• Integrating local and traditional knowledge and historical sources to characterize run timing and abundance of eulachon in the Chilkat and Chilkoot rivers

      Olds, Allyson Leigh; McPhee, Megan; Beaudreau, Anne; Carothers, Courtney; Ryan, Brad (2016-08)
      Eulachon smelt Thaleichthys pacificus are anadromous forage fish of the North Pacific Ocean that annually spawn in coastal rivers of North America in late winter and early spring. These spawning runs range from northern California to southwestern Alaska and provide important resources to nearby communities, indigenous cultures, and wildlife predators. However, eulachon life history is not well understood or documented throughout their range. In recent years, concerns for eulachon population abundances in the southern portions of their range have led to federal protection. Though there are no federal listings in Alaska, there have been local concerns documented for eulachon runs of the Chilkat and Chilkoot rivers since approximately 1990. However, eulachon run timing and abundance trends are difficult to detect due to limited available data and variability in eulachon runs. To document baseline information and explore patterns of eulachon runs of the Chilkat and Chilkoot rivers, we sought local and traditional knowledge from residents of nearby communities to document information about local uses, run timing, abundance, and wildlife observations related to eulachon runs. Observations of eulachon runs were integrated with historical records from newspaper articles and scientific reports to construct temporal trends in eulachon run timing and abundance. Based on the findings of this study, annual eulachon runs of the Chilkat and Chilkoot rivers generally occur for about a week or two between mid-April and mid-May. The arrival dates of eulachon runs often vary from year to year, but the timing appears to have shifted earlier, from mid-May to mid-April, over the past couple of decades. Abundance records were not sufficient to quantify trends. However, qualitative information regarding abundance did not suggest any clear trends in eulachon abundances of the Chilkat and Chilkoot rivers over the years, nor did there appear to be prominent local concerns about abundance declines. Many respondents suggested that eulachon populations were naturally too variable to be able to describe trends in abundance. Interviews also provided insight into local perspectives on eulachon life history and ecology. These results suggest that variability in eulachon run timing and abundance could be related to environmental conditions, including tidal height, river habitat, and water temperature. For a data-limited species like eulachon, integrating local observations and historical records offers a promising approach to documenting baseline information and improving the scientific understanding of eulachon runs and other environmental phenomena.
    • Integrating music activities into a school counselor's grief group with youth

      Lane, Teesha M.; Renes, Susan; McMorrow, Samantha; Hart, Debra (2017-12)
      The efficacy of Music Therapy interventions for young people experiencing grief is the focus of the project. A review of the existing literature on group work in schools demonstrates the importance of utilizing creative counseling methods with students who experience grief. Although research suggests that music-enhanced group counseling work can be effective, there are few resources available to school counselors who see a need for an effective group counseling curriculum that utilizes music for grieving youth. This project aims to provide school counselors with a music-enhanced curriculum that can assist a group of students through their grief process.
    • Intelligent platform management interface protocol security

      Clayton, Syler W.; Hay, Brian; Nance, Kara; Genetti, Jon (2014-04)
      The Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI) is a protocol that allows administrators to manage servers remotely. Hardware vendors including Dell, HP, Supermicro, IBM, Lenovo, Fujitsu and Oracle support IPMI though a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) which can either be integrated into the motherboard or purchased as a pluggable module. The BMC runs silently alongside other components of the server and provides a lower level of hardware access than the Operating System (OS). This allows support for features like power cycling the server, mounting virtual media and accessing a remote console. The failure of BMC vendors to produce a more secure product, along with the inherent flaws of the IPMI protocol, increases the need for these systems' security capabilities to be evaluated. The IPMI protocol and various vendor implementations of the BMC has been the subject of recent scrutiny, and initial investigation has raised concerns about the security properties of these components. This project focuses on evaluating specific IPMI supported hardware and software setup in an environment modeled to simulate real use, for the explicit purpose of evaluating the security of the system. This project presents: several methods by which unprivileged users can gain remote access to the system, a list of best practices for proper configuration, a guide to clearing configuration settings before decommission, and a basic Metasploit module to scan for BMC related services.
    • Intelligent traffic monitoring and control system

