Recent Submissions

  • Alaska's Unique Economic Structure and Fiscal Challenges

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1999)
    This presentation is a part of the series of publications and presentations developed as part of the Understanding Alaska project. It covers topics such as the structure of the economy, recent economic history, population trends, future projections, state and local finances and the economic regions of Alaska. Contains many graphical presentations of data available at the time of publication.
  • Commercial Fishing Safety Record: A National Perspective

    Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1992)
    Commercial fishing safety is an important problem in Alaska. The kinds of problems which exist differ for different fisheries in Alaska - safety problems in the Bering Sea crab fishery are different than those in the southeast troll fishery. This makes it more difficult to define the nature of the Alaska commercial fishing safety problem or to figure out how to deal with it. The same things are true at the national level. Commercial fishing safety is an important problem throughout the United States. The safety problems in the Gulf of Mexico shrimp fisheries are different from those in Alaska fisheries. These kinds of differences contribute to the difficulty of defining or addressing the commercial fishing safety problem at the national level. This presentation reviews elements of a report entitled Fishing Vessel Safety: Blueprint for a National Program to provide a picture of what emerged in its exploration of safety problems at the national level. All of the data and graphs are from the committee's report, except some additional data for Alaska. Any opinions expressed are the presenters, not the committee's or the authors of the original report. Presented at the National Fishing Industry Safety and Health Workshop in Anchorage, Alaska on October 9, 1992
  • How North Slope Oil Has Transformed Alaska's Economy (Presentations)

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2008)
    This presentation was delivered to the 4th Annual Oil and Gas Symposium in Anchorage, Alaska. It provides charts and graphical information on the contribution of North Slope oil to the national and state economy.
  • The Alaska Economy Report Card 2007 (Presentation)

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
    This presentation was delivered to the State of Alaska House Resources Committee on October 25, 2007, and includes charts and graphical information as support to subjects related to the state of the Alaskan economy: • The Structure of the Economy—1/3 Rule • Growth Since 1980 • Looking Ahead • Resource Curse • A Non-Problem • The Many Alaska Economies • Population Bubbles
  • Federal Spending in Alaska (Presentation)

    Goldsmith, Scott; Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
    This presentation is a part of the Understanding Alaska research series. It includes charts and other graphical information on federal spending in Alaska. Key points include defense spending and procurment, civilian industry spending and procurement, and direct payments to individuals (social security, federal retirement, medicare, housing assistance and veterans benefits). This material was presented at the conference on “Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs,” May, 5-6, 2003, Anchorage, Alaska
  • Older Americans Month (Presentation)

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
    This presentation includes charts and graphical information regarding older people in Alaska. Presented at the Anchorage Senior Center.
  • Integrated Village Energy Systems for Remote Alaska (Presentation)

    Gilbert, Steve; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
    Serving the integrated energy needs of a remote Alaska community with alternative primary energy offers significantly different opportunities and challenges than simply serving the “electricity” needs. How to meet these demands during How to meet these demands during the medium term (10 the medium term (10 -15 years)? Wind-Hydrogen hybrid, local methane source and geothermal are examined in this research.
  • Energy Flow in Alaska (Presentation)

    Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
    This presentation was delivered at the AEA Rural Energy Conference in September 2005. It provides an overview of how energy provides goods and services when turned into electricity, and how Alaska's energy is disposed.
  • Anchorage in the 21st Century: More Diversity, More Complexity, More Challenging (Presentation)

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
    This presentation includes charts and graphical information regarding economic, demographic, and social patterns for Alaska, with a focus on Anchorage. Presented at 3rd Anchorage School District Conference on Personalizing Education
  • Alaska Native Population Basics (Presentation)

    Howe, Lance; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
    This presentation was delivered at the conference on Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs in Anchorage on the 5th of May, 2003. It includes charts and graphical information on Alaska Native demographics.
  • The Effects of State Revenue Options on Alaska Households (Understanding Taxes)

    Haley, Sharman (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
    This presentation discusses how various options for raising additional state revenue would affect Alaska households. We’ll start with a little history about state spending and explain why there is a state budget deficit, often called the “fiscal gap.” Then we’ll briefly describe all the options for dealing with the fiscal gap, but focus the rest of the talk on the big ticket items: using permanent fund earnings and establishing state sales or income taxes.
  • Alaska Salmon Management Economic, Social, Political Complexity

    Ulmer, Fran (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
    Alaska’s seafood industry is world-scale. The value of fish harvests was about $900 million in 2001. About $1.3 billion in value was added in fish processing. The seafood industry is particularly important for rural Alaska. Fishing is the most important source of income, taxes, infrastructure and utilities for coastal communities--and an important part of Alaska culture. However, many fishermen and the majority of fish processing workers are non-residents, and most of the large companies in the seafood industry are based outside Alaska. Alaska salmon are harvested in 27 different limited entry fisheries.These fisheries differ widely in gear type, species harvested, volume harvested, values of harvest, number of permit holders, average earnings and average permit value—and in how well or poorly the management system is working. This presentation explores aspects of Alaska's history, constitution, statutes, and state regulatory bodies in the management system (state water jurisdiction). Presentation to UAA Environmental Economics and Policy Class
  • Polar Politics: The Marriage of Scientists, Stakeholders and Policymakers, a presentation

