• Maiyumerak Creek: late prehistoric subsistence and seasonality in northwest Alaska

      Shirar, Scott (2007-12)
      The Maiyumerak Creek Site (XBM-131) is a late prehistoric site located near the confluence of Maiyumerak Creek and the Noatak River in the Noatak National Preserve, Alaska. Excavations conducted at the site by the National Park Service during the 2006 field season focused on one of eight identified house pits. This thesis focuses on the faunal remains and artifacts collected from the living floor of this house (House Pit 8). The analysis centers on answering how subsistence resource use is reflected in the artifact and faunal assemblages and the relationship between these two classes of data. I also analyze the faunal remains to make an assessment of site seasonality.
    • Major impediments to a feasibility study in the case of Smith Bay development

      Hullavarad, Nilima V.; Perkins, Robert A.; Hulsey, J. Leroy; Connor, Billy G. (2017-05)
      The State of Alaska is one of the energy-producing states which rely on revenue from energy extraction, but faces several challenges, especially significant fluctuations in revenue generated by taxes. In the past, oil production from established oil fields on state land yielded sufficient tax revenue. For new sources of oil, oil company owners must make a decision about developing the prospects based on a feasibility study which produces preliminary design, cost estimates, project schedule, including many permits and other uncertainties, financing, and tax credits. When this study is done, the decision can be made to begin development. This paper considers the feasibility studies on main obstacles in the development path of Smith Bay. The evaluation of major tasks needed for a feasibility study, uncertainty and obstacles, combined with our estimation of the time period required for the oil fields to produce oil, led to an estimate of the time before tax money will be provided to the state.
    • Major nutrient distribution in relation to the physical structure of the Gulf of Alaska shelf

      Childers, Amy Ruehs (2001-08)
      The northern Gulf of Alaska is a biologically productive downwelling shelf. Nutrient sources supporting such productivity have not been adequately studied. Thirteen primary stations were occupied twelve times throughout 1998 and 1999 in an attempt to clarify nutrient distributions and sources. The shelf waters were warmer, fresher, lower in nitrate, and higher in phytoplankton biomass in the spring of 1998 compared to 1999. Nitrate, silicate, and phosphate were positively correlated with salinity indicating an offshore nutrient source. The largest rates of new production, estimated from nitrate drawdown in the upper layer between March and July/August, were 2.6 mmole nitrate m⁻² day⁻¹ in 1998 and 1.9 mmole nitrate m⁻² day⁻¹ in 1999. There was evidence of a summer onshore flux of dense, nutrient-rich bottom water when the downwelling regime relaxed or reversed. This seasonal flux was 20% less than the estimated nitrate flux through nearby Hinchinbrook Canyon.
    • The malleability of disciplinary identity

      Mericle, Megan E.; Stanley, Sarah; Farmer, Daryl; Brightwell, Gerri; Harney, Eileen (2017-05)
      This paper tracks the progress of a beginning undergraduate writer's disciplinary becoming. Much research in disciplinary identity focuses on graduate students and advanced undergraduate writers; however, sites of disciplinary identity formation also occur early on during the required first-year writing course. These sites are crucial because they inform the student writer's entrance into the academic conversation, and reveal the extent to which early assumptions about disciplinary roles affects further disciplinary identity formation. Drawing from Ivanič's framework of writer identity, this case study reveals the ever-shifting tensions of "disciplinary becoming." The analysis captures how a writer's discursive self shifts from a static disciplinary identity to a more malleable disciplinary identity through a cross-analysis of two separate writing assignments in order to learn how the student's petroleum engineer identity is performed, contradicted and re-negotiated. I argue that this shift will enable writing knowledge transfer and overall identity formation.
    • Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be cowboys: stories

