• Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals and Charges in Alaska, FY 2006–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-02-02)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals and charges in the Alaska juvenile justice system for state fiscal years 2006–2015, including: the total number of referrals made to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) by law enforcement, the total number of charges by class and offense type, and the number of unique juveniles referred to DJJ. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals in Alaska, 2003-2013

      Parker, Khristy; Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals made by Alaska law enforcement agencies to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for for state fiscal years 2003–2013. The report presents data on the number of juveniles referred to DJJ, number of referrals made, charges by class and offense type, and demographic information on referred juveniles. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Measuring Adult Criminal Victimization: Findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey

      Giblin, Matthew; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-07)
      Since 1973, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has been administered annually to a national sample of households. The survey captures unreported or underreported criminal events that are not available using official crime data such as the Uniform Crime Reports. However, the data collected are most useful in identifying crime trends nationwide. The national scope of the survey makes it impossible to extract crime data for smaller geographic areas, thus limiting its utility for Anchorage residents and policymakers with criminal justice concerns. To compensate for this limitation, the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage administered a local version of the NCVS during second quarter 2002. By surveying adult residents of Anchorage, the project, titled the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey (AACVS), generated a wealth of information on crime victimization, neighborhood conditions, fear, and policing in Anchorage. This report presents the results of the AACVS.
    • Property Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on property crime in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Property crime" is an aggregate category that includes burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft crimes. From 1986 to 2015 the property crime rate in Alaska decreased as the overall crime rate decreased. On average, property crime accounted for two-thirds of all crime in Alaska over the thirty-year period.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Program: Initial Recidivism Study

      Mander, Anthony M.; Atrops, Martin E.; Barnes, Allan R.; Munafo, Roseanne (Offender Programs, Alaska Department of Corrections; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1996-07-31)
      This report presents results of a recidivism study of participants in the Sex Offender Treatment Program at Hiland Mountain Correctional Center, Alaska Department of Corrections, from January 1987 to August 1995. The report provides an overview and history of sex offender treatment in Alaska as well as a literature review of other studies and findings on this area of treatment. The Alaska study, which was the first conducted of the treatment program, found that any level of treatment achieved resulted in less recidivism, with the longer the period of treatment, the lower the recidivism. The study also noted the high percentage of Alaska Natives in the program and the history of alcohol and substance abuse presented by many sex offenders. The majority of offenders in the program were guilty of assaulting children. The study discusses the program's cost benefits as well as the implications of its findings for probation and parole.
    • Sex Offender Treatment Program: Preliminary Description

      Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1995-05-10)
      This report provides a summary of the history of sex offender treatment in Alaska, including the current status of treatment programs offered by the Alaska Department of Corrections, a review of literature on sex offender treatment and recidivism issues, and a summary of the descriptive characteristics of individuals who came in contact with the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center from January 1987 to March 1993.
    • Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Committed against University of Alaska Students

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students. The estimates are based on 1,982 survey responses to the University of Alaska Campus Climate Survey, an online survey that collected data from a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at UA during spring semester 2016.
    • Sexual Violence Committed against University of Alaska Students, by Gender

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-12)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students both on and off campus. Women- and men-specific estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole only. The results presented here are based on the survey responses of a randomly selected sample of 1,982 undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at any of the three UA major administrative units (MAUs) — UA Anchorage (UAA), UA Fairbanks (UAF), or UA Southeast (UAS) during spring semester 2016. This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-02)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1980–2011 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-08)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1982–2012 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska, including size of law enforcement agencies by number of employed personnel, police-citizen ratio, ratio of sworn officers to civilian employees, and employment of women as sworn officers. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Violent Crime Arrests in Alaska

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-01)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1980–2011 on violent crime arrests in Alaska: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.