• 2014 Alaska Department of Corrections Institutional Population

      University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      This article looks at highlights from the 2014 Alaska Offender Profile published by the Alaska Department of Corrections (DOC), with a focus on institutional populations housed both in-state and out-of-state for the period 2005–2014. Institutional populations include pretrial detainees, post-conviction inmates, and probation and/or parole violators housed in a correctional facility. A brief sidebar describes Alaska's unified system of corrections.
    • Academy Expands Medical Forensic Care and Response

      Casto, L. Diane; Trujillo, Angelia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Comprehensive Forensic Training Academy, the first of its kind in the nation, trains nurses and health care providers to support victims of interpersonal violence in a trauma-informed manner and to preserve potential evidence and information for future prosecutions.
    • "Activating" Park Spaces in Anchorage’s Town Square Park (Research Note)

      Payne, Troy C.; Reinhard, Daniel (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-11-06)
      This brief research note describes an intervention designed to increase activity in Anchorage's Town Square Park in an effort to reduce public disorder in the park. An abbreviated evaluation of the intervention is included.
    • Adverse Childhood Experiences and Their Association with Alcohol Abuse by Alaska Adults

      Rivera, Marny; Sidmore, Patrick (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      This article examines the prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) — such as abuse and household dysfunction in childhood — and its association with adoption by Alaska adults of the health-risk behaviors of heavy and binge drinking. The behavioral health of Alaskans could be improved by addressing the association between ACEs and health-risk drinking behaviors, and establishing an integrated prevention system.
    • The Alaska Criminal Justice Commission: A Legislative Call for Action

      Geddes, Mary (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      With its enactment of Senate Bill 64 during the 2013–2014 legislative session, the Alaska Legislature created the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission. This article describes the work of the commission, which is charged with evaluating and making recommendations “for improving criminal sentencing practices and criminal justice practices, including rehabilitation and restitution” over a three-year period. An accompanying sidebar describes other provisions of SB 64, the omnibus crime bill.
    • Alaska Felony Sentencing Patterns: Selected Findings

      Carns, Teresa White (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      This article describes selected findings from the Alaska Judicial Council's recently released report Alaska Felony Sentencing Patterns: 2012–2013. The report examines factors associated with felony sentences under new presumptive ranges set by the Alaska Legislature in 2005 and 2006. The study has been used by the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC), established by the legislature in 2014 to make recommendations about criminal justice reform and sentencing.
    • Alaska Pretrial Risk Assessment Tool (Transcript)

      Fox, Geri; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      [This is a transcript of a video presentation, which can be found at https://youtu.be/wYEP3wDnVVQ.] Geri Fox, Director of the Pretrial Enforcement Division of the Alaska Department of Corrections, is interviewed by Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, about the advantages and limitiations of Alaska’s new pretrial risk assessment tool. The tool, incorporated in Alaska’s new bail statute, calculates whether a defendant is at low, moderate, or high risk for failure to appear at trial or to commit another crime if the defendant is released pretrial, and aids in the judge's decision regarding pretrial bail conditions.
    • Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force Update

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      The Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force, a subcommittee of the Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group (CJWG), focuses on promoting the goal that individuals released from incarceration do not return to custody. This article presents an update on progress on Alaska's Five-Year Prisoner Reentry Strategic Plan, 2011–2016, which was released by Task Force in February 2011.
    • Alaska Sex Offense Law: What Has Changed

      Dunham, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      Alaska’s sex offense laws fall into three broad categories: crimes and defenses, sentencing, and post-release supervision and registry. This article discusses each in turn, looking at how these laws have changed following the 31st legislative session.
    • Alaska Victimization Survey: Aleutian/Pribilof Islands

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      This article provides an overview of key results from the 2014–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) for the Aleutian/Pribilof Island region, which was conducted from April to June 2014 and May to August 2015. Among the survey's results was the finding that 45 percent of adult women in the region have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence or both in their lifetime.
    • Alaska's Evidence-Based Investment (editor's note)

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Winter 2018 edition, which focuses on evidence-based practices that have been incorporated into Alaska's criminal justice system.
    • Alaska’s Lack of Psychiatric Beds and Consequences

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Patients experiencing psychiatric emergencies referred to Alaska Psychiatric Institute (API) in Anchorage must frequently must wait four to six days before being admitted. API, with 80 beds, is the state’s sole psychiatric hospital and provider of inpatient services. Two additional Designated Evaluation and Treatment (DET) hospitals — Fairbanks Memorial Hospital (20 beds) and Juneau’s Bartlett Regional Hospital (12 beds) — provide care for acute psychiatric emergencies. According to a recent privatization report there is no infrastructure in Alaska to support longer, more complex intervention as a routine form of inpatient treatment. This has not always been the case. This article traces the history of Alaska mental health policy and discusses the consequences of the lack of capacity to treat mental illness in the community, including growing numbers entering the corrections system.
    • Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This study examined 1,281 cases with an assault charge involving domestic violence reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004, and excluded any cases reported to local or municipal departments. * Eighty-two percent of reports were handled by three detachment areas: 32% in C — “ Western Alaska, 29% in D — “ Interior Alaska, and 22% in B — “ Southcentral Alaska. Troopers received 80% of the reports, while 20% were received by Village Police Officers, Village Public Safety Officers, or Tribal Police Officers. Eighty-one percent of the assault charges were in the fourth degree. Eighty-four percent of assaults were reported within 24 hours, and 89% of victims and 81% of suspects were interviewed on the day of the report. * Seventy-six percent of suspects were male and 24% were female. On average, suspects were 33 years old and victims were 32 years old. The majority of assaults in domestic violence incidents (86%) were intra-racial. Fifty-seven percent of suspects and 32% of victims used alcohol. Overall, alcohol was involved in 59% of domestic violence incidents reported to Troopers. * Most assaults in domestic violence incidents (75%) occurred between victims and suspects who were staying or living together. The most common forms of violence (disclosed by victims and documented by officers) included pushing, grabbing, or shoving the victim (in 48% of incidents), punching the victim (in 29%), and slapping or hitting the victim (in 28%). Weapons such as knives or guns were rarely used. The most common injuries included bruising (for 38% of victims), lacerations or bite marks (for 27%), bloody nose or lips (for 10%), and black or swollen eyes (for 10%). Forty-three percent of incidents occurred in the presence of children. * Eighty percent of cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 68% were accepted for prosecution, and 54% resulted in a conviction. Overall conviction rates were slightly lower for female suspects, but conviction rates were generally not affected by victim gender or victim-suspect relationship.
    • Benefit vs. Cost of Alaska Criminal Justice Programs