      Goerger, Steve (2006-05)
      The stories of Mamas, Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys employ surreal plots and fabulist forms in an attempt to uncover the awe and wonder hidden in even the most trivial, mundane aspects of human life. The narrator of the title story, a time-traveling interstellar policeman, confronts the reality that his astounding occupation cannot gain him what he most desires, love; yet the confrontation itself rewards him with a tiny glimpse of love's existence. In 'L'Ecole du Ciel, ' the protagonist finds himself in a purgatory-cum-schoolhouse, where he must unlearn the futile knowledge he gained on Earth and submit unequivocally to his merciless school mistress. The result is a Candide like resolution; it suggests, as do all of these stories, that we 'cultivate our garden' and leave well-enough alone.
    • Mammalian mismatch repair: hotspots and protein complexes

      Matton, Nancy (2000-05)
      Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been found in hereditary cancers as well as in sporadic cancers, illustrating the importance of mismatch repair in maintaining genomic integrity. To determine if inefficient mismatch repair can contribute to hotspots of mutation, repair rates were determined 'in vivo' in mammalian cells for mismatched nucleotides located at H-ras codon 10 and compared to previously determined repair rates at a nearby activating hotspot of mutation, H-ras codon 12. Repair rates for H-ras codon 10 are significantly improved over repair rates at codon 12. This indicates that inefficiencies in mismatch repair are responsible, at least in part, for the well-documented hotspot of mutation at codon 12 and that surrounding sequence context can effect repair of mismatches. Gel-shift analysis demonstrates that the degree of binding by the initial mismatch recognition factor hMutS[alpha] (heterodimer of hMSH6 and hMSH2) correlates with 'in vivo' repair rates for each mismatch tested at the codon 12 location. UV cross-linking of nuclear proteins to G:A and G:T mismatches at codon 10 or codon 12 generally confirm these results. Overall this suggests that there is lowered efficiency in the kinetics of mismatch repair at codon 12, perhaps in the initiation step, rather than innaccurate repair leading to mutation. The interactions of specific mismatch repair proteins in human nuclear extracts were then examined to determine the proteins binding to mismatched DNA. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting indicates two novel complexes that exist in the absence of ATP: one consisting of hMSH2, hMSH6, hMLH1 and hPMS2 and the other consisting of hMSH2, hMSH6, hMLH1 and hPMS1. Furthermore, the protein complexes specifically bind to mismatched DNA and not to a similar homoduplex oligonucleotide. The protein complex-DNA interactions occur primarily through hMSH6, although hMSH2 can also become cross-linked to the mismatched substrate. In the presence of ATP, the binding of hMSH6 to mismatched DNA is decreased. In addition, hMLH1, hPMS2 and hPMS1 no longer interact with each other or with the hMutS[alpha] complex. However, the ability of hMLH1 to co-immunoprecipitate mismatched DNA 'increases' in the presence of ATP, suggesting a role for hMLH1 in subsequent ATP-dependent repair processes.
    • Management implications of moving from a traditional structured systems development methodology to object-orientation

      Tomasic, Jinlan (2003-05)
      As software application systems become larger and more complex, many software employers and managers believe that the key to sustaining its competitive advantage in the computing technology market lies in its software engineering capabilities. Software crisis situation seems to be a common occurrence in the software development environment as systems become larger and more complex. Object Orientation (OO) has been proposed as a viable alternative to traditional approach (i.e., structured techniques), an approach that many hope will solve the current software crisis. 00 is a new paradigm, and it requires new types of knowledge, new specialists, and significant changes in the mindset, an entirely different way of thinking, representing and solving a problem. The transition of moving toward the 00 from the traditional approach may involve a high risk of failure if the managers do not understand the nature of paradigm shifts and do not anticipate the future. The problem of moving to 00 has become very important. An understanding of potential problems from migrating to the new paradigm helps managers make a smoother paradigm shift. The implications and challenges of the 00 paradigm are presented. The study suggests that Object-Oriented System Development (OOSD) requires more discipline, management and training than traditional software development does. Education and experience are keys for the success of any OOSD project.
    • Management of large interdisciplinary team science projects: a multi-methods approach to examining competencies

