• Contacts Between Anchorage Adults and Police

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      This article presents selected results from a pilot study of police–citizen contacts conducted in Anchorage, Alaska in May 2013. The pilot study was part of a larger effort to establish a statewide police–public contact survey that will allow for comparison between Alaska-specific and national police–public contact estimates.
    • Crime Rates and Alaska Criminal Justice Reform

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Definitive conclusions about the impact of Senate Bill 91 on the rate of property crimes in Alaska are not possible for a number of reasons, including that the most current data cover less than six months following implementation of the first phase of the law. Accompanying figures show rates of incidents of shoplifting, motor vehicle theft, burglary, and larceny theft reported to police in 1985–2016.
    • Criminal Justice Reform and Recidivism Reduction

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-04-01)
      This article briefly examines evidence-based approach to policymaking in criminal justice and the two conceptual pillars that serve as the foundation of this strategy: effectiveness and efficiency. The article also describes the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, a “smart justice” approach to reducing recidivism under the auspices of The Pew Charitable Trusts and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, that is being led in Alaska by the Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC), housed in the UAA Justice Center.
    • Crisis Intervention Teams Assist Law Enforcement

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) is a police-based, first responders’ pre-arrest jail diversion model for individuals with mental illness and/or substance abuse disorder. A new CIT coalition is being developed in Matanuska-Susitna Borough. The online version of the article also includes additional information about specialized police responses.
    • Current Issues Regarding Alaska Tribal Court Jurisdiction

      ; Fortson, Ryan (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-12-17)
      This article examines some of the unresolved issues that will shape tribal court jurisdiction in Alaska in coming years.
    • Director's Farewell

      Rosay, André B. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Dr. André B. Rosay bids farewell to the UAA Justice Center, where he has been director since 2007. Dr. Rosay has been appointed associate dean for academic and student affairs in the College of Health at University of Alaska Anchorage.
    • Disposition of Sexual Assault Cases

      UAA Justice Center (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This article summarizes findings on cases involving sexual offenses from the Alaska Judicial Council study Alaska Felony Process: 1999 (February 2004). (The full Judicial Council report is available online at http://www.ajc.state.ak.us/reports/Fel99FullReport.pdf.) The study examined the original single most serious charge and determined its final disposition. Twelve percent of felony cases included a sexual offense as the original single most serious charge. Charges for sexual abuse of a minor were more likely to be convicted as sexual offenses than sexual assault charges (and were less likely to be convicted as misdemeanors). * The most frequent original single most serious charges included sexual abuse of a minor in the second degree (Class B felony), sexual assault in the second degree (Class B felony), sexual assault in the first degree (Unclassified felony), and sexual abuse of a minor in the first degree (Unclassified felony). * Eighty-one percent of charges for sexual abuse of a minor in the second degree were convicted as sexual offense charges. Forty-one percent were convicted as sexual abuse of a minor in the second degree. Thirteen percent were convicted as misdemeanors. * Fifty-five percent of charges for sexual assault in the second degree were convicted as sexual offense charges. Seventeen percent were convicted as sexual assault in the second degree. Thirty-four percent were convicted as misdemeanors. * Fifty percent of charges for sexual assault in the first degree were convicted as sexual offense charges. Nine percent were convicted as sexual assault in the first degree. Twenty-two percent were convicted as misdemeanors. * Eighty-four percent of charges for sexual abuse of a minor in the first degree were convicted as sexual offense charges. Twenty-one percent were convicted as sexual abuse of a minor in the first degree. Five percent were convicted as misdemeanors.
    • Early Resolution for Family Law Cases in Alaska's Courts

      Marz, Stacey (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-09-22)
      The Early Resolution Program (ERP), the first program of its kind in the nation, was developed by the Alaska Court System's Family Law Self-Help Center to provide self-represented litigants in family law cases with free legal assistance and mediation to help resolve issues and reach settlements without protracted court trials. This article discusses the ERP's goals and development, describes how cases are screened and processed, and presents ERP statistics though August 2014.
    • Editor's Goodbye

      Armstrong, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2016-12-23)
      Barbara Armstrong, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum since 2008, is leaving the Justice Center at the end of December 2016.
    • Editor's Note

