Now showing items 1-20 of 45

    • Justice Data Base Directory

      Moras, Antonia; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1992-09)
      The Justice Data Base Directory, first published in 1988 with new chapters added annually through 1992, presents information about the primary databases maintained by Alaska justice agencies and the procedures to be followed for access to the data. Its availability should substantially reduce the work required to identify the sources of data for research and policy development in law, law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The 1992 update to the directory adds five chapters, for a total of 27 Alaska agencies whose justice-related data holdings are described: Alaska Court System; Alaska Judicial Council; Alaska Commission on Judicial Conduct; Alaska Department of Law; Alaska Department of Public Safety (DPS) and three agencies under DPS: Alaska Police Standards Council, Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (CDSA), and Violent Crimes Compensation Board; Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) and Parole Board; four agencies of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services — Bureau of Vital Statistics (Division of Public Health), Epidemiology Section (Division of Public Health), Division of Family and Youth Services, and Office of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Alaska Public Defender Agency; Office of Public Advocacy (OPA); Alaska Bar Association; Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit; Alaska Office of Equal Employment Opportunity (Office of the Governor); Alaska Office of the Ombudsman; Alaska Legal Services Corporation; Alaska Public Offices Commission; Alaska State Commission for Human Rights; Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board; Legislative Research Agency; Legislative Affairs Agency; State Archives and Records Management Services (Alaska Department of Education). Fully indexed.
    • Alaska Sex Offender Recidivism and Case Processing Study: Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      Part I of this report provides updated estimates of Alaska sex offender recidivism, expanding the post-inarceration follow-up period from two years (as used in previous studies) to seven years in order to better understand sex offender desistance from crime. Study data was obtained from the Alaska Department of Corrections and the Alaska Department of Public Safety. The initial analysis sample included all persons who were convicted of one or more registerable sexual offenses and subsequently released from incarceration between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2008. Of the 433 persons who met this critera, 27 died after release from institutional custody, leaving 406 sex offenders in the final analysis sample. In Part II of this report, data on individuals arrested at least once for the commission of one or more registerable sex offenses from 2008 to 2011 — a total of 1,179 individual suspects — were extracted from the criminal justice data repository maintained by the Alaska Department of Public Safety. This data was analyzed to evaluate the accuracy and completeness of Alaska’s criminal history repository data on sex offenses and to explore the quality of those data for examining case processing of misdemeanor and felony offenses.
    • Violent Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-20)
      This fact sheet presents data on violent crimes reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Violent crime" is an aggregate category that includes homicide (murder and non-negligent manslaughter), rape, robbery, and aggravated assault offenses reported to police. From 1986 to 2015, violent crime rates increased in Alaska although the overall crime rate decreased. Homicide and robbery rates declined over the 30-year period, while rape and aggravated assault rates increased from 1986 to 2015 – with aggravated assault acting as the main driver of increases in the violent crime rate over the period. On average, violent crime accounted for 11 percent of all crime reported in Alaska from 1986 to 2015. Aggravated assault accounted for nearly three-quarters, robbery for nearly 15 percent, rape for nearly 13 percent, and homicide for just over one percent of all violent crime reported in Alaska over the period.
    • Property Crime Reported in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-02-06)
      This fact sheet presents data on property crime in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. "Property crime" is an aggregate category that includes burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft crimes. From 1986 to 2015 the property crime rate in Alaska decreased as the overall crime rate decreased. On average, property crime accounted for two-thirds of all crime in Alaska over the thirty-year period.
    • Evaluation of the Alaska Pre-Trial Intervention Program

      Schafer, N. E. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988)
      The statewide Pretrial Intervention (PTI) Program of the Alaska Department of Law, begun in 1981, received referrals of accused felons and misdemeanants charged with property crimes or misdemeanor personal crimes. Using data from 1983 to 1986, this study examines extralegal and legal characteristics of PTI clients; analyzies program conditions, compliance, and dispositions; and analyzes achievement of program goals. Criminal histories for 2 to 5 years after intake were used to assess recidivism and recidivist characteristics. Results indicate that PTI operated successfully on a variety of measures throughout its existence. It met intake goals, was available to a broad spectrum of citizens in both urban and rural areas of the state, and two-thirds of clients admitted to the program had no record of subsequent law violations. The program admitted only prosecutable offenders and did not result in netwidening. The program provided alternatives to more severe sanctions for nearly 1,900 Alaskans of all ages, races, and socioeconomic status whose offenses were not violent or of a serious or threatening nature. PTI clients ranged in age from 17 to 66 and included both males and females. Theft, drug burglary/trespass, assault, and minor consuming were the most frequently charged offenses. Of clients, 36.8 percent were felons, and 36.3 percent had prior convictions. During the evaluation period, clients completed 65,302 hours of community service; paid $435,081 in victim restitution; and participated in needed treatment programs, including alcohol, psychological, domestic violence, and career counseling.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Incidents Closed by the Alaska State Troopers: 2008–2011 — Final Report

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Parker, Khristy L. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-07)
      This report presents a descriptive analysis of sexual assault and domestic violence incidents closed by the Alaska State Troopers for the period January 1, 2008 through December 31, 2011, as part of an effort to systematically document the formal processing of sexual assault (SA), sexual abuse of a minor (SAM), and domestic violence incidents reported to law enforcement agencies in Alaska.
    • Homicide in Alaska, 1986–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data reported on homicides in Alaska from 1986 to 2015 as reported in the Alaska Department of Public Safety publication Crime in Alaska. Over the 30-year period from 1986 to 2015, homicide rates decreased in Alaska overall, but increased in the Municipality of Anchorage. The Fact Sheet also presents data on the most commonly used weapons in homicides, victim-offender relationships, and clearance rates for homicides.
    • Sexual Violence Committed against University of Alaska Students, by Gender

