• Descriptive Analysis of Assaults in Domestic Violence Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 2004

      Rivera, Marny; Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine; The Alaska Department of Law; The Alaska State Troopers (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2008)
      This project examined the characteristics of assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers. Assaults are only one type of criminal offense defined in Alaska statutes as a crime involving domestic violence. This report is not inclusive of all crimes involving domestic violence reported to AST, because it only includes assaults. In addition, this report is not inclusive of assaults in domestic violence incidents that were reported to municipal police departments across Alaska. Only assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST are described in this report. The term assault will be used throughout this report to define assault cases that are crimes involving domestic violence incidents; this includes felony and misdemeanor assaults. The sample utilized for this analysis included all assaults in domestic violence incidents reported to AST in 2004. It included information from 1,281 reports on 1,803 assault charges, 1,356 suspects, 1,523 victims, and 1,283 witnesses. This descriptive analysis documents the characteristics of these reports, charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions.
    • Descriptive Analysis of Stalking Incidents Reported to Alaska State Troopers: 1994-2005

      Rosay, André B.; Wood, Darryl S.; Postle, Greg; TePas, Katherine (University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center, 2007-02-01)
      This project examined the characteristics of stalking incidents reported to the Alaska State Troopers from 1994 to 2005. It included information from 210 reports, 222 charges, 211 suspects, 216 victims, and 246 witnesses. For those stalking incidents reported from 1999 to 2004, the charges, suspects, victims, witnesses, and legal resolutions are documented.
    • Intimate Partner Violence Against Ahtna (Alaska Native) Women in the Copper River Basin

      Magen, Randy H.; Wood, Darryl S. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2006-07)
      This study examined the frequency, severity, and consequences of intimate partner violence against an availability sample of Athabaskan women (n=91) residing in the interior of Alaska. Data about victimization experiences as well as cultural involvement, residential mobility, living arrangements, social cohesion, alcohol use, and post-traumatic stress were gathered through interviews. Slightly less than two-thirds of respondents (63.7%) reported intimate partner violence victimization at some point in their lifetime. Nearly one out of five women surveyed (17.6%) reported that they had been physically assaulted by an intimate partner in the most recent 12 months. Intimate partner victimization was more prevalant and more frequent when compared to what has been reported by the National Violence Against Women Survey.
    • Prison Anger Reduction Programs Evaluation Development Project

      Schafer, N. E.; Barnes, Allan R. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1985-07-31)
      This report describes efforts to develop Alaska-specific norms for the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), using the Megargee offender classification system, for use in program evaluations in Alaska correctional facilities, specifically for evaluation of three pilot anger reduction programs initiated at Alaska Department of Corrections institutions in late 1984/early 1985: (1) Women in Crisis (at Fairbanks Correctional Center); (2) M. E. N., Inc. (at Lemon Creek Correctional Center, Juneau); (3) Bering Sea Women's Group (at Nome Correctional Center). The report provides assessments of the three programs and the correctional centers where they were held and makes recommendations for completing the development of Alaska-specific MMPI-based norms and for the administration of the MMPI as pre- and post-test for measuring psychological changes — particularly in hostility/frustration levels — in participants in anger reduction programs.
    • Project Evaluation: Tundra Women's Coalition (Bethel), A.W.A.I.C. (Anchorage), Male Awareness Project (Anchorage), Kodiak Women's Resource Center and Kodiak Police Department (Kodiak)

      Conn, Stephen; Barry, Douglas; O'Tierney, Daniel (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1979-11-30)
      This report presents evaluations of three Alaska agencies that deal with domestic violence: Tundra Women's Coalition in Bethel, through its Family Violence Program; Abused Women's Aid in Crisis (AWAIC) in Anchorage, through its programs for battered women as well as its Male Awareness Program; and Kodiak Women's Resource Center, including its relationship to Kodiak Police Department.
    • Teens Acting Against Violence (TAAV) Program Evaluation

      Parker, Khristy; Rosay, André B.; DeWitt, Michelle; Arnold, Eileen (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2015-10)
      Teens Acting Against Violence (TAAV) is a violence prevention and youth empowerment program at the Tundra Women’s Coalition (TWC) for teenagers living in Bethel, Alaska. Participation is voluntary and open for any interested teens aged 12-18. TWC and TAAV partnered with the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Justice Center to conduct an evaluation of the TAAV program through a one-time survey of former and current adult members (over 18 years of age) of TAAV. Pursuant to TAAV objectives, the focus of the evaluation was placed on examining efforts in the areas of domestic violence and sexual assault prevention, building healthy relationships, encouraging sobriety, and suicide prevention.
    • Violence against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

      Rosay, André B. (U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, 2016-05)
      This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.