• Social Determinants of Pneumococcal and Influenza Immunzation Rates of Nursing Home and Homes for the Aged Residents in Kalamazoo and Calhoun Counties, Michigan: Role of Race and Segragation

      Schauer, Cynthia (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      The disparity in health outcomes between African Americans and Caucasians continues to exist (US ACMH, 2009) despite public policy that promotes equity (US DHHS, 2012). Data suggests African Americans over age 65 living in institutions are less likely to receive flu and pneumonia vaccinations (US DHHS, 2013; US DHHS, 2012) and more likely to live in segregated housing (Smith, Feng, Fennel, Zinn, & Mor, 2007). This project collected data on the local level to determine the degree of impact of low vaccination rates and segregated housing on African Americans in Southwest Michigan. Data regarding flu and pneumonia immunization status was collected from 816 residents in 13 nursing homes (NH) and homes for the aged (HFA) in two southwest Michigan counties. The populations of African Americans in the NH and HFA was much less dense than the population of African Americans in the counties where the nursing homes were found suggesting no potential increase risk on the basis of segregated housing for the erosion of community immunity at this local level. A disparity in immunization rates persisted on the local level: Caucasians were 4.7 times (odds ratio = 4.7; p>0.001) more likely than African Americans to be immunized against flu and 1.7 times (odds ratio =1.7; p = 0.002) more likely to be immunized against pneumonia. While the presence of African Americans in a facility did not influence the immunization status of the health care worker, all facility residents spent the majority of their time with nursing assistants, a group of health care workers that was least likely to have received the annual seasonal flu vaccine. Fifty seven percent of nursing assistants in the study NH and 80% of nursing assistants in HFA had received the vaccine compared to 74% and 100% of registered nurses in NH and HFA, respectively.
    • Standard operating procedure for in-process welding on pipelines and facilities

      Loosli, Seth (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-01)
      In-process welding has become a commonly used approach when installing upgrades or making repairs to piping systems that are live. Pipeline incidents occur every year, and they are often deadly and expensive. The research of this project set out to find out what components a standard operating procedure should have that would lead to reaching a zero percent incident rate while utilizing in-process welding to make money. Not every contractor has the internal processes formalized to perform this work safely in a high-quality manner. Successful execution of this work can lead to opportunities for contractors to expand their scope of operation and expertise further.
    • Standard Operating Procedures for Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT)

      Torres, Michelle (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04)
      The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills. Using the training that they learn in the classroom and during the exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community. People who go through CERT training have a better understanding of the potential threats to their home, workplace and community and can take the right steps to lessen the effects of these hazards on themselves, their homes or workplace.
    • Stephanie Myers PM686A Spring 2014

      Boedigheimer, Stephanie (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04-10)
    • Student Perceptions of the Clinical Education Environment

      Flores, George E. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-07)
      This Masters Project surveyed nursing clinical students at a University School of Nursing in the Pacific Northwest using a recently developed tool, the Student Evaluation of Clinical Education Environment (SECEE, version 3). Use of the SECEE (version 3) helped identify differences in student perceptions of various clinical learning environments. Results of nonparametric statistics were non-significant due to the small sample size; however there appeared to be consistent preference by students for clinicals at Magnet designated facilities. Additionally, higher instructor facilitation scores were also noted among students assigned to the university main campus (n = 31, M = 45.19, SD = 9.39) compared to students assigned to the distance campus (n = 9, M = 36.89, SD = 20.63). The findings have implications for nursing education, specifically the potential benefit of student learning at Magnet designated facilities and the importance of adequate support and engagement between university faculty and students in distance learning environments.
    • Studies Into Synergetic Efficiency of Driven Vertical Axis Propellers

