• Curriculum Relationships within the University of Alaska, Anchorage: A Report on the School of Justice

      Havelock, John E. (Justice Center, School of Justice, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1983-12)
      This report, commissioned by the Office of Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, is a preliminary inquiry into the relationship that the curriculum of the School of Justice bears to the curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences and the other schools of UAA. In particular, the inquiry was initiated to identify "service course" needs of the College of Arts and Sciences and other Schools of the University, that might be met by the Justice faculty and the extent to which other units of the University meet the "service" needs of the School of Justice.
    • An Examination of Specialized Training Grants Funded by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency 1973 through 1975

      Endell, Roger V. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08)
      Prior to the establishment of the Criminal Justice Center at the University of Alaska, no program has attempted to train and educate Alaska justice practitioners on a continuing basis and at all agency levels. The Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, through the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, has attempted to deal with this training problem on an interim basement through the Specialized Training Grant program, which enables "state and local police officers, correctional officers, prosecutors, public defenders, and court personnel [to obtain] specialized training sponsored by other agencies and institutions," often involving travel out-of-state for programs largely unavailable in Alaska. This study examines individualized grants funded for the years 1973–1975 as a means of measuring the effectiveness of the Specialized Training Grant program as on approach to the continuing professionalization of Alaska's criminal justice personnel.
    • Fisheries Law and Enforcement

      Havelock, John E.; Barber, Joe; Moras, Antonia (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1982-09)
      This text provides a general introduction to the laws, agencies, and issues involved in fisheries regulation, particularly in Alaska, originally intended for an introductory course on regulation as part of an extensive curriculum in fisheries at Kodiak Community College, University of Alaska. The text covers international, federal, and Alaska fisheries law through 1982; the history of fisheries and fisheries law in Alaska; federal, Alaska, and local agencies which affect fisheries; and the justice system, law enforcement practice, and individual rights within the maritime context.
    • Human Resources, Training and Education: A Survey of Alaska Criminal Justice Agencies

      Ring, Peter Smith (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-09)
      This report presents results of a survey of Alaska criminal justice agencies. The survey was designed to provide baseline data on the educational levels of criminal justice personnel and existing training programs in Alaska; and to elicit from criminal justice agencies their views on subject areas — both in higher education programs and in continuing professional development programs — which those agencies believed deserved attention. A total of 47 agencies, offices, institutions within agencies, and individuals responded to the survey, out of a total of 78 to whom surveys were sent. Respondents represented the law enforcement agencies, the Alaska Court System, the Alaska Department of Law, the Alaska Public Defender, and correctional agencies including probation/parole.
    • Justice Higher Education at the University of Alaska: A Curriculum Study

      Angell, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1978-06)
      The University of Alaska has been offering courses in police and correctional subjects since the mid-1960s. The University's entrance into this justice field was to take advantaqe of program opportunities rather than to develop comprehensive academic programs, and consequently the curriculum has developed incrementally — a course at a time. The Criminal Justice Center [later the Justice Center] was established in 1975 to oversee and coordinate the University's efforts in the field of justice. One of the top priorities identified by the Center was the reorganization of undergraduate curriculum offered by the University in justice fields. This document contains the materials developed as a basis for the curriculum planning. Original drafts of each of the chapters of this report were reviewed by a Curriculum Advisory Committee comprising all full-time faculty in the University of Alaska's justice programs during the 1976–1977 acacdemic year, representatives of UA faculty from related fields, and experts on justice higher education from outside the state. This group endorsed (1) philosophy and goals for University of Alaska justice programs, (2) a justice curriculum design for the University, and (3) the essentials of the basic standards for University's justice programs. The goals and curriculum prepared as a result of this project were processed through the University's academic system and approved by the University's Committee on Academic Policy in May of 1977, making these goals and curriculum models officially the basic policy of the University in the area of Justice academic programs. Proposed standards awaited statewide University of Alaska approval at the time of the report.
    • Law Related Education Project: Final Report

