• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 20, No. 4 (Winter 2004)

      Rosay, André B.; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-01-01)
      The Winter 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on forcible rapes and sexual assaults reported to Anchorage Police Department in 2000–2001, the growth of prison populations in the U.S., a review of an Alaska Judicial Council study of felony case process, options for indigent defense in Alaska, and dispositions of sexual assault cases in Alaska.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 21, No. 3 (Fall 2004)

      Moras, Antonia; Carns, Teresa W.; Kelley, Pamela; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2004-09-01)
      The Fall 2004 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum featured articles on judicial selection in Alaska and other state courts in the U.S.; civil cases in Alaska and other state courts in the U.S.; gender equality in justice professions; and volunteers in Alaska youth courts and other justice agencies.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 22, No. 2 (Summer 2005)

      Rosay, André B.; Riley, John; Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2005-06-01)
      The Summer 2005 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum presents articles on homeless youth in Homer, a review essay of a recent book about mass incarceration, an overview of probation and parole in Alaska, and public perceptions of and experiences with Anchorage Police Department.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 24, No. 1 (Spring 2007)

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Wood, Darryl S.; Kelley, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-03-01)
      The Spring 2007 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles describing stalking incidents reported to Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005, a discussion of Alaska's 1993 stalking statute and a suggested update to it; and current visa programs which address the needs for guest workers in Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 24, No. 3 (Fall 2007)

      Periman, Deborah; Rosay, André B.; Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Evans, Shel L. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2007-09-01)
      The Fall 2007 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on the collateral consequences of criminal conviction in Alaska, results of an Alaska Judicial Council evaluation of the Alaska Court System's three felony-level therapeutic courts, disproportionate minority contact within the juvenile justice system in Fairbanks North Star Borough, and results of a community survey in Matanuska-Susitna Borough.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 1-2 (Spring / Summer 2008)

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B.; Periman, Deborah; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Henry, Tara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-03-01)
      The Spring/Summer 2008 double-issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on various aspects of the problem of sexual assault—the nature of the crime, victims and suspects; case prosecution; offender recidivism; public safety and rehabilitation, with articles on case processing of sexual assault cases in rural villages, a description of the sexual assault problem in communities served by the Alaska State Troopers, Sexual assault nurse examinations in Alaska, and Alaska's sex offender registration statute. An additional article looks at national figures on incarcerated parents.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 25, No. 3 (Fall 2008)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-09-01)
      The Fall 2008 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports on assaults in domestic violence incidents in Alaska communities served primarily by the Alaska State Troopers; the trajectories of juvenile delinquency careers among youth in Anchorage and Fairbanks; and results of a community survey of residents of Northeast Anchorage on public safety and community satisfaction.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 2 (Summer 2009)

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-06-01)
      The Summer 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles describing the relationship between drug use and criminal offending among male arrestees in Anchorage, a look at homelessness in Alaska, and results of a victim service training needs assessment survey.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-01)
      The Fall 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on violence against women, with articles on legal resolutions and attrition in domestic violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers, recent recommendations from Alaska lawmakers and the Governor on reducing violence in Alaska, and the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence. An additional article details recent data about leading causes of death for Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 4 (Winter 2010)

      Periman, Deborah; Rosay, André B.; Begich, Thomas S.; Carns, Teresa W. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-01-01)
      The Winter 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads off with an article on a recent Ninth Circuit decision holding that a Washington state law denying felons the right to vote is a violation of the Voting Rights Act. Other articles include profiles of correctional populations in Alaska and the U.S., an update on the work of the Criminal Justice Working Group, a pilot program aimed at reducing probation revocations rates, a study of juvenile probation officer workloads, and a discussion of the Language Interpreter Center, which works to provide qualified interpreters in legal, medical, social services, and educational settings statewide.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 27, No. 1 (Spring 2010)

      Rosay, André B.; Everett, Ronald S.; Chamard, Sharon; Armstrong, Barbara; Carns, Teresa White (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-03-01)
      The Spring 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on juvenile sex offenders, housing for chronic inebriates, justice projects in Alaska funded through Recovery Act funds, and the Alaska Prisoner Re-entry Task Force.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 28, No. 4 – Vol. 29 No. 1 (Winter 2012 / Spring 2012)

      Chamard, Sharon; Rosay, André B.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2011-12-01)
      The Winter/Spring 2012 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on self-protective behaviors that people engage in to feel safe in their homes, key indicators affecting domestic violence and sexual assault in Alaska, results of an Alaska Judicial Council study of offender recidivism in Alaska, and predicting recidism among Alaska youth offenders.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 30, No. 1 (Spring 2013)