      Penrod, Tanner Blackledge (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-08-01)
      In the quickly expanding field of Industrial Multirotor Drones, one of the main limitations is flight time of current multirotor systems. A method of increasing the flight time is to improve the efficiency of the aircraft design. One possibility for increasing efficiency is synergetic design. Synergetic design is a principal where two or more systems are designed to interact to increase the efficiency of the complete system. In the wind turbine industry, synergetic spacing has been used for increasing the efficiency of vertical axis wind turbines by utilizing staggering. Staggered horizontal axis wind farms have been shown to increase the efficiency by as much as 5% over aligned. These methods even more effective for vertical axis wind turbines due to their specific wake pattern. This project reports the results of synergetic efficiencies of driven propellers in various configurations utilizing a test stand. The design requirements for this stand included minimizing outside interference, the ability to test a wide variety of propellers, and have a built-in measurement system for the required calculations. The measurements that were required included the power consumption, rotational speed, thrust output, and spacing of the motors. The test stand also features a custom electronic system for running the systems. The objectives that were completed by the electrical system included driving the motors, setting the desired speed, and measuring the rotations per minute. Data collection methods and raw data gathered are described, discussed, and compared to theoretical maximum efficiency of the propulsion system.
    • A study of wireless LTE infrastructure growth in the Matanuska-Susitna Bourough

      Chan, Byron S. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-12-01)
      A wireless telecommunications company is targeting to have seamless coverage and minimum download speeds of 10Mbps for users connected to their LTE network over the span of the next 3 years in the Matanuska-Susitna area. The current network performance was explored and it was determined to have non-contiguous coverage with average download speeds of 5.876Mbps, not meeting the requirements. To meet the requirements, techniques for coverage and capacity improvement were explored. Coverage improvement techniques include new base stations, adding lower band spectrum, and using antenna-integrated RRH. Capacity improvement techniques include new base stations, adding additional spectrum, and LTE enhancement features. The wireless telecommunications company is licensed to operate in PCS A/B/E blocks, AWS B block, and 700MHz A block for a total of 51MHz bandwidth. Recommendations based on the requirements and techniques to improve both coverage and capacity are listed below. l. Add five new base stations with existing lOMHz bandwidth of AWS, SMHz bandwidth of 700MHz spectrum, 20MHz bandwidth of PCS spectrum, and antenna-integrated RRH 2. Add 5MHz bandwidth of 700MHz spectrum, 20MHz bandwidth of PCS spectrum, and antennaintegrated RRH to existing base stations 3. Enable LTE-Advanced features including carrier aggregation and 4x4 MIMO to improve data rates This solution will provide seamless coverage and expand data volume capacity from 155.751 TBytes to601.910 TBytes per month allowing data rates to be above 10Mbps until the end of December 2021, after the three year requirement. Implementing the recommendations will allow the wireless telecommunications company to meet and slightly exceed requirements of seamless coverage and minimum download speeds of lOMbps in the Matanuska-Susitna area.
    • Supporting Community Gardening in Alaska Through Development of a Community Garden Practice Guide

      McWilliams, Ryan (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-08-01)
      Anchorage is home to an increasing number of community gardens. The body of literature on the health benefits and potential health risks related to gardening in an urban setting has been steadily expanding as the popularity of urban gardening flourishes in cities across the nation. With Alaska Community Action on Toxics’ (ACAT) interest in community health, the precautionary principle, and healthy gardening practices, a partnership was developed with ACAT for a project and practicum designed to support these values through environmental testing and analysis, key informant interviews, and a practicum experience culminating in the creation of a guide for Alaska gardeners. The final product of the project was a user-friendly guide entitled Understanding Urban Soils: A Guide for Better Understanding the Need and Practice of Testing for Garden Soil Contaminants, in which safe gardening practices and interpretation of soil test results are addressed.
    • Teaching Food Systems in Alaska

      Beam, Jessika (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-08-01)
      The health of Alaska’s food systems relies on the maintenance of food availability, food access, and food utilization overtime to ensure that food security exists. The Teaching Food Systems in Alaska educational modules were created to offer an opportunity to provide expert information and education to Alaska youth on the importance of food systems literacy in Alaska. The educational modules were created to engage youth in the food system. The goal is to inform and educate Alaska youth about food systems in Alaska through the development of a series of educational learning modules organized to address the three primary components of the food system: food availability, food access and food utilization. The modules created could potentially serve as a foundation for the development of future modules, the creation of a formal food systems literacy course or certification program, and/or to seek future funding to support the creation of a future program.
    • A Telemedicine Follow Up Program to Improve Glycemic Outcomes For Patients With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

