• Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • High Referral Rate for VPSO-Assisted Sex Assault Cases

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      This article reports findings from a recent study examining the impact of Alaska’s Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program on the criminal justice response to sexual abuse of a minor (SAM) and sexual assault (SA) cases closed by the Alaska State Troopers (AST) between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011 in western Alaska. The study found that the likelihood that a sexual assault or sexual assault of a minor case will be accepted for prosecution in western Alaska is enhanced when VPSOs are first responders. [This article also appeared on p. 1–4 of the Spring 2018 print edition.]
    • The Homeless: Who and How Many?

      Armstrong, Barbara; Chamard, Sharon (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      Across the nation in both rural and urban areas, public and private agencies work to provide services for homeless people. One of the biggest challenges is collecting data about homeless individuals: how many people are homeless, who they are, what services they need most, and how long they have been homeless. This article looks at reports from 2012, 2013, and 2014 on estimates of homelessness in the U.S. and Alaska, the subpopulations of homeless individuals, and the various definitions of homelessness.
    • How Do You Determine the Right Size of a Police Department? Don’t Look to Crime Rates.

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Studies have shown that changing the number of police officers has no effect on crime rates. This article explains why and describes alternative measures. An accompanying chart compares rates of violent crime in Alaska for 1986–2015 with the number of police officers per 1,000 residents for the same period.
    • In Memoriam [Nancy E. Schafer]

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      Dr. Nancy E. Schafer, a member of the Justice Center faculty from 1983 to 2002, died in September 2013 after an illness. Research publications and papers by Dr. Schafer can be viewed at the Justice Center website.
    • Index to Volumes 1–10

      UAA Justice Center; Green, Melissa S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1994-04-11)
      The Alaska Justice Forum began publication in May 1977 under funding from the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice. It was published by the Criminal Justice Center (now the Justice Center) of the University of Alaska Anchorage and was edited by Roger V. Endell, Peter S. Ring, and Paul L. Edscorn. Due to lack of funding it discontinued with the June 1979 issue (Volume 3, Number 6). The Justice Center and the Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit resumed publication of the Alaska Justice Forum under a different format in Spring 1987 (Volume 4, Number 1) with partial funding from the Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. The Alaska Justice Forum is edited by Antonia Moras. This index includes all articles published in the Alaska Justice Forum from Volume 1, Number 1 (May 1977) through Volume 10, Number 4 (Winter 1994). It was compiled by Melissa S. Green.
    • Informed Alaskans Initiative: Public Health Data in Alaska

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This article describes the national and state public health data made available online through the Alaska Division of Public Health's Informed Alaskans Initiative.
    • Is the Rate of Property Crime Increasing in Alaska? [transcript]

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Is the rate of property crime increasing in Alaska? Data from six Alaska jurisdictions show it’s a complex question. Dr. Brad Myrstol, interim Justice Center director developed a series of graphs to show how the rate of property crime in Alaska is impacted by factors including time, place of crime and type of crime. This presentation focuses on the property crimes of larceny-theft, shoplifting (which is a subcategory of larceny), burglary, and motor vehicle theft. The time period is from 1985 to 2016. The jurisdictions reviewed are: Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, Kenai, North Slope Borough and Palmer. Each use the Uniform Crime Reports to report data. This is a transcript of the video presentation "Property Crime Rates 1985–2016: Is the Rate of Property Crime Increasing in Alaska? Trend Data from Six Alaska Police Agencies" which can be found at https://youtu.be/HiQqNyDgmas. Graphs by Brad A. Myrstol; produced & narrated by Pamela Cravez.
    • Justice Reinvestment Report

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This article summarizes the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission's recommendations for criminal justice reform in Alaska included in the Commission's Justice Reinvestment Report released in December 2015.
    • Key Acts and Cases for Alaska Tribal Court Jurisdiction

      Fortson, Ryan (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-17)
      This article provides an annotated survey of Alaska and federal case law and statutes tracing the development of tribal court jurisdiction in Alaska.
    • Legal Representation and Custody Determinations

      Fortson, Ryan; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      Do lawyers matter in case outcomes, and can this be shown empirically? A recently published study of initial custody disputes suggests that having an attorney can result in a more favorable outcome for the client, but only if the other side is not also represented by an attorney.
    • Long-Term Impacts of Environmental Contaminants Are ‘Generational Game Changer’