      Rosay, André B.; Rivera, Marny; Williams, Dean; Comeau, Carol; Hitchcock, William D.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2013-03-01)
      The Spring 2013 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum is devoted primarily to issues related to school discipline and the juvenile justice system, and features three articles on "zero tolerance" policies by Dean Williams, who was the Superintendent of the McLaughlin Youth Center; Carol Comeau, who was the Superintendent of the Anchorage School District; and William Hitchcock, who was the Master of the Anchorage Children’s Court. Background is provided through an examination of recent data on juvenile delinquency and school suspensions and expulsions for Alaska. A fifth article describes StepUp, a diversion program for expelled or long-term suspended students which has operated for the past four years in the Anchorage School District. The issue also includes updates on Alaska Victimization Survey data releases, faculty and staff news, and a memorial to retired Justice Center faculty member Dr. Lawrence C. Trostle, who died in May 2013.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 34, No. 1 (Summer 2017)  

      Rosay, André B.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      The Summer 2017 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and on the consequences of Alaska's lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community. An editor's note describes changes to the publication and invites online subscriptions. The Summer 2017 online edition includes expanded versions of print stories, an additional story on a collaborative problem-solving process involving liquor stores in an Anchorage neighborhood and a farewell from André B. Rosay, who served as Justice Center director from 2007 to 2017.
    • Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 1,281 cases with an assault charge involving domestic violence reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004, and excluded any cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Eighty-two percent of reports were handled by three detachment areas: 32% in C — “ Western Alaska, 29% in D — “ Interior Alaska, and 22% in B — “ Southcentral Alaska. Troopers received 80% of the reports, while 20% were received by Village Police Officers, Village Public Safety Officers, or Tribal Police Officers. Eighty-one percent of the assault charges were in the fourth degree. Eighty-four percent of assaults were reported within 24 hours, and 89% of victims and 81% of suspects were interviewed on the day of the report. * Seventy-six percent of suspects were male and 24% were female. On average, suspects were 33 years old and victims were 32 years old. The majority of assaults in domestic violence incidents (86%) were intra-racial. Fifty-seven percent of suspects and 32% of victims used alcohol. Overall, alcohol was involved in 59% of domestic violence incidents reported to Troopers. * Most assaults in domestic violence incidents (75%) occurred between victims and suspects who were staying or living together. The most common forms of violence (disclosed by victims and documented by officers) included pushing, grabbing, or shoving the victim (in 48% of incidents), punching the victim (in 29%), and slapping or hitting the victim (in 28%). Weapons such as knives or guns were rarely used. The most common injuries included bruising (for 38% of victims), lacerations or bite marks (for 27%), bloody nose or lips (for 10%), and black or swollen eyes (for 10%). Forty-three percent of incidents occurred in the presence of children. * Eighty percent of cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 68% were accepted for prosecution, and 54% resulted in a conviction. Overall conviction rates were slightly lower for female suspects, but conviction rates were generally not affected by victim gender or victim-suspect relationship.
    • Case Attrition of Sexual Violence Offenses: Empirical Findings

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This report examined the legal resolutions for 1,184 contact sexual violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded results from other law enforcement agencies. We determined whether cases were founded with an identifiable suspect, were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, were accepted for prosecution, and if the case resulted in a conviction. We only examined whether any conviction on any charge was obtained. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. * Seventy-five percent of cases were founded with at least one identifiable suspect, 51% of founded cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction on at least one charge. The greatest point of attrition was from the founding to the referral decision. * For the most part, cases of Alaska Native victims were as likely, or even more likely, to be processed by the criminal justice system relative to the cases of non-Native victims. * Cases of sexual violence in the most rural portions of Alaska had an equal or greater chance of being subject to legal sanction when compared with cases from Alaska's less rural areas, and were as likely or more likely to receive full enforcement and prosecution. Unfortunately, the percentage of founded cases that resulted in a conviction never exceeded 30%.
    • Director's Farewell

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Dr. André B. Rosay bids farewell to the UAA Justice Center, where he has been director since 2007. Dr. Rosay has been appointed associate dean for academic and student affairs in the College of Health at University of Alaska Anchorage.
    • Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.
    • Sexual Assaults Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rosay, André B.; Postle, Greg; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 989 cases with a sexual assault or sexual abuse of a minor charge reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded any sexual assault cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Forty-eight percent of reports came from C Detachment (Western Alaska - Kodiak to Kotzebue), and 58% were reported from communities off the road system. * In 69% of cases, the identity of at least one suspect was known. While most suspects (87%) were adults, most victims (73%) were juveniles. Sixty-one percent of victims were Alaska Native and 38% were White. Intra-racial victimizations were much more prevalent than inter-racial victimizations. The most common suspect was a friend or acquaintance of the victim, followed by a relative. Forty-three percent of suspects and 27% of victims had used alcohol. * Sexual penetration occurred in 60% of assaults. Weapons were very rarely used. Most assaults occurred inside private residences. Nineteen percent of victims experienced general physical pain and 10% suffered bruising or swelling. Most victimizations were reported quickly to Troopers and Troopers were quick to respond. Ninety-six percent of victims were interviewed, with 48% interviewed on the day of the report and 80% interviewed within one week of the report. * Forty-six per cent of reported cases were referred for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction. Overall, however, only 22% of reported cases resulted in a conviction. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. The highest level of attrition occurred from report to referral.