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-07-14)
      Pamela Cravez, new editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, announces changes to the publication, including an updated design and enhanced online presence.
    • Editor's Note

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2017-10-18)
      Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the current edition of the Alaska Justice Forum.
    • Editor's Note

      Randolph, Henry (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      An update on the Alaska Justice Forum during times of change at the University of Alaska Anchorage, including the publication's transition to an all-digital format.
    • Employment Barriers and Domestic Violence

      Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      Research has found the link between perpetrator unemployment and domestic violence to be so significant that experts conclude any effective domestic violence prevention strategy must address unemployment and male poverty.
    • Environmental Justice in Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Summer 2018 edition, which addresses environmental contaminants in Alaska, some of the programs in place to deal with them, and the lasting impact that they are having on Alaska Native communities.
    • Environmental Justice: Challenges of Contaminated Site Cleanup in Rural AK

      Williams, Paula; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Efforts to clean up contaminated sites from military installations and other sources have been ongoing in Alaska since the 1980s, and new sites continue to be identified. Most Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. Cleanup projects that are begun may take many years to complete due to the complicated nature of each site. Since 1990, over 5,300 sites have been cleanup up; more than 2,200 sites remain open, including military installations (both abandoned and active), bulk fuel storage and gas stations, airports and airfields, maintenance facilities, and oil exploration, transport, and refining facilities.
    • Expanded Brownfields Program Supports Redevelopment in Alaska

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      The Environmental Protection Agency’s Brownfields Program support the redevelopment of property which may have contaminants from prior use. Anchorage, Mat-Su Borough, and Kodiak Island Borough are current recipients of Brownfields funds. This year Congress increased grant limits under the Brownfields Program and expanded eligibility requirements. Alaska Native villages and corporations that received a contaminated facility from the U.S. government under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) are now eligible for Brownfields grants.
    • Expanded View of Recidivism in Alaska

      Valle, Araceli (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-01-16)
      This article describes findings on recidivism over an eight-year period for individuals released from Alaska Department of Corrections facilities in 2007. These findings emerged from the Alaska Results First (RF) analysis released by Alaska Justice Information Center (AJiC) in October 2017. In general, the RF findings corroborate previous analyses which examined recidivism patterns one to three years after release, but by following offenders for eight years, AJiC is expanding our understanding of recidivism patterns in Alaska for a large group of offenders, beyond any prior study.
    • Expungement and Limiting Public Access to Alaska Criminal Case Records in the Digital Age

      Armstrong, Barbara; Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-06-15)
      A criminal record results in a number of different barriers to reentry into the community for former offenders. These barriers — also called collateral consequences — can be mitigated by reducing the extent to which criminal records are visible to employers, landlords, and others. This article provides an overview of the complexity involved in limiting public access to criminal records, processes adopted in other states, and recent legislative proposals and current options in Alaska.
    • Forcible Rapes and Sexual Assaults in Anchorage

      Rosay, André B. (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2009-03)
      This study examined the characteristics of all sexual assaults reported to the Anchorage Police Department from 2000 through 2003. Key descriptive findings are summarized. * Victims tended to be young and female, with Native women victims in over 45% of reported sexual assaults. * In a majority of the assaults — over 62% — the assailant was not a stranger to the victim. The most common non-stranger relationships included friends and acquaintances. * A majority of the assaults occurred indoors, with 45% taking place at the residence of one or both of those involved. * Sixty-five percent of victims had used alcohol prior to the assault and 74% of suspects had also.
    • High Referral Rate for VPSO-Assisted Sex Assault Cases

      Myrstol, Brad A. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      This article reports findings from a recent study examining the impact of Alaska’s Village Public Safety Officer (VPSO) program on the criminal justice response to sexual abuse of a minor (SAM) and sexual assault (SA) cases closed by the Alaska State Troopers (AST) between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011 in western Alaska. The study found that the likelihood that a sexual assault or sexual assault of a minor case will be accepted for prosecution in western Alaska is enhanced when VPSOs are first responders. [This article also appeared on p. 1–4 of the Spring 2018 print edition.]