      Balnave, Richard (Criminal Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1976-08-11)
      This report describes a cooperative project beween Anchorage School District (ASD) and the Criminal Justice Center at University of Alaska, Anchorage, to develop a law-related curriculum for 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th-grade classrooms. The pilot program was implemented in March through June 1976 in 20 ASD classrooms with approximately 800 children. The curriculum used was the "Law in Action" series by Linda Riekes and Sally Mahe Ackerly (West Publishing Company, 1975), using the units on "Lawmaking" (5th grade), "Youth Attitudes and the Police" (6th grade), "Courts and Trials" (7th grade), and "Juvenile Problems and the Law" (8th grade). Feedback from the pilot program led to the writing of supplementary teacher's manuals for each of the four units, reflecting improvements to the original lessons, supplementary classroom activities, supplementary media, and inclusion of Alaska-specific content such as Alaska laws and community resources. Complete "classroom kits" were deposited in ASD's Instructional Materials Center for continued use by ASD teachers interested in providing legal and justice education to their students.
    • The Public's Perspective— Justice Administration 1980: A Survey of Public Opinion

      Havelock, John E.; Ring, Peter Smith; Bruce, Kevin (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-08)
      This public opinion survey was commissioned by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, to help people interested in justice administration in planning, predicting, and educating with respect to the future design and administration of the justice system in Alaska. The survey was conducted during November and December 1979 and included 676 respondents from throughout Alaska. The survey elicited public opinion in four major areas: (1) the climate of public safety, including perceptions of crime rates, public safety, gun ownership, victimization, and family violence; (2) images of the justice professional, including professional skills, professionalism, educational qualifications, discretionary judgments, and discriminatory practices; (3) changes in the law, including the role of public opinion in revision of law, strictness and leniency of laws, perceptions of revisions (including recent revisions in sentencing, the Alaska criminal code, alcohol regulations, and drug laws), perceptions of laws relating to alcohol, marijuana, and other drugs, criminality of gambling and sex offenses, and election of justice officials; and (4) public attitudes toward selected decisions regarding the administration of justice, including law enforcement and corrections priorities, justice services in rural Alaska, consolidation of public safety services, police use of firearms, sentencing, and public education in justice.
    • Report on the Clerkship Program

      Havelock, John E. (Criminal Justice Center, Office of Legal Studies, University of Alaska, Anchorage, 1977-02-15)
      There is no law school in Alaska. In 1976, the Alaska legislature adopted Chapter 181, SLA 1976 which proyides that an eligible person who completes one year of law school and subsequently successfully pursues a three year course of law study in a clerkship program may be admitted to the practice of law upon taking and passing the bar examination administered by the Alaska Bar Association. The Act placed upon the Alaska Supreme Court the responsibility for administering the clerkship program and prescribing the course of law study. The Alaska Supreme Court contracted with the Criminal Justice Center to design a law clerkship program, including a system for registering law clerks and supervising attorneys, a basic curriculum, and other elements of the program. The report proposes guidelines for sound administration of an educational program conducted outside direct academic supervision, discusses budget issues, and proposes a new bill to amend the statute as first passed.
    • Seven Years of Individualized Training: An Examination of Specialized Training Grants Funded by the Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, 1973 through 1979

      Endell, Roger V. (Justice Center, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1980-04-15)
      Prior to the establishment of the Criminal Justice Center at the University of Alaska (renamed the Justice Center in 1979), no program has attempted to train and educate Alaska justice practitioners on a continuing basis and at all agency levels. The Alaska Criminal Justice Planning Agency, through the Governor's Commission on the Administration of Justice, has attempted to deal with this training problem on an interim basement through the Specialized Training Grant program, which enables "state and local police officers, correctional officers, prosecutors, public defenders, and court personnel [to obtain] specialized training sponsored by other agencies and institutions," often involving travel out-of-state for programs largely unavailable in Alaska. This study examines individualized grants funded for the years 1973–1979 as a means of measuring the effectiveness of the Specialized Training Grant program as on approach to the continuing professionalization of Alaska's criminal justice personnel.