• Doppler sodar observations of the winds and structure in the lower atmosphere over Fairbanks, Alaska

      Kankanala, Pavan Kumar Reddy (2007-12)
      Fairbanks, Alaska (64°49ʹ N, 147°52ʹ W) experiences strong temperature inversions which when combined with the low wind speeds prevailing during the winter cause serious air pollution problems. The SODAR (Sound Detection And Ranging) or acoustic sounder is a very useful instrument for studying the lower atmosphere as it can continuously and reliably measure the vertical profiles of wind speed and direction,vertical motions, turbulence and the thermal structure in the lower part of the troposphere. A Doppler sodar was operated from December 2005 to April 2006 at the National Weather Service site in Fairbanks. The wind observations from the sodar indicate that the majority of the winds during the winter months were from the North, Northeast or the East, which is in good agreement with the radiosonde measurements and the long term trends in the wind patterns over Fairbanks area. Case studies were carried out using the sodar data depicting drainage winds, low-level jets, formation and breakup of inversions and estimation of the mixing layer height.