      Veazey, Alice Danielson; Monahan, John; Cahill, Catherine; Daniel, Mary Jo; Taylor, Karen (2017-05)
      Over the past fifty years, the world has experienced a significant increase in the scale and complexity of scientific research that is focused on society's most important issues. This type of research requires a team approach from people with diverse skill sets working together across multiple disciplines, and that trend is reflected in a significant rise in collaborative research. "Team science" is the focus of research efforts intent on better understanding the challenges and maximizing the effectiveness of collaborative research. Projects that involve large teams of scientists require a thoughtful and planned approach to leadership and management in order to achieve the stated goals and outcomes. The science community has recognized that in order to run effective team science projects, people must identify the knowledge, skills, attitudes, values and beliefs that define the competency set for large-scale team science leadership and management. This study used a mixed-methods approach to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data through group concept mapping to develop a concept map of the competencies required to lead and manage large, interdisciplinary team science programs. These results were then used as a lens to examine the competencies identified through the content analysis of hiring documents for positions related to a broad spectrum of team science efforts. Expert team science managers defined a list of five critical competencies: project management, shared leadership, personal competence, social competence and communication. Analysis revealed that hiring practices do not identify these skill sets in position descriptions and announcements, typically focusing on project management and communication and neglecting the remaining three competencies. In order to hire people capable of managing large science teams, hiring practices, training programs and career tracks must be developed and align with these core competencies.
    • Managing The National Wildlife Refuge System With Climate Change: The Interaction Of Policy, Perceptions, And Ecological Knowledge

      Magness, Dawn Robin (2009)
      The National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) is committed to conserving fish, wildlife, and plants for current and future generations of Americans. Given a rapidly changing climate, managers may employ various adaptation strategies to meet legislated mandates. I explore how ecological context, policy, perceptions and available ecological knowledge inform adaptation strategies. In Chapter 2, I develop an ecosystem vulnerability framework to better understand how climate change risk and ecosystem resilience interact to impact the NWRS. With GIS, I rank refuges based on historic temperature change, historic precipitation change, and sea-level rise risk. To index resilience, I rank refuges based on refuge size, landscape road density, and elevation range. Using this GIS analysis and the ecosystem vulnerability framework, I categorize the 527 refuges into four groups (refugia, ecosystem maintenance, facilitate transitions, and experiments in natural adaptation) that provide a necessary context for national, strategic adaptation planning. In Chapter 3, I survey 32% of NWRS biologists and managers to understand how policy and their perceptions of climate change influence adaptation choice. Currently, managers and biologists independently decide if climate change is natural or anthropogenic for wildlife management, and this conceptualization becomes important for deciding whether reactionary or anticipatory adaptation approaches are more appropriate. Although respondents considered practicability, they prefer historic condition. Respondents also prefer ecosystems and species adapt naturally. In a rapidly changing climate, natural adaptation may not be feasible without large-scale extinction. Nonetheless, many biologists and managers are uncomfortable with the alternative of manipulating ecosystems and species assemblages toward future conditions. Finally, understanding climate change impacts requires the analysis of complex ecological relationships over time and this complexity creates another barrier for implementing a national adaptation strategy. In Chapter 4, using a data-mining approach on data from scaled-down GCMs and an atypical monitoring approach, I build bioclimatic envelope models to show how the distributions of two passerines will potentially shift in response to climate change over the next 100 years on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. In order to effectively manage species within the context of strategic adaptation planning, the NWRS must design future biological monitoring approaches with spatial modeling in mind.
    • Mapping and predicting the ionospheric effects to communication systems in northern aurora areas using the global positioning system

