Now showing items 41-60 of 219

    • A Comparison of the American and Russian Constitutions

      Mannheimer, David (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008-01-01)
      The constitutions of the United States and the Russian Federation were written half a world and more than two hundred years apart. Despite this fact, the two constitutions appear to be remarkably similiar on many levels. Yet their surface similarities mask true differences—differences in the explicit provisions of the two constitutions and also differences in how seemingly equivalent provisions have been put into practice. These differences are mainly attributable to two factors: the extremely different political problems facing the two nations when they drafted their constitutions and the different political traditions that shaped the drafters' choices and emphasis. This article gives a history of the development of the two constitutions, explores the two nation's provisions for federal supremacy, the presidency, and the rights of citizens, and compares the American constitution's emphasis on procedure with the Russian constitution's relative open-endedness about the powers of government and selection of officials.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 27, No. 3 (Fall 2010) 

      Myrstol, Brad A.; Rivera, Marny; Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2010-12)
      The Fall 2010 issue of the Alaska Justice Forum features articles on school resource officers (SROs); methamphetamine prevention efforts; and a recent 9th Circuit ruling on felon disenfranchisement.
    • Legal Representation and Custody Determinations

      Fortson, Ryan; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      Do lawyers matter in case outcomes, and can this be shown empirically? A recently published study of initial custody disputes suggests that having an attorney can result in a more favorable outcome for the client, but only if the other side is not also represented by an attorney.
    • Academy Expands Medical Forensic Care and Response

      Casto, L. Diane; Trujillo, Angelia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Comprehensive Forensic Training Academy, the first of its kind in the nation, trains nurses and health care providers to support victims of interpersonal violence in a trauma-informed manner and to preserve potential evidence and information for future prosecutions.
    • Alaska Sex Offense Law: What Has Changed

      Dunham, Barbara (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      Alaska’s sex offense laws fall into three broad categories: crimes and defenses, sentencing, and post-release supervision and registry. This article discusses each in turn, looking at how these laws have changed following the 31st legislative session.
    • Editor's Note

      Randolph, Henry (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      An update on the Alaska Justice Forum during times of change at the University of Alaska Anchorage, including the publication's transition to an all-digital format.
    • Study Examines Sexual Assault Survivor Experiences

      Johnson, Ingrid D.; Breager, Randi; TePas, Katherine H. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Department of Public Safety is working with the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center to better understand how sexual assaults reported to the Alaska State Troopers are handled and perceived, and which factors shape the likelihood of achieving justice for sexual assault victim-survivors. A final report including recommendations for practice improvement is expected mid-2020.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 36, No. 1 (Fall 2019) 

      Johnson, Ingrid D.; Breager, Randi; TePas, Katherine H.; Randolph, Henry; Dunham, Barbara; Casto, L. Diane; Trujillo, Angelia; Fortson, Ryan; Payne, Troy C. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2019-09-12)
      The Alaska Justice Forum has resumed publication with our Fall 2019 issue. In this issue we explore a study of Alaska sexual assault survivor experiences; recent changes to Alaska sex offense law; an innovative academy that trains health care providers to support victims of interpersonal violence; and how legal representation affects custody determinations in divorce cases.
    • Employment Barriers and Domestic Violence

      Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      Research has found the link between perpetrator unemployment and domestic violence to be so significant that experts conclude any effective domestic violence prevention strategy must address unemployment and male poverty.
    • In Memoriam [Nancy E. Schafer]

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      Dr. Nancy E. Schafer, a member of the Justice Center faculty from 1983 to 2002, died in September 2013 after an illness. Research publications and papers by Dr. Schafer can be viewed at the Justice Center website.
    • Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force Update

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      The Alaska Prisoner Reentry Task Force, a subcommittee of the Alaska Criminal Justice Working Group (CJWG), focuses on promoting the goal that individuals released from incarceration do not return to custody. This article presents an update on progress on Alaska's Five-Year Prisoner Reentry Strategic Plan, 2011–2016, which was released by Task Force in February 2011.
    • Prison Visitation Policies in the U.S. And Alaska

