more than 18,000 agencies participated in the UCR program.) The UCR includes in its count of arrests all arrests, citations, and summonses for 28 different offenses. Presented here are Alaska arrest data for four offenses known as Part I violent offenses: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter (homicide), forcible rape (rape), robbery, and aggravated assault.
    • Assaults Committed against Alaska Police Officers, 2002–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03)
      This fact sheet presents information reported to the Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) by Alaska police agencies on the frequency of assaults committed against police officers for the period 2002–2011. Data were extracted from DPS's annual Uniform Crime Reporting publication Crime in Alaska. Aspects of assaults on police examined include rates of assault, percentage of assaults resulting in injury, weapons used in assaults, and officers killed in the line of duty (1960–2011).
    • Brady Statute Data: Adjudicated Mental Defectives and Involuntary Mental Commitments

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-08)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the first of four reports on these categories, describes how adjudicated mental defectives and involuntary mental commitments can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The report discussed federal statutory definitions of the terms adjudicated as a mental defective, committed to a mental institution, and legal authority; compares these terms with those current in Alaska Statues and used by social service and mental health agencies in the state; and describes, in general, data held by federal, state, local, and private agencies in Alaska. At present, there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either of the two categories with any accuracy: besides technical difficulties in getting different databases to "talk" to each other, records are not kept on mentally ill individuals, and even if they were, access would be prohibited in the face of federal and state laws regarding privacy.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibits the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. These reports describe potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, illegal aliens, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, are the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety—Executive Summary

      Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Atwell, Cassie (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibited the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. This executive report summarizes study findings on potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, noncitizens in the U.S. illegally or unlawfully, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and briefly discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, were the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Illegally or Unlawfully in the United States

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the fourth of four reports on these categories, describes how undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully in the United States can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. It was found that the most feasibile means for obtaining information for the purposes of Brady background checks would be the Verification Information System (VIS) of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). However, project researchers received no response from INS to inquiries about requirements of access to VIS.