• Effects of antimony mining on stream invertebrates and primary producers in Denali National Park, Alaska

      Wedemeyer, Kathleen (1987-12)
      Heavy metals, primarily antimony, arsenic and manganese from antimony mines in Denali National Park, Alaska impacted all levels of the stream ecosystem. Decreased algal, moss and macroinvertebrate abundance (but not changes in macroinvertebrate trophic organization) were all clearly associated with mining activity in Slate and Eldorado creeks. Crustacea, Chironomidae (Diptera), Hydracarina (Arachnida), Nemouridae (Plecoptera), and Zapada (Nemouridae) decreased in relative abundance with metal pollution while Capniidae (Plecoptera), Nemoura (Nemouridae), and Podmosta (Nemouridae) increased in relative abundance at mine sites. The data from Stampede Creek demonstrated that mineralized but unmined stream reaches may be impacted by heavy metals. Unexpectedly higher selenium levels upstream of the mine may account for the general lack of substantial differences in macroinvertebrates and periphyton upstream and downstream of the mine. However, macroinvertebrate and periphyton abundances were lower at both sites on Stampede Creek than at the unmined control stream, Jumbo Creek.