UAA Justice Center Research Overview is a series of brief papers on focused justice topics published from 2009 to 2012 by the Justice Center at University of Alaska Anchorage.

Recent Submissions

  • Batterer Intervention Programs (BIPs)

    Parker, Khristy (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02-01)
    An overview of key research findings nationally and in Alaska on batterer intervention programs (BIPs). BIPs are intervention and treatment programs intended to reduce recidivism rates among men arrested for domestic violence offenses.
  • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2007

    Myrstol, Brad A.; Parker, Khristy (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03-01)
    Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2007. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson.
  • Victim-Suspect Relationship in Sexual Assault Cases Reported to Law Enforcement: Alaska and National Data

    Rosay, André B.; Amundson, Steven (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-04-01)
    An overview of key research findings nationally and in Alaska on the relationships between victims and suspects in sexual assault cases.
  • Sex Offender Registries and Notification Programs

    Periman, Deborah (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-05-01)
    Presents a brief history of sex offender registries and notification programs nationally and in Alaska; describes provisions of Alaska's registry/notification laws; and discusses recent research findings about the effectiveness of such laws and their impact on offenders.
  • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2008

    Myrstol, Brad A. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-06-01)
    Presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Anchorage known to police from 2003 to 2008. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Figures for 2008 are compared with those for five other western U.S. cities — Boise, Colorado Springs, Portland, Salt Lake City, and Spokane.
  • Homelessness Among Drug-Using Adult Male Arrestees in Anchorage, 2000-2003

    Myrstol, Brad A. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-07-01)
    Presents information on the prevalence of homelessness among Anchorage adult male arrestees based on data from the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program compiled from 2000 to 2003.
  • Criminal Offending Among Homeless Drug-Using Male Arrestees, Anchorage, 2000–2003

    Myrstol, Brad A. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-08-01)
    Looks at homelessness and criminal offending among adult drug-using male arrestees using data collected in Anchorage from 2000 to 2003 as part of the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) program.
  • Methamphetamine (Meth) Use, Trafficking, and Treatment

    Rivera, Marny; McMullen, Jennifer (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-09-01)
    Presents a summary of the meth problem in the U.S. and Alaska using the most recent available data on use, trafficking, and treatment related to methamphetamines.
  • Referrals to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice: 2003–2008

    Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-10-01)
    This research overview presents statistics on juveniles referred by law enforcement agencies to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) from 2003 to 2008. Juveniles are referred to DJJ if there is probable cause that a youth (1) committed an offense which would be criminal if committed by an adult, (2) committed a felony traffic offense, or (3) committed an alcohol offense after two prior convictions in District Court for minor consuming. Adults may be referred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice if their offenses were committed as juveniles.
  • Problems and Costs Associated With Underage Drinking

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
    This research overview presents the most recent information (2007) on the public problems and costs of underage drinking in the U.S. and in Alaska, and describes Alaska's response. In 2007, Alaska was ranked 39th among U.S. states for total costs of underage drinking, but had the highest costs of underage drinking per youth, nearly twice the national average.
  • Stalking Victimization: Comparisons Between Alaska and U.S. Data

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-01-01)
    This research overview presents information on stalking victimization currently available for Alaska and notes contrasts and similarities with the U.S. national data on stalking, looking in particular at gender, age, race, and relationship between victims and offenders. Limitations on the comparability of Alaska and national data are noted.
  • Violent and Property Offenses in Anchorage, 2003–2009

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-04-01)
    This research overview presents information on serious violent and property crimes reported to Anchorage police for 2003–2009 collected as part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program (UCR).
  • A Brief Look at Gangs and the Fairbanks Gang Assessment

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-07-01)
    This research overview presents selected information from the 2010 Fairbanks Gang Assessment, along with national data about gang member demographics, gang membership motivation, and problems caused by gangs.
  • Violent and Property Offenses in Alaska, 2002–2010

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
    This research overview presents crime rates and number of offenses for violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for seven of the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. (UCR does not report the other Part I offense, arson, by state. For arson arrests, see Research Overview numbers 15 and 16). Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • Adult Violent and Property Crime Arrests in Alaska, 2002-2010

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
    This research overview presents data on adult arrests and arrest rates for serious violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.
  • Juvenile Violent and Property Crime Arrests in Alaska, 2002–2010

    Parker, Khristy (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2012-07-01)
    This research overview presents data on juvenile arrests and arrest rates for serious violent and property crimes in Alaska known to police from 2002 to 2010. Figures presented, from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program, are for the eight serious offenses defined as Part I offenses: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Alaska figures for 2010 are compared with those for five other western U.S. states — Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, and Wyoming.