      Beatty, Jonathan R. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-12-01)
      Type 2 Diabetes is responsible for a global public health burden and affects an estimated 30 million people in the United States, many of whom have difficulty reaching glycemic targets. Approximately 15 percent of the diabetic patients in the Family Health Clinic have an A1C above 8.0. Telemedicine shows promise in improving glycemic control and enhancing access to care. Current literature supports the use of telemedicine to improve glycemic outcomes. The purpose of this project was to assess the acceptability and effectiveness of a provider implemented intense telephonic follow-up program on glycemic outcomes and self-management of patients with uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes. This quality improvement project used a pre-test post-test design using laboratory and survey data collection methods to measure hemoglobin A1C, diabetes self-care, and a post-test provider satisfaction survey. Over a 3-month period, patients meeting criteria for the intervention were provided with telephonic provider follow-up visits at 2-3 week intervals including education on lifestyle changes, medication management and self-care. The mean change in A1C was statistically and clinically significant. The mean change in total self-care survey score was also significant. The data indicated that utilization of telemedicine follow-up improved clinical outcomes for Type 2 Diabetics.
    • Thermal modeling of Anchorage driveway culvert with addition of insulation to prevent frost heaving

      Banzhaf, Clinton J. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      A predominate problem in cold regions, and specifically in Anchorage, Alaska, is frost heaving pavement above culverts in residential driveways. The culvert increases heat loss in the subgrade materials during winter months and allows the soils below the culvert to freeze, which is not an issue if the underlying soils are non-frost susceptible material. However, there are numerous locations in Anchorage and other parts of Alaska where the underlying soils are frost susceptible which result in frost heaving culverts under driveways that cause damaged pavement and culvert inverts that are too high. The seasonal heave and settlement of culverts under driveways accelerates pavement deterioration. A model of this scenario was developed and several insulation configurations were considered to determine a suitable alternative for preventing pavement damage from heaving culverts. The model used material properties for typical Anchorage area silty sand. The model showed that insulation could be used below culverts to prevent differential frost heave at the culvert. In addition, this technique uses typical construction materials and is reasonable for a typical residential dwelling contractor to complete during the construction of the home.
    • Tidal Estuary Morphodynamics of the Knik Arm

      Lewis, Steven E. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      A three-dimensional unsteady flow numerical model was developed to study sediment transport due to tidal circulation within Knik Arm, a dynamic well mixed macro-tidal sub-estuary of Cook Inlet in Alaska. The model was developed to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms that are creating the Point MacKenzie Shoal, located approximately 4 kilometers south of Port MacKenzie. Hydrodynamic conditions within the estuary are very complex in that ebb-and-flood tides, freshwater mixing, and wetting/drying of tidal mud flats significantly effects sediment transport within the estuary. A Mike 3 numerical model was applied to simulate the sediment transport within the estuary under the action of tidal currents in the vicinity of the shoal. The computational domain of this simulation includes four sediment laden freshwater sources; Matanuska, Knik, Susitna, and Twenty-Mile Rivers as well as an open ocean boundary. The spatial resolution of the triangulated flexible mesh model is 0.00045 degrees2 with a coupled fine resolution model of 0.000045 degrees2. The results of the numerical model are in agreement with previously collected field data. Simulation results indicate the shoal formation is the result of turbid tidal flows and deposition is occurring naturally.
    • To be or not to be Smoke Free: An Analysis of the University of Alaska Anchorage Peer Institutions Smoking and Tobacco Policies

      Britt, Joy D. (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-05)
      More colleges and universities are adopting smoke-and tobacco-free policies, yet no literature exists on how types of enforcement protocols aide in policy success. The goal of this study was to assess the comprehensive smoke- and tobacco-free policies of the University of Alaska Anchorage’s peer and neighboring postsecondary institutions to determine what enforcement type may benefit the university in moving towards a comprehensive smoke-free campus policy. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used. In particular, content analysis was used to determine each peer institution’s campus tobacco policy and enforcement strategy, while case study analysis was used to assess the effectiveness of different enforcement types. Results show that approximately 52% of UAA peer institutions have either comprehensive tobacco- and smoke-free campus policies. Of the institutions with comprehensive smoke- or tobacco-free campus policies, 57% have hard/strict enforcement protocols. The case study analyses of two smoke/tobacco-free campuses suggested that hard enforcement with set guidelines and a punitive offense system would promote more policy success over soft enforcement, which only provided verbal reprimand. Study findings suggested that a hard enforcement type was the preferred enforcement method of the sample and that a hard enforcement type supported overall policy success. The study recommends adoption of comprehensive smoke- or tobacco-free campus policies, utilization of a pre-implementation preparatory period before adoption of comprehensive smoke-or tobacco-free policy, and inclusion of hard enforcement protocols to the comprehensive smoke- or tobacco-free policy.
    • United Caribou Association of the Nunamiut