      Wang, Lingyun (2002-08)
      This thesis focuses on mapping and predicting ionospheric effects to communication systems in northern high latitude areas using GPS (Global Positioning System). The monitoring of ionospheric scintillation and TEC (Total Electron Content) over Fairbanks, Alaska has been achieved by using the GSV4004 GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC Monitor (GISTM), which has been installed on the roof of Duckering Building at UAF since September 2001. The algorithm of acquiring equivalent vertical TEC above Fairbanks from various satellite measurements is given in detail. Both an empirical ionosphere model, IRI, and a physics-based ionosphere model, PIM, are used to verify the TEC real field measurement. Another signal estimation method, BP neural network, is used to forecast the TEC short-term variation, which can give better performance than the other two. The relationships among TEC, amplitude scintillation and phase scintillation are analyzed. Multipath effects and the impact to GPS performance from ionospheric scintillation are discussed. Lastly the TEC and scintillation index mapping around Fairbanks is presented.
    • Mapping impacts of education for wilderness management planning

      Foster, Frederick Anthony (1998)
      Wilderness education is considered a key response to abate physical impacts caused by wilderness recreationists, but education's impacts upon the psychological values of wilderness are unknown. This investigation used a wilderness purism scale to measure how minimum impact instruction affects the intensity and quality of a student's wilderness experience and the relation of these expectations and preferences to appreciation, knowledge, and concern for the environment as a whole, i.e., environmental literacy. A wilderness purism scale, a spatial scale, and wilderness management scale measured how wilderness education affects recreationists' limits of unacceptability in wilderness conditions. Effects of wilderness education on multiple perceptions of wilderness specific to particular groups, are explained. Methods of how these can be collected, organized, and mapped using a GIS approach are demonstrated and techniques to build a wilderness experience typology are outlined. The investigation determined that environmental literacy is correlated with wilderness purism. Student's expectations and ethical perspectives toward wilderness became stronger following wilderness leadership education courses, specifically, their perceptions of wildness, experiential factors, and ethical perspectives of the wilderness experience. Educational programs increased respondents' wilderness perceptions and their desired spatial buffer distances from unacceptable conditions in wilderness. Distances from sights and sounds were found to be critical to wildemess recreationists' wilderness experience relating to sensing unacceptable conditions inside wilderness boundaries and "knowing" that unacceptable (human-made) conditions do not exist. Educators may use the findings to better design and assess their program's effectiveness. Results of the methodology could aid Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) process for wilderness planning. Wilderness managers may use the protocol to plan for the maintenance of wilderness opportunities to meet increasing demands brought about by education. Management must be prepared to protect suitable conditions for this potentially growing population. If managers zone wilderness accordingly to wilderness purism groups, they can protect vast areas from bio/physical impacts by using the processes described in this study. It is a tool for managing wilderness areas for a range of wilderness experiences which will aid in insuring protection of wildlife, ecosystem integrity, and native biodiversity.
    • Mapping landscape values and forest uses on the Tongass National Forest

      Schroeder, Britta; Verbyla, David; Brinkman, Todd; Fix, Peter (2014-05)
      Throughout the world, humans are often faced with the challenge of sustaining economic development while also promoting environmental stewardship. Such is true for the management history of the Tongass National Forest, where the U.S. Forest Service is transitioning away from harvesting old-growth and moving towards a more economically and environmentally sustainable approach. To measure the preferences of local community members affected by this transition, I conducted an interdisciplinary case study on the Wrangell Ranger District in Southeast Alaska. Community members from Wrangell mapped landscape values, acceptable and unacceptable forest uses. By assessing these landscape values and forest uses with respondents' attitudes towards forest management alternatives, I identify spatial locations of conflicting timber harvest uses and recommend forest management objectives for the district. Through public participation, communities can provide spatially explicit input during the planning process, which creates opportunities for managers to incorporate community needs and better prioritize management objectives.
    • Mapping methods and observations of surficial snow/ice cover at Redoubt and Pavlof volcanoes, Alaska using optical satellite imagery