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-10-12)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students both on and off campus. Women- and men-specific estimates are provided for the UA system as a whole only. The results presented here are based on the survey responses of a randomly selected sample of 1,982 undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at any of the three UA major administrative units (MAUs) — UA Anchorage (UAA), UA Fairbanks (UAF), or UA Southeast (UAS) during spring semester 2016. This survey was modeled on the Campus Climate Survey Recommendations prepared by the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault.
    • Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault Committed against University of Alaska Students

      Blumenstein, Lindsey; Myrstol, Brad A. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents past year estimates of sexual misconduct and sexual assault victimization against University of Alaska (UA) students. The estimates are based on 1,982 survey responses to the University of Alaska Campus Climate Survey, an online survey that collected data from a random sample of undergraduate and graduate students who were enrolled at UA during spring semester 2016.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Firearms, 2009-2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on characteristics of trauma admissions for the period 2009–2014 for injuries for which a firearm was the main mechanism of injury. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Alaska Trauma Registry: Trauma Admissions Involving Alcohol or Illegal Drugs, 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-01-21)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) on numbers of trauma admissions, patient demographics, and the presence of alcohol or illegal drugs in trauma admissions in 2014. The Alaska Trauma Registry (ATR) is an active surveillance system that collects data pertaining to hospitalizations of the most seriously injured patients in Alaska.
    • Juvenile Justice Referrals and Charges in Alaska, FY 2006–2015

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-02-02)
      This fact sheet presents summary information on referrals and charges in the Alaska juvenile justice system for state fiscal years 2006–2015, including: the total number of referrals made to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) by law enforcement, the total number of charges by class and offense type, and the number of unique juveniles referred to DJJ. Data is drawn from the DJJ Data Trends website.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Post-conviction Incarcerated Population, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on post-conviction incarcerated populations in both in-state or out-of-state institutions supervised by Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2005–2014. The Fact Sheet focuses on post-conviction incarcerated populations by crime classifications and crime categories overall and within gender. This fact sheet does not include pretrial populations or populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) in non-institutional programs.
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Institutional Populations, 2005–2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-09-08)
      This fact sheet presents data on institutional populations supervised by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) based on their status in the criminal justice system from 2005 to 2014. Probation and parole populations are excluded unless they have violated the terms of their release and been returned to incarceration; individuals on non-criminal holds are also excluded. Data was extracted from the Alaska Corrections Offender Management System (ACOMS).
    • Alaska Department of Corrections: Admissions and Population, 2004–2013

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-01)
      This fact sheet presents data on admissions to, and confined populations in, the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC) from 2004 to 2013, focusing on incarcerated populations and rates, in both in-state and out-of-state facilities, as well as populations and rates in special supervision programs such as Community Residential Centers (CRCs) and electronic monitoring (EM). Data was compiled using the annual DOC Offender Profile publications for 2004 to 2013.
    • Violent Crimes Compensation Board: Claims, FY 2004–FY 2014

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-01)
      This fact sheet presents data from the Alaska Violent Crimes Compensation Board (VCCB) on claims made and compensation granted to victims of violent crime for fiscal years 2004–2014. The report presents data on new claims filed, types of crime and types of expenses for which compensation was claimed, and compensation totals. On average, the five most common violent crimes resulting in applications for compensation over the eleven-year period were sexual abuse of a minor, domestic violence, assault, sexual assault of adults, and homicide.
    • Arrests for Drug Offenses in Alaska: 2000–2011

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-09)
      This fact sheet presents data for 2000–2011 on arrests for drug offenses made by Alaska police agencies. The report presents drug offense arrest information for both adults and juveniles for the 12-year period, including number of drug offense arrests, drug offense arrests as a percentage of all arrests, drug offense arrest rate, and drug offense types. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • State and Local Law Enforcement Personnel in Alaska: 1982–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-08)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1982–2012 on state and local law enforcement personnel in Alaska, including size of law enforcement agencies by number of employed personnel, police-citizen ratio, ratio of sworn officers to civilian employees, and employment of women as sworn officers. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety and the annual Crime in the United States report of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, both of which are part of the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) program.
    • Burglary in Alaska: 1985–2012

      Parker, Khristy (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Center, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This fact sheet presents data for 1985–2012 on the property crime of burglary, including burglary rates, time and place of occurrence, and the value of property stolen during burglaries reported to police. Data is drawn from the annual Crime in Alaska report of the Alaska Department of Public Safety, which represents the State of Alaska's contribution to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program.
    • Brady Statute Data: Persons Who Are Unlawful Users of or Addicted to Any Controlled Substances

      Trostle, Lawrence C. (Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit, Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1998-09)
      Currently, Alaska law enforcement agencies do not obtain data on four noncriminal categories prohibited by the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act of 1993 from obtaining firearms. This, the third of four reports on these categories, describes how persons who are unlawful users or addicted to any controlled substance can be identified within an Alaska context and discusses possible procedures, problems, and solutions associated with data collection. At this time there is no clear or cost-effective way to create and maintain a database for either addicts or controlled substance abusers with any accuracy. Records are not kept on addicts or controlled substance abusers, and even if they were, because of the right to privacy, access would be denied. However the Criminal Case Intake and Disposition form is currently used statewide by law enforcement personnel. It could be modified with little effort to capture information on some addiction/controlled substance abuse events for the purpose of Brady background checks.