    Ulmer, Fran (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
    The Arctic is a complex integrated system of natural, physical and social domains inextricably connected to the larger global system. Our goal is to develop partnerships and innovations to transcend disciplinary, geographical, political and mission-related boundaries. This is important for many reasons, including the complexity of the issues, scarce resources, agency budget constraints, and rapidly changing systems. This presentation explores key questions including How can scientists better communicate their research so stakeholders and policymakers understand it? How can we make it easier (and more desirable) for policymakers and stakeholders to use that research to improve decisions? How can we make science that is relevant to policymakers and stakeholders more interesting to the scientific establishment ?
  • Graduates of Alaska's Teacher Preparation Programs-Where Are They Now?

    Hill, Alexandra (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2007)
    This presentation includes a review of the sources of data, and presents preliminary findings on graduates of initial certification programs in Alaska. It's purpose was to collect feedback on what analyses to add, refine, and revise. Data is presented in a series of charts and graphs with interpretations. We matched teacher program graduation data with Department of Labor data on Permanent Fund Dividend applications – a proxy for Alaska residence. Most people are eligible for a PFD by the time they complete a teacher preparation program here, so we looked at graduates who completed their programs between 2001 and 2003, and PFD applications from 2003 to 2005. Only 10% did not apply for a PFD in 2003,. We expected that number to rise if teachers moved out of state. Teachers who leave Alaska schools but remain in Alaska continue to apply for the PFD; those who don’t apply have probably left the state. By 2005, 16% no longer applied for a PFD and were probably no longer in Alaska. Further information is available in a summary and full report with a similar title.
  • Alaska Seafood Market Changes and Challenges

    Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
    This presentation outlines research identifying changes in Alaska seafood markets. Particular focus is given to the impact of globalization, increased development of aquaculture, marketing challenges, and strategies for more effective marketing. Presented to Alaska Fisheries Marketing Board
  • Change, Challenges, and Opportunities for Wild Fisheries

    Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
    The global seafood industry is in a period of rapid and profound change which is affecting every part of the industry. The key causes of change are the growth of aquaculture and globalization of the world economy. These changes are leading to increased pressure throughout the seafood industry to respond to market demands and increase efficiency. Wild fisheries face significant inherent challenges in competing with aquaculture in an increasingly globalized economy. Aquaculture has far-reaching effects on markets for wild fisheries. Many of these effects are negative, but some are positive. Presented to Conference on Marine Aquaculture: Effects on the West Coast and Alaska Fishing Industry
  • The economic contribution of Southeast Alaska's Nature Based Tourism

    Dugan, Darcy (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
    This presentation provides an overview of initial findings and the design of a research project that examines the potential for nature based tourism in a range of Southeast Alaska communities.
  • Conversions: Rural Alaska Energy Supply Chains

    Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
    This presentation explores three questions regarding electricity issues in Alaska. In answering these questions, the presentation provides data relevant to where electricity is generate, what it costs, and what can be done to reduce costs. Steve Colt presented this material to the Rural Alaska Energy Conference in September 2002.
  • Challenges and Strategies for the Alaska Salmon Industry

    Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
    The salmon industry is very important to Alaska—in particular to coastal communities.The Alaska salmon industry is facing an economic crisis. One cause of the crisis is competition from farmed salmon, which has severely depressed prices for Alaska salmon, however, farmed salmon is only part of the problem: the salmon industryalso faces other major challenges. The salmon industry is experiencing painful adjustments with severe economic and social consequences for Alaska.There isn’t any way to avoid painful adjustment. The issue is how best to create the conditions for a more profitable industry. This presentation provides an overview of the many complexities of the situation facing the industry in 2002.
  • Alaska Demographic, Economic, and Social Trends

    Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
    This presentation outlines key developments in Alaska's development and potential directions for future development based on demographic, economic and social trends. At statehood the economy was dominated by the federal government, but today, at least in the larger communities, it looks surprisingly like the rest of the US. Booms and busts have and continue to exert a strong influence on the economy, particularly on regional economies, in spite of this maturation. The Petroleum Cycle has been the single most important economic event since statehood. Oil with a market value of about $250 billion has been produced from the NS. Production peaked in the late 1980s and the price peaked at $60 (NS delivered to the lower 48) in the early 1980s. We have had our share of happy events ranging from high oil prices when production was high to a high flying stock market when we had a Permanent Fund to invest, to a powerful congressional delegation when Washington had $$ to distribute. Now that we look more like the rest of the US and economic growth has slowed, we can should take stock of where we are. There are a number of surprises.

View more