      Tooyak, Andrew Jr (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-08-01)
      Caribou is one food source that the people in Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska rely on as a dependable and traditional source of food. United Caribou Association of the Nunamiut (UCAN) hopes to emulate the Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission in a way that secures a first right of refusal over sport hunters and others. What UCAN proposes by its presence are negotiated restrictions to ensure subsistence taking of caribou by residents of Anaktuvuk Pass. Because the caribou of three Arctic herds are unrestrained and transient, and a shared resource of the State of Alaska, the State Board of Game views the caribou as a shared resource to be used by all citizens of the State of Alaska. The framers of UCAN want to ensure that the State Board of Game, sport hunters, and others know that the people of Anaktuvuk Pass are concerned about their food security. The study discovered that the local community of Anaktuvuk Pass wants outside agencies to know how and why caribou are important to them. Local governing bodies such as the Nagragmiut Tribal Council can and should be taught to develop PowerPoint presentations using their own images, and local storytellers provided avenues to express their concerns. The residents of Anaktuvuk Pass want to be the first to use the caribou as a food resource to protect their food security, and they want to be able to successfully articulate that concern.
    • Using Multimedia Instruction as a Training Enhancement for Aircraft Maintenance Technicians

      Hubbard, Carrollea (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-04)
      This research conducted an evaluation of new and different modalities of aircraft maintenance training for flight line technicians. The primary types of instruction analyzed were instructor based training (IBT), aircraft simulator (SIM) training, on-the-job training (OJT), virtual reality (VR), and video-based training (VBT). The focus was the analysis of training effectiveness for the various instructional platforms. The two aircraft types for training program consideration were the McDonnell Douglas MD-11 (MD-11) and the Boeing B-777 (B-777). Aircraft manufacturers and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) set the training standards for all aircraft mechanics in the airline industry. This study examined the development of effective training for aircraft mechanics. Twenty Anchorage flight line technicians completed two anonymous surveys, and three members from the training department participated in an unstructured interview. The research analyzed the results of the surveys and the interviews to determine what types of multimedia instruction are the most effective for enhancing flight line technician training. The goal was to maximize the educational platform and increase launch reliability numbers efficiently. The best practice to achieve these goals is to have effectively trained technicians.
    • Using Project Management Techniques to Design a PMP Mathematics Study App for the Windows Universal Platform

      Freeman, Jen (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Background As a late comer to the smartphone market, Microsoft has fallen behind the Apple and Google app ecosystems in the quantity and quality of apps offered. To attract developer talent, Microsoft released the Universal Windows Platform which enables apps to run across Windows devices with few additional modifications. Although the Windows app ecosystem has realized an increased number of available apps, few apps related to project management are currently available. About the project This project will design a PMP Certification Mathematics Study App for the Universal Windows Platform which will serve as a reference and study aid for the PMP certification exam. The app will be available to mobile and PC users who are utilizing the Microsoft Windows 10 and Windows 8 operating systems. Features of the app will include project management formula lookup, formula flashcards, and practice problems. At the completion of the project, the app will be submitted to the Windows Store for review and publishing to the Windows 10 application ecosystem. Approach The project scope will include the design of the app from requirements gathering to completion. Project deliverables will be aligned with Windows store applications evaluation criteria for responsiveness, reliability, and style. This project will conclude with submission of a completed application design to the project sponsor.
    • Using Project Management to Align External Stakeholders During Exploratory Well Permitting in State Leases on the North Slope

      Stribling, Owen (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-05-01)
      Natural resource extraction projects can have a polarizing effect on stakeholders. Oil and gas projects that take place on the North Slope of Alaska are no exception. Not taking the time to build long term relationships with important stakeholders, and collaborate with them, throughout the project can amplify this problem and create many more. This project was designed to research if, and if so how, alignment of external stakeholders is planned for. Past project plans were examined to extract lessons learned and best practices. A literature review was conducted to find other improvement ideas. Project management tools and techniques were gleaned and recommendations have been made on ways to align external stakeholders during the exploratory well permitting process.
    • The Utilization of Close Observation in Acute Psychiatric Inpatients

