• Assaults Committed against Alaska Police Officers, 2002–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03)
      This fact sheet presents information reported to the Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) by Alaska police agencies on the frequency of assaults committed against police officers for the period 2002–2011. Data were extracted from DPS's annual Uniform Crime Reporting publication Crime in Alaska. Aspects of assaults on police examined include rates of assault, percentage of assaults resulting in injury, weapons used in assaults, and officers killed in the line of duty (1960–2011).
    • Brady Statute Data: Adjudicated Mental Defectives and Involuntary Mental Commitments

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1997-09-08)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the first of four reports on these categories, describes how adjudicated mental defectives and involuntary mental commitments can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The report discussed federal statutory definitions of the terms adjudicated as a mental defective, committed to a mental institution, and legal authority; compares these terms with those current in Alaska Statues and used by social service and mental health agencies in the state; and describes, in general, data held by federal, state, local, and private agencies in Alaska. At present, there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either of the two categories with any accuracy: besides technical difficulties in getting different databases to "talk" to each other, records are not kept on mentally ill individuals, and even if they were, access would be prohibited in the face of federal and state laws regarding privacy.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibits the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. These reports describe potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, illegal aliens, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, are the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Establishing Noncriminal Classifications for the Alaska Department of Public Safety—Executive Summary

      Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Atwell, Cassie (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09-14)
      The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 prohibited the purchase of firearms by persons in certain noncriminal categories. This executive report summarizes study findings on potential data sources for the identification of mental committments, addicted substance abusers, noncitizens in the U.S. illegally or unlawfully, and persons who have been the subject of a domestic violence restraining order and briefly discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection for the purpose of Brady background checks. Lack of infrastructure for collecting certain types of data, incompleteness of information, and state constitutional protections, including the guarantee of privacy, were the chief obstacles to completely meeting the provisions of the Brady Act in Alaska.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Illegally or Unlawfully in the United States

      Atwell, Cassie; Trostle, Lawrence C.; Barnes, Allan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the fourth of four reports on these categories, describes how undocumented immigrants who are unlawfully in the United States can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. It was found that the most feasibile means for obtaining information for the purposes of Brady background checks would be the Verification Information System (VIS) of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). However, project researchers received no response from INS to inquiries about requirements of access to VIS.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who are Subject to a Court Order Restraining Them from Threatening or Committing Acts of Domestic Violence or Abuse

      Atwell, Cassie; Barnes, Allan R.; Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-03-06)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the second of four reports on these categories, describes how persons subject to a domestic violence restraining order can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. The state is rapidly moving to the point where all individuals who meet the Brady definition for this category will be identified, the information housed in a separate database, and reported to federal agencies. AS 18.65.540 provides for a central registry of Domestic Violence Protective Orders, a product of the (state) Domestic Violence Prevention and Victim Protection Act of 1996.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Unlawful Users of or Addicted to Any Controlled Substances

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the third of four reports on these categories, describes how persons who are unlawful users or addicted to any controlled substance can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. At this time there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either addicts or controlled substance abusers with any accuracy. Records are not kept on addicts or controlled substance abusers, and even if they were, because of the right to privacy, access would be denied. However the Criminal Case Intake and Disposition form is currently used statewide by law enforcement personnel. It could be modified with little effort to capture information on some addiction/controlled substance abuse events for the purpose of Brady background checks.
    • Burglary in Alaska: 1985–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1985–2012 on the property crime of burglary, including burglary rates, time and place of occurrence, and the value of property stolen during burglaries reported to police. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Incidents Closed by the Alaska State Troopers: 2008–2011 — Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Parker, Khristy L. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-07)
      This report presents a descriptive analysis of sexual assault and domestic violence incidents closed by the Alaska State Troopers for the period January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2011, as part of an effort to systematically document the formal processing of sexual assault (SA), sexual abuse of a minor (SAM), and domestic violence incidents reported to law enforcement agencies in Alaska.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Sexual Assaults in Anchorage, Alaska

      Rosay, André B.; Langworthy, Robert H. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-10)
      It has long been known that forcible rapes and sexual assaults occur at a higher rate in Anchorage and in Alaska than in the U.S. as a whole. The Justice Center, in collaboration with the Anchorage Police Department, conducted an epidemiological study aimed at providing a better understanding of the parameters of the rape and sexual assault problem in Anchorage. Researchers looked at case data drawn from the 541 sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department in 2000 and 2001. These data provide the first solid information on victim and suspect characteristics, time and location of assaults, and other details about sexual assaults and rapes reported to the police. In some cases the data contradict some of the more common assumptions regarding Anchorage’s rape problem.
    • DUI/DWI Arrests in Alaska: 2000–2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-08)
      This fact sheet presents data on driving under the influence (DUI) and driving while intoxicated (DWI) arrests made by Alaska police agencies for the period 2000 through 2011. The report describes overall rates of arrest for DUI/DWI during the 12-year period, as well as DUI/DWI arrest rates by major law enforcement agency, by sex, and by race. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Evaluation of the Alaska Pre-Trial Intervention Program