      Rahilly, Kristen E.; Dehn, Jonathan; Pettit, Erin; Webley, Peter (2014-08)
      Alaska is a natural laboratory for the study of how active volcanism interacts with underlying seasonal snow, perennial snow, and glacial ice cover. While over half of the historically active volcanoes in Alaska have some degree of perennial snow or glacial ice, all Alaskan volcanoes have a covering of seasonal snow for a period of time throughout the year. Previous research has centered on how volcanic deposits erode away the underlying snow/ice cover during an eruption, producing volcanic mudflows called lahars. Less emphasis has been placed on how variations in the snow/ice cover substrate effect the efficiency of meltwater generation during a volcanic eruption. Glacial ice, perennial snow, and seasonal snow can all contribute significantly to meltwater, and therefore the variations in the types of snow/ice cover present at Alaskan volcanoes must be analyzed. By examining the changing spatial extent of seasonal snow present at a volcano during multiple Alaskan summers, the approximate boundaries of perennial snow and ice can be mapped as the snow/ice cover consistently present at the end of each ablation season. In this study, two methods of snow/ice cover mapping for Redoubt and Pavlof volcanoes are analyzed for efficiency and accuracy. Identification of the best method allows for mapping of the snow/ice cover consistently present during each Alaskan summer month over at least two different years. These maps can serve as approximations for the snow/ice cover likely to be present at both volcanoes during each summer month. Volcanic deposits produced during the 2009 Redoubt and 2013 Pavlof eruptions are spatially linked to these snow/ice cover maps so that future research can focus on the interaction between deposits and type of snow/ice substrate. Additional observations and conclusions are made regarding how the visible snow/ice cover varies during and after each eruption.
    • Margaret Keenan Harrais: A Biography In Four Voices

      Doetschman, Sarah; Carr, Richard (2011)
      Narrative strategies available to biography are explored through the life of Margaret Keenan Harrais---teacher, educational administrator, judge, and activist. Biography is a particular endeavor requiring flexible inquiry and creative presentation. Margaret is viewed through multiple lenses that explore personhood, encourage readers' introspection, and imply the importance of the individual in history. The four voices indicated in the title of this dissertation are editorial, analytical, sparsely Romantic, and expository. This biography aims to complicate readers' notions of what it means to be a person in relation to other people by focusing closely on selected episodes in Margaret's career; analyzing their historical, social, and literary import; and finally broadening the perspective to include the entirety of Margaret's life. The roles of the biographer and the reader are examined throughout in an attempt to explore the interconnections between biography and autobiography. Margaret's life is presented within the contexts of other women teachers in rural areas, as well as other men and women who wrote about territorial Alaska for a non-Alaskan audience. At heart this biography seeks to experiment with the narrative possibilities available to biographers, and to explore the ways in which the effects of these narratives allow for the contribution to general scholarship on the basis of particular experiences.
    • Marine associated bird and mammal habitat use at the Five Finger Lighthouse Island

      Beraha, Lori (2018-07)
      In summer 2017 I studied the abundance and distribution of marine associated birds and mammals from four observational points on the southernmost of the Five Finger Islands (FFI). My objectives were (1) to identify the areas of highest habitat use by species of conservation concern, and (2) to use this information to make recommendations for an ecosystem-based management plan at the Five Finger Lighthouse Island (FFLI). I found higher relative abundance and higher biodiversity of both birds and marine mammals on the South and West facing sectors compared to the North and East facing sectors. I attribute this to the greater habitat complexity that comprises a near-shore reef, a mixed kelp forest, and a channel between the reef and the side of the island with the highest cliff, areas used extensively for foraging, nesting, traveling, socializing, and resting by many of the documented species. I therefore recommend avoiding development and minimizing anthropogenic disturbance on the southern and western portions of the island including the adjacent reef and channel between the reef and island. As both the FFI ecosystem and the Five Finger Lighthouse (FFL) management continue to evolve in response to changing environmental conditions and human needs, this study provides a useful baseline for future comparison. Continued study and monitoring is also recommended at this site to inform future adaptive management, document changes over time, and engage community stakeholders in science and conservation.
    • Marine mammal and fishery interactions on the Copper River Delta and in Prince William Sound, Alaska