      Ch, Nabil Al Nahin; Raskovic, Dejan; Thorsen, Denise; Hatfield, Michael (2019-08)
      This thesis presents an intelligent system for monitoring and controlling traffic by sensing vehicles' attributes and using communication between vehicles and roadside infrastructures. The goal of this system is to improve the safety of the commuters and help the drivers in making better decisions by providing them with additional information about the traffic conditions. A prototype system consisting of a roadside unit (RSU) and an on-board unit (OBU) was developed to test the functionalities of the proposed system. The RSU consists of sensors for detecting vehicles and estimating their attributes and a radio for communicating with the OBU. The OBU also has a radio for communication purpose. Afterward, a vehicle was used to test the functionalities of the system and the communication between OBU and RSU was evaluated by emulating the presence of a vehicle. A protocol for exchanging messages between the RSU and the OBU was developed to support effective communication. The efficiency of the communication process was further improved by varying the transmission range of different messages. A format for the message was proposed to convey all the necessary information efficiently. The process of collecting vehicle data, processing them and extracting useful information from the data was discussed here along with some limitations of the proposed system.
    • Intentional Mentor Training: Supporting Adolescent Males Coping with Fatherlessness or Having an Absent Father by Equipping Male Mentors

      Tichenor, Benjamin; Renes, Susan L.; McMorrow, Samantha G.; Topkok, Sean A. (2016)
      This project answers the research question: How could male mentorship support adolescent males coping with fatherlessness or having an absent father? Through evaluating relevant research linked to fatherlessness and absent fathers and mentorship, an application component comprising of a video training and training manual were created for equipping male mentors to intentionally support adolescent males coping with fatherlessness or having an absent father. By utilizing the academic literature defining mentorship and father involvement and integrating the research on effective mentoring relationship practices, culturally relevant resiliency factors, and effective mentoring in foster care, this mentor training could improve the trajectory for reaching the academic, career, and life goals of adolescent males coping with fatherlessness or having an absent father.
    • Inter-decadal change in sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, growth and maturity in the Northeast Pacific Ocean

      Howard, Katy B.; Adkison, Milo D.; Hillgruber, Nicola; Sigler, Michael F. (2008-08)
      Errors in growth and maturity estimates can drastically affect the spawner-per-recruit threshold used to recommend commercial fish catch quotas. Growth and maturity parameters for Alaskan sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, have not been updated for stock assessment purposes for 20 years, even though sablefish aging has continued. In this study, the old length-stratified data set (1981-1993) was updated and corrected for bias. In addition, newer, randomly collected samples (1996-2004) were analyzed, and new length-at-age, weight-at-age, and maturity-at-age and length parameters were estimated. A comparison of the two datasets showed that in recent years, sablefish are growing larger and maturing later and that growth and maturity differ somewhat among regions. The updated growth information improves data fits in the sablefish stock assessment model. It also provides results that are biologically reasonable. These updated and improved estimates of sablefish growth and maturity help ensure the continued proper management of this commercially important species in Alaskan waters.
    • Inter-individual variation in gene expression in torpid and interbout euthermic Arctic ground squirrels

      Burman, Adlai Max (2006-12)
      Alaskan Arctic ground squirrels, Spermophilus paryii, hibernate about seven months per year. During two-week torpor periods, respiration, circulation, metabolism, and catabolism are dramatically decreased, except for brief periods of interbout euthermia. These divergent hibernation states provide a particularly compelling model for variance-based studies of global gene expression. A guiding hypothesis in this Thesis is that Arctic ground squirrels exit interbout euthermia and enter torpor with an invariant metabolic scaffolding of various metabolites that are erected to serve as a ready metabalome for the challenges of the next brief return to euthermia. To develop this hypothesis further, I performed an exploratory data analysis of high-density mouse cDNA micro arrays cross-hybridized with Arctic ground squirrel mRNA to measure transcriptomes in brown adipose, skeletal muscle, and liver tissues. The results revealed that variation in transcript expression profiles were tissue specific and may reflect the degree to which tissues are active during hibernation. These results are encouraging. They justify a more thorough evaluation of the utility of using global variation in transcript expression patterns. In combination with a priori biological knowledge, these patterns will guide future studies into more detailed analyses of hibernation-state dependent and functionally relevant transcripts.
    • The interaction of Io and the Jovian magnetic field: Io's Alfven wings and particle acceleration