      Schafer, N. E. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988)
      The statewide Pretrial Intervention (PTI) Program of the Alaska Department of Law, begun in 1981, received referrals of accused felons and misdemeanants charged with property crimes or misdemeanor personal crimes. Using data from 1983 to 1986, this study examines extralegal and legal characteristics of PTI clients; analyzies program conditions, compliance, and dispositions; and analyzes achievement of program goals. Criminal histories for 2 to 5 years after intake were used to assess recidivism and recidivist characteristics. Results indicate that PTI operated successfully on a variety of measures throughout its existence. It met intake goals, was available to a broad spectrum of citizens in both urban and rural areas of the state, and two-thirds of clients admitted to the program had no record of subsequent law violations. The program admitted only prosecutable offenders and did not result in netwidening. The program provided alternatives to more severe sanctions for nearly 1,900 Alaskans of all ages, races, and socioeconomic status whose offenses were not violent or of a serious or threatening nature. PTI clients ranged in age from 17 to 66 and included both males and females. Theft, drug burglary/trespass, assault, and minor consuming were the most frequently charged offenses. Of clients, 36.8 percent were felons, and 36.3 percent had prior convictions. During the evaluation period, clients completed 65,302 hours of community service; paid $435,081 in victim restitution; and participated in needed treatment programs, including alcohol, psychological, domestic violence, and career counseling.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1980-2011

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-01-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the prevalence of murder in the U.S. and Alaska from 1980 to 2011, as well as data on the use of firearms in murders (both for the U.S. as a whole, and Alaska), aggravated assaults (Alaska only), and robberies (Alaska only) over the same period.
    • Firearm Use in Violent Crime in the U.S. and Alaska, 1985-2012

      Parker, Khristy; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents national and statewide statistics from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports program on the use of firearms in the commission of three violent crimes — homicide (murder and nonnegligent homicide), robbery, and aggravated assault — in the U.S. and Alaska from 1985 to 2012. Data on the use of knives and other cutting instruments, strong-arm tactics, and other weapons in the commission of these crimes are also presented.
    • Homicide in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data reported on homicides in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Over the 30-year period from 1986 to 2015, homicide rates decreased in Alaska overall, but increased in the Municipality of Anchorage. The Fact Sheet also presents data on the most commonly used weapons in homicides, victim-offender relationships, and clearance rates for homicides.
    • An Implementation of Remote Alcohol Monitoring in Alaska

      McKelvie, Alan R. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-07)
      The Secure Continuous Remote Alcohol Monitoring (SCRAM) system is an ankle bracelet monitoring device implemented for use in 2003–2005 in Anchorage, Palmer, Fairbanks, Bethel, and Kotzebue. The SCRAM devices monitor the wearers' consumption of alcohol through transdermal analysis. By July 2005 there were 130 units in operation in Alaska, with 202 clients participating in the program in 2003 and 2004, and 176 clients in the first half of 2005, when this evaluation took place. Results showed that the devices functioned effectively in Alaska, including in rural areas (using the Alaska satellite telecommunications network), in extreme cold, and under other inclement conditions.
    • Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals and Charges in Alaska, FY 2006–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-02-02)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals and charges in the Alaska juvenile justice system for state fiscal years 2006–2015, including: the total number of referrals made to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) by law enforcement, the total number of charges by class and offense type, and the number of unique juveniles referred to DJJ. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals in Alaska, 2003-2013

      Parker, Khristy; Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-10-01)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals made by Alaska law enforcement agencies to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for for state fiscal years 2003–2013. The report presents data on the number of juveniles referred to DJJ, number of referrals made, charges by class and offense type, and demographic information on referred juveniles. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Measuring Adult Criminal Victimization: Findings from the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey

      Giblin, Matthew; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2003-07)
      Since 1973, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) has been administered annually to a national sample of households. The survey captures unreported or underreported criminal events that are not available using official crime data such as the Uniform Crime Reports. However, the data collected are most useful in identifying crime trends nationwide. The national scope of the survey makes it impossible to extract crime data for smaller geographic areas, thus limiting its utility for Anchorage residents and policymakers with criminal justice concerns. To compensate for this limitation, the Justice Center at the University of Alaska Anchorage administered a local version of the NCVS during second quarter 2002. By surveying adult residents of Anchorage, the project, titled the Anchorage Adult Criminal Victimization Survey (AACVS), generated a wealth of information on crime victimization, neighborhood conditions, fear, and policing in Anchorage. This report presents the results of the AACVS.