      Matkin, Craig O. (1980-12)
      An assessment of rate of damage to netted fishes and to fishing gear caused by marine mammals, and of rate of incidental catch and kill of marine mammals by fishermen, was undertaken for the salmon drift gillnet fisheries of the Copper River-Prince William Sound area, Alaska, in 1977 and 1978. Amounts of damage to netted fishes ranged from approximately 1.8 to 8.3 percent of the total catch. Damages were attributed to Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus), which also were responsible for the majority of damages to nets, and to harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). Of the approximately 1000 mammals incidentally killed in 1978, about half were harbor seals and 40% were sea lions; the remainder were harbor and Dali porpoises (Phocoena phoccoena and Phocoenoides dalli) and sea otters (Enhydra tutris). Recommendations are made for modification of fishing methods to reduce the damages by and incidental kill of marine mammals.
    • Marine-derived nutrients in riverine ecosystems: developing tools for tracking movement and assessing effects in food webs on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

      Rinella, Daniel J. (2010-05)
      Marine-derived nutrients (MDN) delivered by spawning Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) contribute to the productivity of riverine ecosystems. Optimizing methods for measuring MDN assimilation in food webs will foster the development of ecologically based resource management approaches. This dissertation aims to better understand relationships among spawning salmon abundance, biochemical measures of MDN assimilation, and the fitness of stream-dwelling fishes. The goals of my first research chapter were (1) to understand the factors that influence stable isotope ([delta]¹³C, [delta]¹⁵N, and [delta]³⁴S) and fatty acid measures of MDN assimilation in stream and riparian biota, and (2) to examine the ability of these measures to differentiate among sites that vary in spawning salmon biomass. For all biota studied, stable isotopes and fatty acids indicated that MDN assimilation increased with spawner abundance. Among Dolly Varden (Salvelinus malma), larger individuals assimilated proportionately more MDN. Seasonal effects were detected for aquatic macroinvertebrates and riparian horsetail (Equisetum fluviatile), but not for Dolly Varden. Of all dependent variables, Dolly Varden [delta]¹⁵N had the clearest relationship with spawner abundance, making this a good measure for monitoring MDN assimilation. Expanding on these results, two chapters examined potential fisheries management applications. The first sought to identify spawner levels above which stream-dwelling Dolly Varden and coho salmon (O. kisutch) parr cease to gain physiological benefits associated with MDN. RNA-DNA ratios (an index of recent growth rate) and energy density indicated saturation responses where values increased rapidly with spawner abundance up to approximately 1 kg/m² and then leveled off. In coho salmon parr, energy density and RNA-DNA ratios correlated significantly with [delta]¹⁵N. These results show strong linkages between MDN and fish fitness responses, while the saturation points may indicate spawner densities that balance salmon harvest with the ecological benefits of MDN. The second application tested a quick and inexpensive method for estimating, spawning salmon abundance based on [delta]¹⁵N in stream-dwelling fishes. Estimates made with coho salmon pair were unbiased, tightly correlated with observed values, and had a mean absolute deviation of 1.4 MT spawner biomass/km. Application of this method would allow estimates of annual escapement to be made on a potentially large number of streams.
    • Marine-entry timing and growth rates of juvenile chum salmon in Alaskan waters of the Chukchi and northern Bering Seas

      Vega, Stacy L.; Sutton, Trent; Adkison, Milo; Murphy, James (2015-08)
      Recent climate change is most pronounced in the Arctic, with many implications for juvenile salmon life-history patterns, such as altered timing of migrations and/or timing and success of life-history stages. The objectives of this study were to determine the timing of marine entry and early marine growth of juvenile Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta in the Chukchi and northern Bering seas. Sagittal otoliths were collected from juvenile Chum Salmon in summers 2007, 2012, and 2013 via surface trawls in the southern Chukchi and northern Bering seas. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to discriminate between freshwater and marine environments, and daily growth increments were counted to determine marine-entry dates and growth rates of juvenile Chum Salmon to make temporal and regional comparisons of juvenile characteristics. Marine-entry dates ranged from mid-June to mid-July, with all region and year combinations exhibiting similar characteristics with respect to entry timing, i.e., larger individuals at the time of capture entered the marine environment earlier in the growing season than smaller individuals. Juvenile growth rates were estimated to be, on average, 4.9 % body weight per day in both regions in summers 2007 and 2012, and 6.8% body weight per day in the Chukchi Sea in 2013. This study shows consistent conditions among regions with respect to juvenile Chum Salmon marine-entry timing, with some variation in growth rates. These results provide a novel and more thorough evaluation of juvenile Chum Salmon early life-history characteristics in the Alaskan Arctic and provide a baseline for comparisons with future climate change studies.
    • Market impacts and global implications of U.S. shale development and hydraulic fracturing: an economic, engineering, and environmental perspective