      Dols, Vincent (2001-08)
      Conditions for the formation of an electric field along the field lines of Jupiter crossing the satellite Io are investigated by examining the properties of Io's Alfven wave. A three-dimensional self-consistent MHD model, using a simplified magnetosphere description, illustrates the formation of this electric field and of Io's related auroral emission in the Jovian ionosphere. The Alfven wing properties between Io and Jupiter are studied with a one-dimensional MHD model and a realistic magnetosphere. Any change in the Io/Jupiter system affects the structure of the Alfven wing and likely affects the structure of Io's auroral emissions. This emission is likely structured in multi-spots and the angle between the first spot and the instantaneous projection of Io is less than 3°. In the limited context of the 1D approximation, the acceleration mechanism is expected close to Jupiter.
    • Interaction of two tributary glacier branches and implications for surge behavior

      Knowles, Christopher P.; Truffer, Martin; Larsen, Chris; Newman, David; Wackerbauer, Renate (2018-05)
      A glacier surge is a dynamic phenomenon where the glacier after a long period of quiescence, increases its velocities by up to two orders of magnitude. These surges tend to have complex interactions with tributaries, yet the role of these tributary interactions towards glacier surging has yet to be fully investigated. In this work we construct a synthetic glacier with an adjustable tributary intersection angle to study tributary interaction with the trunk glacier. The geometry we choose is loosely based on the main trunk and tributary interaction of Black Rapids Glacier, AK, USA, which last surged in 1936-1937. We investigate surface elevations, medial moraine locations, and erosive power at the bed of the glacier in response to our adjustable domain and relative flux. A nonlinear relationship between tributary flux and surface elevations is found that indicates flow restrictions can occur with geometries like Black Rapids Glacier. These flow restrictions cause increased ice thicknesses up-glacier which can lead to surges via increased stresses.
    • Interactions Among Climate, Fire, And Vegetation In The Alaskan Boreal Forest

      Duffy, Paul Arthur; Rupp, Scott (2006)
      The boreal forest covers 12 million kM2 of the northern hemisphere and contains roughly 40% of the world's reactive soil carbon. The Northern high latitudes have experienced significant warming over the past century and there is a pressing need to characterize the response of the disturbance regime in the boreal forest to climatic change. The interior Alaskan boreal forest contains approximately 60 million burnable hectares and, relative to the other disturbance mechanisms that exist in Alaska, fire dominates at the landscape-scale. In order to assess the impact of forecast climate change on the structure and function of the Alaskan boreal forest, the interactions among climate, fire and vegetation need to be quantified. The results of this work demonstrate that monthly weather and teleconnection indices explain the majority of observed variability in annual area burned in Alaska from 1950-2003. Human impacts and fire-vegetation interactions likely account for a significant portion of the remaining variability. Analysis of stand age distributions indicate that anthropogenic disturbance in the early 1900's has left a distinct, yet localized impact. Additionally, we analyzed remotely sensed burn severity data to better understand interactions among fire, vegetation and topography. These results show a significant relationship between burn severity and vegetation type in flat landscapes but not in topographically complex landscapes, and collectively strengthen the argument that differential flammability of vegetation plays a significant role in fire-vegetation interactions. These results were used to calibrate a cellular automata model based on the current conceptual model of interactions among weather, fire and vegetation. The model generates spatially explicit maps of simulated stand ages at 1 km resolution across interior Alaska, and output was validated using observed stand age distributions. Analysis of simulation output suggests that significant temporal variability of both the mean and variance of the stand age distribution is an intrinsic property of the stand age distributions of the Alaskan boreal forest. As a consequence of this non-stationarity, we recommend that simulation based methods be used to analyze the impact of forecast climatic change on the structure and function of the Alaskan boreal forest. To assess the impact climate change has on the Alaskan boreal forest, interactions among climate, fire and vegetation were quantified. This work shows that climatic signals exert the dominant influence on area burned. These results inform a simulation model to assess the historical and future states of the Alaskan boreal forest.
    • Interannual and spatial variation in the population genetic composition of young-of-the-year Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes alutus) in Alaskan waters