      Farley, Sean (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2020-12-01)
      Close observation is a psychiatric interventional method implemented for individuals who are displaying self-injurious or aggressive behaviors. This is a widely used intervention within the field of mental health Close observation is also regulated by The Joint Commission and the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services for accreditation purposes. A review of the current literature was conducted and revealed that frequently psychiatric patients are placed on inappropriate levels of close observation, that revisions to the close observation policy/practice improve both psychiatric patients and staff safety outcomes, and can overall decrease hospital costs associated with observation intervention. The purpose of this project was to examine the utilization of close observation at an adult psychiatric in-patient facility in Anchorage, Alaska. The Plan Do Study Act model was used as an organizational framework to guide this project. The methodology of the project involved reviewing inpatient psychiatric records, to generate the project’s data for analysis under a process that was monitored by Alaska Psychiatric Institute’s risk management department. Subsequently, the principal investigator organized and statistically analyzed the collected data using the Chi Square method of statistical analysis. The Chi Square statistical method analyzed the differences between the various levels of close observation, self- injurious and aggressive behaviors. The results of the statistical analysis support recommendations to revise the current close observation protocol and practice at Alaska Psychiatric Institute. The evidence generated was used as a forerunner to revise policy that was aimed at improving the utilization of close observation. The project results were disseminated to API via presentation to key stakeholders. The project was catalogued at the University of Alaska Anchorage per protocol.
    • Vaccination Hesitation: Investigation Why Parents Decline Pediatric Influenza Vaccines in Juneau, Alaska

      Leder, Lindsey (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-04-14)
      The influenza virus is responsible for hundreds of childhood deaths and costs the health care system millions of dollars each year (Hassan, Lewis, Davis, Gebremariam, and Dombkowski, 2009). The influenza vaccine is the most effective intervention for prevention of pediatric influenza, yet many parents decline this vaccine for their children. Studies completed in various geographic locations cite different factors influencing parents who decline pediatric vaccinations. Alaska has the second lowest rate of influenza vaccination in the country (Center for Disease Control [CDC], 2012). The purpose of this project was to understand the factors that influence parental decision to refuse influenza vaccination in Juneau, Alaska. A modified version of the Childhood Influenza Immunization Questionnaire, an instrument based on the Health Belief Model, was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of parents at a private pediatric practice in Juneau, AK. Statistical analysis revealed the only significant influencing factor on parents’ decisions on whether to vaccinate against influenza was their perception of vaccine risk (p < .001). Information obtained from this study will be used to educate local providers in the community with the goal of enabling said providers to overcome resistance to vaccination hesitancy based on parent perceptions.
    • Vaccine implementation: Alaska 2017

      Hulstine, Amanda (University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-05-01)
      Bacterial meningitis is a serious disease that causes permanent dysfunction or death; adolescents and young adults carry the greatest risk. The national Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has released vaccine recommendations that include incorporation of meningitis vaccine in to the mandatory school vaccine schedule. Throughout the nation, much of legislative policy has made meningitis vaccination a requirement for public school attendance. Alaska does not have such policy; the purpose of the project was to address this policy need. A secondary project goal was to increase community awareness of bacterial meningitis. Project actions were divided into policy advocacy and community awareness. Policy advocacy included the development of a Policy Brief to Persuade designed for the Alaska legislative health care committee members. A legislative survey to assess willingness to incorporate a required meningitis vaccine schedule into existing Alaska vaccine policy was sent electronically with the policy brief. Community awareness interventions included the development of a Meningitis Education Bundle for healthcare professionals and a Protect Alaska’s Future campaign. The education bundle was distributed to local health establishments on Prince of Wales Island and the campaign information was distributed at the 2017 Prince of Wales Community Health Fair. Project outcomes demonstrated a lack of response to the policy survey. Efforts must continue over time with a deliberate plan to gain legislative support for the incorporation of a meningitis vaccination schedule into existing Alaska vaccine policy, as recommended by the ACIP. Community awareness activities at the health fair were successful and should continue.