• Alaska Native females: understanding body image dissatisfaction in a culturally diverse country

      Naegele, Karaline M.; Cook, Christine; Renes, Susan; Harrison, Lynn (2013-05)
      The current study was conducted to expand literature on body image dissatisfaction (BID) in Alaska Native females. As BID has been a concern for European American females, and many minority groups in America, professionals should examine all cultural groups for the presence of BID. The research was comprised of qualitative interviewing methods. Interviews were conducted with Alaska Native female participants between the ages of 18 and 23 years, attending the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Research questions addressed whether or not Alaska Native females experience BID, and if so how BID develops and manifests for this population. The study found that all participants experienced BID beginning in adolescence. The development and manifestation of BID varied on an individual basis, reflecting other research findings.
    • A comprehensive review of the literature surrounding the adolescent experience of a parent's amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis diagnosis

      Johnson, Emily R.; Gifford, Valerie; Cook, Christine; Billings, Frederick (2016)
      Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neuro-muscular disease causing progressive paralysis and eventual death of the patient. Adolescent children who have a parent with ALS or other terminal illnesses have ability to comprehend the course of the disease's processes, death and the suffering of others, which often leads to the teen experiencing existential issues including loneliness, meaninglessness, a lack of personal freedom or responsibility, and a fear of death. The following research paper provides a thorough review of the literature surrounding the effects of a parental ALS diagnosis on adolescent development, existential concerns and grief response. Suggestions for resolving existential concerns and grief are presented. The knowledge gained from the literature review was used to create a web-based resource for adolescent children of ALS patients. The application and product portions of this paper contain a thorough description of the web-based resource, the information it contains, and ways that it can be useful to adolescents and members of their support system.
    • The effects of volitional laughter on positive and negative affect and depressive symptoms

      Krauss, Gregory W. (1997-05)
      The effects of volitional laughter on positive affect, negative affect, and day-to-day depressive symptoms among college students were investigated utilizing a non-equivalent control group design. The laughter group (n = 23) participated in daily volitional laughter treatments (three treatments of 30 seconds each) while the control group (n = 40) received no treatment. Both groups were pre- and post-tested using the PANAS (Positive And Negative Affect Schedule) and the CES-D (Center for Epidemiological Studies -Depression Inventory). A significant difference was found for the laughter group in negative affect. An additional post-hoc analysis, after eliminating a group of subjects from the control group, indicated a significant difference for the volitional laughter treatment group in increasing positive affect. No significant difference in depressive symptoms was detected.
    • #effyourbeautystandards: message construction in the body positivity movement on Instagram

      Bahr, Nike; May, Amy; DeCaro, Peter; Hum, Richard (2018-05)
      Beauty is a socially constructed concept that delineates specific characteristics of physical appearance which are to be perceived as aesthetically pleasing. In Western cultures, the ideal of this constructed beauty can be found to center on thinness. Reinforced through media images, the thin ideal can lead to internalization and increased body dissatisfaction in female viewers. To counteract body dissatisfaction resulting from internalization of these ideals, advocators on the social media platform Instagram can be seen to popularize the concept of body positivity. The resulting social movement aims at enabling individuals who do not fit the normed thin ideal to develop a benevolent approach to their physique. In the analysis of a sample of 280 Instagram posts concerned with the body positivity movement, a clear trend towards an adjusted construction of self-presentation was observed that clearly differs from socially enforced norms of beauty and ideal body size. When constructing posts that are concerned with body positivity, users of Instagram adjust the creation of their digital personality to fit the norms of imperfection and honesty inherent in the movement. Interviews conducted by the researcher further confirmed that the public recognizes that the messages communicated within this movement reveal personal stories and insecurities to both function as inspiration and motivation to the audience while also constituting a means of receiving validation.
    • Exploring supportive and defensive communication behavior and psychological safety between supervisors and their subordinates

      Strehl, Mary E.; Sager, Kevin L.; DeCaro, Peter A.; Jarrett, Brian (2015-05)
      This project explores the relationship between supportive and defensive communication behavior and psychological safety in the organizational setting. A paper and pencil survey measuring team psychological safety and supportive and defensive communication behaviors was administered to participants in the northwestern region of the United States. Supervisor use of supportive communication behavior was hypothesized to be positively correlated with employee psychological safety. Support was found for the hypothesis. This research sought to expand the scope of our understanding of psychological safety in an organizational setting while highlighting the benefits of using supportive communication behavior.
    • Fostering leadership in high school female athletes through sports psychology and goal setting

      Kriegmont, Gretchen; Cook, Christine; Wilson, Hilary; Morotti, Allan (2016)
    • The malleability of disciplinary identity

      Mericle, Megan E.; Stanley, Sarah; Farmer, Daryl; Brightwell, Gerri; Harney, Eileen (2017-05)
      This paper tracks the progress of a beginning undergraduate writer's disciplinary becoming. Much research in disciplinary identity focuses on graduate students and advanced undergraduate writers; however, sites of disciplinary identity formation also occur early on during the required first-year writing course. These sites are crucial because they inform the student writer's entrance into the academic conversation, and reveal the extent to which early assumptions about disciplinary roles affects further disciplinary identity formation. Drawing from Ivanič's framework of writer identity, this case study reveals the ever-shifting tensions of "disciplinary becoming." The analysis captures how a writer's discursive self shifts from a static disciplinary identity to a more malleable disciplinary identity through a cross-analysis of two separate writing assignments in order to learn how the student's petroleum engineer identity is performed, contradicted and re-negotiated. I argue that this shift will enable writing knowledge transfer and overall identity formation.
    • Meeting the bereavement needs of older adults with cognitive challenges

      Glendinning, Terry; Renes, Susan; Dahl, Heather; McMorrow, Samantha (2017-06)
      Approximately 5.5 million people in the United States are living with cognitive challenges such as Alzheimer's and other dementias. People with cognitive challenges, following the death of a loved one, often experience unacknowledged grief. This paper first describes grief as it occurs in older adults who are not cognitively challenged. This is followed by a review of literature focusing on the grief of older adults with cognitive challenges. The project looks at methods for accommodating the cognitive and communication needs of this population as they work through their grief process.