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Most Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. After the 1972 closure of a U.S. Air Force base that had operated for 20 years on St. Lawrence Island, residents of the Yup'ik village of Savoonga began to experience a higher incidence of cancer, lower birth-weight babies, and higher numbers of miscarriages. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers eventually spent $125 million cleaning up the abandoned base. But there are concerns about continued impact from environmental contamination. While state and federal health studies recommend continued reliance upon traditional foods based on locally harvested berries, fish, and wildlife, St. Lawrence Island community members fear those foods may be contributing to elevated levels of PCBs and higher cancer rates.
    • Myrstol Is New Justice Center Director

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Dr. Brad Myrstol is announced as the new director of the UAA Justice Center, and Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Spring 2018 edition.
    • Officer-Involved Shootings in Anchorage 1993-2013

      Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      This article presents findings from the December 2013 report Officer-Involved Shootings in Anchorage 1993–2013, which describes shootings involving officers of the Anchorage Police Department (APD) for the period January 1, 1993 through May 11, 2013.
    • Older Women Face Psychological and Physical Abuse

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      This article examines psychological and physical abuse against women in Alaska who are aged 60 or older and compares these rates to national rates. Psychological abuse includes expressive aggression by intimate partners and coercive control by intimate partners. Physical abuse includes physical violence by intimate partners. It also includes sexual violence, by both intimate partners and non-intimate partners. Estimates are provided for both psychological and physical abuse. Alaska estimates come from the 2010–2015 Alaska Victimization Survey (AVS) and national estimates from the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). Results show that one in nine Alaskan women aged 60 or older (11.5%) experienced psychological or physical abuse in the past year. These rates are all significantly higher than national rates.
    • Pretrial Risk Assessment Tool Developed for Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      Beginning January 1, 2018, judicial officers, defense attorneys, and prosecuting attorneys in all Alaska courts began to receive information from a new pretrial risk assessment tool that calculates whether a defendant is at low, moderate, or high risk for failure to appear at trial or to commit another crime if the defendant is released pretrial. The tool, incorporated in Alaska’s new bail statute, aids in the judicial officer’s decision regarding pretrial bail conditions. This article looks at risk assessment tools in general and describes the development of Alaska’s pretrial risk assessment tool.
    • Prison Visitation Policies in the U.S. And Alaska

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      This article examines prison visitation in Alaska and nationally based on a 2012 survey of prison visitation policies for all 50 states and in the federal prison system.
    • Recover Alaska: Healing Alaska's Alcohol Problems

      Rivera, Marny; Hall, Tiffany (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      This article provides an overview of the strategies being implemented by the Recover Alaska initiative in its mission to reduce excessive alcohol use and related harm in Alaska by influencing social norms and perceptions about alcohol use and abuse. Includes a list of online resources.
    • Restorative Justice: Theory, Processes, and Application in Rural Alaska

      May, Jeff D. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-17)
      An exploration of the principles behind using restorative justice as an alternate form of sentencing in criminal cases, with a focus particularly on how restorative justice might be of benefit in rural Alaska. Includes a bibliography. A sidebar, "Restorative Justice Programs and Sentencing", looks at amendments to Alaska Rules of Criminal Procedure 11(i) and Delinquency Rules 21(d)(3) and 23(f) which describe the requirements for referral to a restorative justice program as part of the sentencing process.
    • Revisiting Alaska's Sex Offender Registration and Public Notification Statute

      Periman, Deborah (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This article examines the background and judicial interpretation of Alaska's sex offender registration and public notification statute, the new federal requirements for state sex offender registries and public notice under the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act, and weaknesses in both Alaska's existing system and the enhanced requirements of the new federal legislation. These weaknesses include: * Absence of incentives for offenders to seek therapy or treatment; * Failure to provide for individualized risk assessment that would differentiate between those offenders who pose a negligible or very low risk of re-offending from those who pose a continuing public risk — a failure that causes unwarranted marginalization of low risk offenders and diminishes the overall effectiveness of the public notification system; * Public notice provisions so broad as to substantially impede offenders' reintegration into their families, their community, and the workforce, and potentially chilling family reporting; * Internet posting requirements associated with severe stigmatization and public harassment, and concomitant emotional destabilization and isolation of offenders — factors that may actually increase the risk of recidivism and community harm. * Because the Walsh Act conditions state receipt of Byrne Grant funds on compliance with its enhanced registration and notice requirements, there is little Alaska can do to remedy the above weaknesses and still remain eligible for Byrne funds. However, the article concludes with a recommendation for limited changes to our statute that would minimize, to the extent possible, its adverse effect on offenders' ability to find employment; omit the lowest risk offenders from internet posting requirements; and provide those incentives for treatment permissible under the Walsh Act.