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dc.contributor.authorTrummer, Lori
dc.contributor.authorMalone, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-23T19:32:54Z
dc.date.available2014-04-23T19:32:54Z
dc.date.issued2009-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11122/3198
dc.descriptionR10-S&PF-FHP-2009-3; This article was included in collection donated by Tom Malone.en_US
dc.description.abstractAs the non-timber forest products industry increases on a commercial scale, the need for assessments of tree health and sustainability of these practices also increases. Harvesting birch sap for subsistence purposes has occurred for decades but commercial interests in this process and resource is expanding. In this evaluation, we review literature related to birch sap harvesting practices, report on a pilot study that assessed impacts to birch trees from sap harvesting, and review the “Best Practices” guidelines for tree tapping developed by the Alaska Birch Syrupmakers’ Association.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Melissa Head, Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mining Land and Water (DMLW) for pictures and project permits, Megan Boldenow, formerly with Alaska Department of Natural Resources, DMLW, for pictures and site histories, and Marcie Menefee, Mental Health Land Trust, for project permits. We also thank Kimberley Maher for translated literature, pictures, and field assistance at Eva Creek. All pictures were taken by the authors or Kimberly Maher, except for Figures 1 and 2 which were taken by Megan Boldenow.en_US
dc.publisherUnited States Department of Agriculture, US Forest Service Alaska Region, State and Private Forestry Forest Health Protection, Anchorage Officeen_US
dc.titleSome impacts to paper birch trees tapped for sap harvesting in Alaskaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-24T14:09:55Z


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