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      This article examines prison visitation in Alaska and nationally based on a 2012 survey of prison visitation policies for all 50 states and in the federal prison system.
    • Collateral Consequences and Reentry in Alaska: An Update

      Periman, Deborah (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2014-02-19)
      This article describes recent efforts at the national level to ameliorate the public costs of unnecessary collateral consequences, summarizes the array of statutory and regulatory impediments faced by released offenders in Alaska, and highlights legislative efforts in Alaska to improve community safety and public health by facilitating prisoner reintegration and reducing rates of recidivism.
    • Expanded Brownfields Program Supports Redevelopment in Alaska

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      The Environmental Protection Agency’s Brownfields Program support the redevelopment of property which may have contaminants from prior use. Anchorage, Mat-Su Borough, and Kodiak Island Borough are current recipients of Brownfields funds. This year Congress increased grant limits under the Brownfields Program and expanded eligibility requirements. Alaska Native villages and corporations that received a contaminated facility from the U.S. government under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) are now eligible for Brownfields grants.
    • Long-Term Impacts of Environmental Contaminants Are ‘Generational Game Changer’

      UAA Justice Center (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Most Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. After the 1972 closure of a U.S. Air Force base that had operated for 20 years on St. Lawrence Island, residents of the Yup'ik village of Savoonga began to experience a higher incidence of cancer, lower birth-weight babies, and higher numbers of miscarriages. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers eventually spent $125 million cleaning up the abandoned base. But there are concerns about continued impact from environmental contamination. While state and federal health studies recommend continued reliance upon traditional foods based on locally harvested berries, fish, and wildlife, St. Lawrence Island community members fear those foods may be contributing to elevated levels of PCBs and higher cancer rates.
    • Environmental Justice in Alaska

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Pamela Cravez, editor of the Alaska Justice Forum, gives an overview of articles in the Summer 2018 edition, which addresses environmental contaminants in Alaska, some of the programs in place to deal with them, and the lasting impact that they are having on Alaska Native communities.
    • Environmental Justice: Challenges of Contaminated Site Cleanup in Rural AK

      Williams, Paula; Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      Efforts to clean up contaminated sites from military installations and other sources have been ongoing in Alaska since the 1980s, and new sites continue to be identified. Most Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. Cleanup projects that are begun may take many years to complete due to the complicated nature of each site. Since 1990, over 5,300 sites have been cleanup up; more than 2,200 sites remain open, including military installations (both abandoned and active), bulk fuel storage and gas stations, airports and airfields, maintenance facilities, and oil exploration, transport, and refining facilities.
    • Alaska Justice Forum ; Vol. 35, No. 1 (Summer 2018)

      UAA Justice Center; Cravez, Pamela; Williams, Paula (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-07-16)
      The Summer 2018 print edition of the Alaska Justice Forum focuses on environmental justice, exploring the ongoing challenges of cleaning up contaminated sites in Alaska in terms of the costs of cleanup and long-term impacts upon people and the environment. Alaska is ranked third in the U.S. for Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) properties. Most of these properties are in remote locations, placing a disproportionate impact on Alaska Native communities that depend upon environmental resources for their livelihood. This issue also looks at expanded eligibility and increased limits on Brownfields Program funds, which provide monies for assessment and cleanup of contaminants on property targeted for redevelopment. The Summer 2018 online edition includes all print stories, one of which has been expanded.
    • Sequential Intercept Model: Framework for a ‘Wicked Problem’

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      The Sequential Intercept Model offers conceptual points at which a person with serious mental illness could be diverted from the criminal justice system and into community-based treatment. This article reviews the 2015 book "The Sequential Intercept Model and Criminal Justice" (New York: Oxford University Press), which looks at the success of programs along the intercept continuum. A workshop on the model sponsored by the Alaska Department of Corrections will be held in Anchorage in May 2018.
    • Sexual Assault Kit Initiative: Alaska Making Progress

      Cravez, Pamela (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2018-04-02)
      Victim-centered policies being developed by the Alaska Department of Public Safety for processing unsubmitted and untested sexual assault kits collected by Alaska State Troopers are one part of the state’s efforts to tackle more than 3,000 untested kits under grants from the Sexual Assault Kit Initiative of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice.