• Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 10 (November 1978)

      Bruce, Kevin; Lederman, Sema; UAA Criminal Justice Center (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-11)
      The November 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum leads with a description of Project PROSECUTOR (PROSecutor's Enhanced Charging Using Tested Options and Research), a project of the Alaska Department of Law and the UAA Criminal Justice Center to improve prosecutor screening and legal advising to police and to establish a pretrial intervention program. Standing Together Against Rape (STAR), a 24-hour crisis intervention and advocacy service for victims of sexual assault, opened in Anchorage in May 1978. The state of Washington has adopted a sweeping new juvenile justice code, which went into effect July 1, 1978, replacing the original code adopted in 1913. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, the winter 1978–1979 schedule of classes offered by the Justice B.A. program at UAA, announcement of an upcoming police education symposium, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 2, No. 6 (July 1978)

      Stern, Barry; Cobb, Chris; Robinson, Elliott H.; Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-07)
      In the July 1978 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum, the staff counsel of the Alaska Criminal Code Revision Subcommission describes the major provisions of the Revised Alaska Criminal Code as approved by the Alaska Legislature in June 1978, and highlights changes from the draft revised code proposed by the subcommission. The Anchorage Pretrial Intervention Project, which became operational in early 1978, is described. An offender reentry program of the Alaska Division of Corrections to help ex-offenders adjust to life after prison is described. The concluding installment of a six-part series on the law of confessions discusses the use of evidence obtained from defendants which is inadmissible under Miranda guidelines or for other reasons related to violation of defendants' Fifth or Sixth Amendment rights. Additional articles discuss a national survey indicating the need for sex offender treatment programs and a report on more efficient police patrol procedures. Also included are digests of recent Alaska Supreme Court opinions and points brought up in criminal appeals cases, announcements of upcoming courses and seminars, and a justice training calendar.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring 2006)

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-03-01)
      The Spring 2006 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on case processing in sexual assault cases, a review of the report of the Rural Justice and Law Enforcement Commission, and a bibliography of six major commissions which have examined the spectrum of Alaska justice system issues since the early 1990s
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 26, No. 3 (Fall 2009)

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; TePas, Katherine (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2009-09-01)
      The Fall 2009 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on violence against women, with articles on legal resolutions and attrition in domestic violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers, recent recommendations from Alaska lawmakers and the Governor on reducing violence in Alaska, and the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence. An additional article details recent data about leading causes of death for Alaska and the U.S.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 5, No. 3 (Fall 1988)

      Schafer, N. E.; Conn, Stephen; Bureau of Justice Statistics (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1988-09)
      The Fall 1988 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum reports the results of study of the Alaska Pretrial Intervention (PTI) of the Alaska Department of Law, which operated from 1983 to 1986. The PTI program was intended to provide an alternative to full prosecution in cases where the nature of the offense did not appear to warrant such prosecution; the study concludes that the program succeeded according to a number of factors. An article on the policy for Native self-determination in Alaska developed by Congress and the state has sought to replace a tribal model of governance with a body of legislation which confirms land rights without the direct political involvement of Alaska Native villages; however, the author argues, the absence of tribes as formal political structures has contributed to a loss of self-determination among Alaska Natives and to serious negative effects on Native village life. The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports on a national survey of criminal defense programs for the poor. September 1988 population figures for Alaska Department of Corrections facilities are presented.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 9, No. 4 (Winter 1993)

      Dellinger, A. B.; Schafer, N. E.; Bureau of Justice Statistics; Angell, John E.; Miller, Roger C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1993-01-01)
      The Winter 1993 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum examines evidence from the discontinued Alaska Pretrial Intervention Program (PTI), as a basis for discussing new alternatives to incarceration in a time of crowded prisons and a runaway corrections budget. The Bureau of Justice Statistics describes drug enforcement and treatment methods being used in federal and state prisons in the U.S. Community policing as an alternative to traditional urban policing methods is examined.
    • Sexual Assault Case Processing: A Descriptive Model of Attrition and Decision Making

      Snodgrass, G. Matthew (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the outcomes of sexual assault cases reported to the Anchorage Police Department between January 2000 and December 2003. The data include 1,052 cases involving one suspect and one victim (85% of all reported sexual assaults). Cases and charges were tracked through the Alaska Department of Law to determine what was referred, accepted, and convicted. * Overall, 18% of cases were referred for prosecution. The most common referred charge was a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-nine percent of referred charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 12% of cases were accepted for prosecution. The greatest point of attrition was from report to referral. Once referred, 68% of cases were accepted for prosecution. Sixty-eight percent of charges were accepted by the Department of Law as referred. The most common reasons for not accepting a charge as referred were evidentiary reasons. The most common accepted charge was also a sexual assault in the first degree. Seventy-five percent of accepted charges were sexual assault charges. * Overall, 11% of cases resulted in a conviction. Once accepted, 87% of cases resulted in a conviction. Although convictions were common in accepted cases, accepted charges were often dismissed. While 87% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction, 59% of accepted charges were dismissed. Ninety percent of guilty findings were a result of plea bargaining. With plea bargaining, some charges were dismissed but a conviction was still secured. Fifty-six percent of convicted charges were sexual assault charges. The most common convicted charge was for assault, followed by sexual assault in the second degree.