      Kamin, Lisa M.; Gharrett, Anthony J.; Heifetz, Jonathan; Tallmon, David (2010-05)
      We know little about the population structure of Gulf of Alaska (GOA) and Bering Sea rockfish, including Pacific ocean perch (POP, Sebastes alutus), and early life history information is sparse for many rockfish species. Young-of-the-year (YOY) POP were collected with surface trawls during surveys of juvenile salmon in the GOA and Bering Sea. These samples presented a unique opportunity to study POP genetics and life history. Fourteen microsatellite loci were used to characterize the genetic variation in POP collected in a total of 45 hauls over five years. The coincidence in timing and location of several collections between years allowed examination of both fine- and broad-scale geographic variation (within cohorts) as well as interannual (between cohorts) genetic variation. The geographic genetic structure of these collections was also compared to geographic structure of adult POP described in a previous study (Palof, 2008). As in the adult study, significant broad-scale geographic divergence was observed in YOY POP in the GOA. Fine-scale geographic divergence was also observed and may be the result of variable current regimes and oceanographic features at several locations. The limited amount of temporal variation observed seems to be the result of variable oceanography and fine-scale population structure rather than the influence of a sweepstakes effect. The relationship between genetic divergence and geographic separation is virtually identical in YOY and adult POP, which confirms that dispersal of POP is limited in all life stages and also demonstrates that most YOY are produced by adults that are located nearby.
    • Interannual variability of epibenthic communities in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska

      Powell, Kimberly Keeler; Konar, Brenda; Coyle, Ken; Winsor, Peter (2015-08)
      Epibenthic communities contain a wide range of organisms and serve an important role in marine ecosystems. They are involved in carbon remineralization, benthic production, and are important prey items for higher trophic levels. Arctic epibenthic communities may be experiencing significant changes in species composition, abundance, and biomass at both short and long term time scales. While epibenthic communities may be responding to long term shifts in the environment, differentiating long term trends from short term interannual variation can be problematic. The present study examined interannual differences of epibenthic communities and potential environmental drivers of their variability in the Chukchi Sea. For this, a plumb-staff beam trawl was used to sample epibenthic species composition, abundance, and biomass of the dominant invertebrate taxa at 71 stations around the Chukchi Sea during the ice free seasons of 2009, 2010, 2012, and 2013. Over the entire study area and within a smaller area with the most temporal coverage, the largest separation was between 2009 and 2013, with more difference between 2009 to 2010 than between 2012 and 2013. Crustaceans were the most significant contributors to community composition, based on abundance, and biomass. The important environmental drivers that varied along with the epibenthic community in some but not all years included bottom water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, mean sediment chlorophyll a, and sediment organic matter. In contrast, sediment grain size was important in all years and, therefore, was the least likely to contribute to the biological variability among years. While these data provide a benchmark on interannual variability of epibenthic communities in the Chukchi Sea, more monitoring is essential to determine long term trends.
    • Interannual variations in the carbon to chlorophyll a ratios during the spring bloom in Prince William Sound, Alaska