      Umweke, Maduabuchi Pascal; Baek, Jungho; Patil, Shirish; Perkins, Robert; Reynolds, Douglas (2018-05)
      The United States oil industry is experiencing a revolution because of significant oil production from tight oil plays since the mid-2000s. Advancements in horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing are powering this new chapter in oil development. Increased oil production has brought billions of dollars of new revenue to oil companies involved in tight oil exploration and production, new jobs in the oil industry, and more tax revenue to oil regions around the U.S. However, tight oil resources do not only exist in the U.S. An understanding of the U.S. tight oil development experience could bring value to stakeholders within and outside the United States, and provide lessons and templates applicable in other tight oil regions. This research examines the U.S. tight oil experience and draws lessons for aspiring tight oil regions on the engineering, economic, and environmental fronts. On the economic front, I have examined an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model on key oil industry macroeconomic data (West Texas Intermediate oil price, tight oil production, and rig count) from 2007 through 2016, and the impact of oil price on tight oil development for the Bakken, Eagle Ford, Niobrara, and Permian tight oil plays. The results show that oil companies in different plays react differently to oil price signals and do so in relation to oil field development characteristics. In addition, oil production and drilling intensity in the Eagle Ford play is found to be most responsive to oil price increases than the Permian, Bakken, or Niobrara oil plays. The Permian play was most resilient during the 2014 through 2016 oil price plunge. Oil production does not fall in response to a decrease in oil price, equally as it rises in response to oil price increase. Tight oil operators are quicker in bringing drilling rigs to service as prices rise than they take them away in response to falling oil prices, but do reduce drilling significantly in response to an oil price plunge. These results have significant ramifications for operators and assets in the respective oil plays or future plays with similar development characteristics. On the engineering front, I used petroleum engineering oil production forecasting Decline Curve Analysis techniques, the Drillinginfo Software, and historical development data of U.S. plays, to conduct oil production forecast for seven U.S. tight oil plays. Forecast results are shown to be comparable to forecasts by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Building on previous EIA geologic studies on non-U.S. tight oil plays, and by selecting best analogues from within U.S. tight oil plays, I have completed an economic assessment and uncertainty analysis for 10 non-U.S. tight plays using a simple fiscal tax regime. The results indicate that the Eagle Ford play in Mexico, the Vaca Muerta play in Argentina, and the Qingshankou play in China rank highest among the plays studied. Of oil price, royalty rate, discount rate, well cost, extraction tax, and recovery factor parameters evaluated, results indicate that oil price and well cost are among the biggest drivers of profitability in these plays. On the environmental front, I conducted case studies on the busiest U.S. tight oil plays (Bakken and Eagle Ford) and examined the impact of tight oil development on the environment. Local solutions to environmental challenges alongside environmental regulations are discussed and presented as possible templates for other aspiring plays. Since securing freshwater sources alongside wastewater management emerge as major issues in tight oil development, a cost comparison is conducted for reused water disposal versus one-use water disposal options, for a hypothetical development. Results indicate that on a cost-per-well basis, the reduction in water disposal volume from subsurface frack flowback retention improves water reuse economics; the water reuse option is preferable to one-use water disposal for U.S. oil plays. This result points to potential cost savings for reused water disposal in regions such as the Bakken with few disposal wells.