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      The Alaska Results First report released by Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) in October 2017 shows the benefit to cost ratio (monetary return on the state’s investment) for Alaska's adult criminal justice programs, provides tools for assessing how changing the cost structure and delivery method can impact benefit to cost ratios, and provides a new eight-year study of Alaska recidivism rates. This article briefly summarizes the report and provides an introduction to an accompanying article about the report's findings on recidivism in Alaska.
    • A Brief Look at VPSOs and Violence against Women Cases

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2011-11)
      This study examined sexual assault and sexual abuse of a minor cases that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and assault cases involving domestic violence that were reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2004. All analyses were restricted to cases that included only one victim and only one adult suspect. From Alaska Department of Law records, we examined whether cases were referred for prosecution, whether cases were accepted for prosecution, and whether cases resulted in a conviction. We also examined if these legal resolutions were different when the first responder was a local paraprofessional police officer (i.e., a Village Public Safety Officer, a Village Police Officer, or a Tribal Police Officer). • Overall, local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability of referral for sexual assault cases, had no effect on the probability of referral for sexual abuse of a minor cases, and decreased the probability of referral for assault cases involving domestic violence. (Cases are referred for prosecution by the Alaska State Troopers to the Alaska Department of Law.) • For all three offenses (sexual assault, sexual abuse of a minor, and assault involving domestic violence), local paraprofessional police significantly increased the probability that cases would be accepted for prosecution. • Local paraprofessional police did not impact the probability of conviction in sexual assault cases, but significantly increased the probability of conviction in sexual abuse of minor cases and in assault cases involving domestic violence. Cases that resulted in a conviction may have been plea bargained to reduced charges.
    • Case Attrition of Sexual Violence Offenses: Empirical Findings

      Wood, Darryl S.; Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-02)
      This report examined the legal resolutions for 1,184 contact sexual violence cases reported to Alaska State Troopers in 2003 and 2004, and excluded results from other law enforcement agencies. We determined whether cases were founded with an identifiable suspect, were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, were accepted for prosecution, and if the case resulted in a conviction. We only examined whether any conviction on any charge was obtained. In some cases, the conviction may be for a non-sexual offense. * Seventy-five percent of cases were founded with at least one identifiable suspect, 51% of founded cases were referred to the Alaska Department of Law for prosecution, 60% of referred cases were accepted for prosecution, and 80% of accepted cases resulted in a conviction on at least one charge. The greatest point of attrition was from the founding to the referral decision. * For the most part, cases of Alaska Native victims were as likely, or even more likely, to be processed by the criminal justice system relative to the cases of non-Native victims. * Cases of sexual violence in the most rural portions of Alaska had an equal or greater chance of being subject to legal sanction when compared with cases from Alaska's less rural areas, and were as likely or more likely to receive full enforcement and prosecution. Unfortunately, the percentage of founded cases that resulted in a conviction never exceeded 30%.
    • Collateral Consequences and Reentry in Alaska: An Update

      Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      This article describes recent efforts at the national level to ameliorate the public costs of unnecessary collateral consequences, summarizes the array of statutory and regulatory impediments faced by released offenders in Alaska, and highlights legislative efforts in Alaska to improve community safety and public health by facilitating prisoner reintegration and reducing rates of recidivism.
    • Commentary: Collaborative Problem Solving with Liquor Stores

      Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article recounts the history of a successful community-based collaborative problem-solving process in the Fairview neighborhood in Anchorage to resolve a seemingly intractable public disorder problem associated with two area liquor stores. The story is an example of the "co-production of public safety" — residents actively working together with police and others to solve neighborhood problems, rather than waiting passively for police or other government officials to find solutions. The author is a member of the leadership of the Fairview Community Council and an academic and researcher with expertise in using community partnerships to address public safety concerns.
    • Community Justice Initiatives in the Galena District Court

      May, Jeff D. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-17)
      This article examines a community outreach program in rural Alaska whereby an Alaska Court System judge uses restorative justice principles in village sentencing hearings.
    • A Comparison of the American and Russian Constitutions

      Mannheimer, David (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-01-01)
      The constitutions of the United States and the Russian Federation were written half a world and more than two hundred years apart. Despite this fact, the two constitutions appear to be remarkably similiar on many levels. Yet their surface similarities mask true differences—differences in the explicit provisions of the two constitutions and also differences in how seemingly equivalent provisions have been put into practice. These differences are mainly attributable to two factors: the extremely different political problems facing the two nations when they drafted their constitutions and the different political traditions that shaped the drafters' choices and emphasis. This article gives a history of the development of the two constitutions, explores the two nation's provisions for federal supremacy, the presidency, and the rights of citizens, and compares the American constitution's emphasis on procedure with the Russian constitution's relative open-endedness about the powers of government and selection of officials.