      Tamburello, Kathereen Rachel (2005-05)
      The carbon to chlorophyll a ratio of phytoplankton during the spring bloom in Prince William Sound, Alaska was investigated for 3 seasons and related to major physical and chemical variables. Carbon to chlorophyll a ratios (C:Chl) were determined by two methods, based on particulate organic carbon to chlorophyll (POC:Chl) and phytoplankton cell carbon to chlorophyll (PCC:Chl). These ratios were compared to a more commonly used estimate, a fixed ratio of C:Chl, taken from literature, for the spring phytoplankton community. The hypothesis that the C:Chl ratios were significantly different between years was proven false. This research indicates that the C:Chl ratio is primarily determined by species composition of the phytoplankton community rather than external factors such as nutrients, temperature or salinity. In addition, this research indicates that the identification and enumeration method, although rarely used because it is the most time and labor intensive method, provides the best estimate of phytoplankton carbon. The mean PCC:Chl ratio for all three years was 18, and is the best fixed ratio to estimate spring phytoplankton carbon in Prince William Sound when an EI Niño is not present.
    • Intercultural mentoring: how international students identify and foster key socialization relationships

      Rossi, Elizabeth A.; Taylor, Karen M.; Richey, Jean A.; DeCaro, Peter A. (2014-05)
      Mentoring is a widely studied relationship because of the critical job it serves for socialization and integration into the university system. Mentoring relationships can serve as sources of academic, social, and emotional support. Support while adapting to a new environment can heighten overall satisfaction an individual feels as well as increase the individual's overall success. Mentoring for domestic students entering the university is clearly valuable, but becomes more complex for international students. Intercultural communication is an interaction that takes place between individuals or groups who are from different cultural backgrounds. Understanding how diverse our world is can bring better awareness to all who come to the university for learning and teaching. Also, understanding how exchange students from dissimilar countries maneuver throughout the socialization process and how mentors helped can allow organizations to encourage mentoring of international students. This understanding can help faculty and administrators formulate a process where exchange students can rapidly move through the socialization process and become integrated members of the organization. Although extant research has investigated the ways mentorship can be a helpful resource for newcomers in expediting the socialization process, this particular study looks at how those key relationships were identified and transformed over time. The scope of this research offers the University of Alaska a better understanding of different types of mentors and how they help international students. It also shows how mentorship bonds are formed and maintained over time between individuals who are from different cultural backgrounds.
    • Interdisciplinary assessment of the skate fishery in the Gulf of Alaska

      Farrugia, Thomas J.; Seitz, Andrew C.; Kruse, Gordon H.; Criddle, Keith R.; Goldman, Kenneth J.; Tribuzio, Cindy A. (2017-12)
      Skates are common bottom-dwelling fishes and valuable non-target species in Gulf of Alaska fisheries. Although there is little demand for skates in the United States, markets in Europe and Asia are fueling desires for additional fishing opportunities on skates in Alaska. Management agencies, however, have been hesitant to allow increased harvests due to the lack of information on the ecology and population dynamics of skates, and the bioeconomics of skate fisheries. Specifically focusing on the two most commonly landedskate species in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA), the big skate (Beringraja binoculata) and the longnose skate (Raja rhina), I conducted an interdisciplinary project to address these knowledge gaps. First, I advanced our understanding of the movement patterns and habitat use of skates by satellite tagging big skates in the GOA. The results show that big skates can, and likely frequently do, travel long distances, cross management boundaries within the GOA, and spend more time in deeper waters than previously thought. Second, I used the insights from the movement study to develop the first stock assessment models for skates in the GOA. This represents an important improvement in modeling, laying the groundwork for the North Pacific Fishery Management Council to move from Tier 5 (more data limited) to Tier 3 (less data limited) harvest control rules, which should lead to increased confidence with which the total allowable catch (TAC) for skates is set. Finally, I used the sustainable harvest estimates from the stock assessment models to develop a model that examined the impacts of management decisions on the profitability of skate fishing. My research provides essential information about these understudied fishes, helping to improve the sustainability and profitability of skate harvests. Incorporation of best available science regarding skate ecology, population dynamics, and bioeconomics into fishery management fosters more responsible development of skate fisheries, sustainable fishery revenues, and employment, and reduces the risk of overfishing, stock collapse, and prolonged fishery closures. It is my hope that fishery management agencies and the fishing industry make use of the new information and insights presented in this dissertation to work collaboratively towards the responsible development of skate fisheries.
    • Interferometric modification of the Lockheed Martin PSTAR system to facilitate three dimensional airspace surveillance

      Otterbacher, Scott E. (2011-05)
      The Lockheed Martin PSTAR is a monostatic radar system that provides range, azimuth, and radial velocity information of detected targets. While this system is useful for airspace surveillance in remote locations due to its portability and durability, it lacks the ability to record target information and the ability to estimate target elevation angle, resulting in a vertical arc of possible target locations. Due to a desire to use the PSTAR for applications that require logging three-dimensional target information, a spatial interferometric modification has been implemented. The PSTAR estimates range from pulse propagation delay and azimuth angle from the orientation of the antenna on a rotating pedestal. Two PSTAR antennas were removed from their housings and mounted, vertically separated, in a custom enclosure allowing for the estimation of elevation angle through spatial interferometry. The reflected signal is received by both antennas, mixed to baseband, and then the two pairs of I/Q channels are simultaneously sampled at 1 MS/s. Target elevation angle is estimated by determining the phase difference of the target's reflection received by the two vertically spaced antennas. Range, azimuth, and radial velocity are also estimated. All data collection was implemented in LabVIEW and data post-processing was implemented in MATLAB.
    • Intermittent hypercapnia induces long-lasting ventilatory plasticity to enhance CO₂ responsiveness to overcome dysfunction

      Mosher, Bryan Patrick; Harris, Michael B.; Taylor, Barbara E.; Hueffer, Karsten; Edmonds, Brian W. (2014-05)
      The ability of the brain to detect (central CO₂ chemosensitivity) and respond to (central CO₂ chemoresponsiveness) changes in tissue CO₂/pH, is a homeostatic process essential for mammalian life. Dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) mechanisms compromises ventilator CO₂ chemosensitivity/responsiveness and may enhance vulnerability to pathologies such as the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The laboratory of Dr. Michael Harris has shown medullary raphe' contributions to central chemosensitivity involving both 5-HT- and y-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated mechanisms. I tested the hypothesis that postnatal exposure to mild intermittent hypercapnia (IHc) induces respiratory plasticity, due in part to strengthening of bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms (GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists respectively). Rats were exposed to IHc-pretreatment (8 cycles of 5 % CO₂) for 5 days beginning at postnatal day 12 (P12). I subsequently assessed CO₂ responsiveness using an in situ perfused brainstem preparation. Hypercapnic responses were determined with and without pharmacological manipulation. In addition, IHc-pretreatment effectiveness was tested for its ability to overcome dysfunction in the CO₂ responsiveness induced by a dietary tryptophan restriction. This dysfunctional CO₂ responsiveness has been suggested to arise from a chronic, partial 5-HT reduction imparted by the dietary restriction. Results show IHc-pretreatment induced plasticity sufficient for CO₂ responsiveness despite removal of otherwise critical ketanserin-sensitive mechanisms. CO₂ responsiveness following IHc-pretreatment was absent if ketanserin was combined with bicuculline and saclofen, indicating that the plasticity was dependent upon bicuculline- and saclofen-sensitive mechanisms. IHc-induced plasticity was also capable of overcoming the ventilatory defects associated with maternal dietary restriction. Duration of IHc-induced plasticity was also investigated and found to last far into life (up to P65). Furthermore, I performed experiments to investigate if IHc-induced plasticity was more robust at a specific developmental period. No such critical period was identified as IHc-pretreatment induced robust respiratory plasticity when administered at all developmental periods tested (P12-16, P21-25 and P36-40). I propose that IHc-induced plasticity may be able to reduce the severity of reflex dysfunctions underlying pathologies such as SIDS.