• What do we know about the Alaska economy and where is it heading?

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/2017)
    • What do we know about Narcan Utilization among Alaskans? Findings from 3 years

      Porter, Rebecca; Druffel, Ryan; Hanson, Bridget (Center for Behavioral Health Research & Services, 1/22/2020)
    • Opioid prevention: Is it working for young adults?

      Barnett, Jodi; Richie, Andrew; Hanson, Bridget (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/22/2020)
    • Institutional Change, Transactions Costs and Fisheries Reform: Two Illustrations from New Zealand

      Towsend, Ralph (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 10/11/2016)
    • Principles for Managing Fisheries to Facilitate Adaptation to Uncertain Effects of Climate Change

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2007)
    • Budget basics 1975-2021 - Revenues, Agency Operations, and Capital Spending

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/16/2019)
    • What does the future hold for Alaska: Fiscal Planning in the face of uncertainty

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/1/2015)
    • Accessing Permanent Fund Earnings to Reduce the Fiscal Gap

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/1/2016)
      Presented to Alaska Senate State Affairs Committee on February 4, 2016
    • K-12 Funding

      Townsend, Ralph (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 2/21/2019)
    • Alaska Demographic, Economic, and Social Trends

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2001)
      This presentation outlines key developments in Alaska's development and potential directions for future development based on demographic, economic and social trends. At statehood the economy was dominated by the federal government, but today, at least in the larger communities, it looks surprisingly like the rest of the US. Booms and busts have and continue to exert a strong influence on the economy, particularly on regional economies, in spite of this maturation. The Petroleum Cycle has been the single most important economic event since statehood. Oil with a market value of about $250 billion has been produced from the NS. Production peaked in the late 1980s and the price peaked at $60 (NS delivered to the lower 48) in the early 1980s. We have had our share of happy events ranging from high oil prices when production was high to a high flying stock market when we had a Permanent Fund to invest, to a powerful congressional delegation when Washington had $$ to distribute. Now that we look more like the rest of the US and economic growth has slowed, we can should take stock of where we are. There are a number of surprises.
    • Challenges and Strategies for the Alaska Salmon Industry

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
      The salmon industry is very important to Alaska—in particular to coastal communities.The Alaska salmon industry is facing an economic crisis. One cause of the crisis is competition from farmed salmon, which has severely depressed prices for Alaska salmon, however, farmed salmon is only part of the problem: the salmon industryalso faces other major challenges. The salmon industry is experiencing painful adjustments with severe economic and social consequences for Alaska.There isn’t any way to avoid painful adjustment. The issue is how best to create the conditions for a more profitable industry. This presentation provides an overview of the many complexities of the situation facing the industry in 2002.
    • Conversions: Rural Alaska Energy Supply Chains

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2002)
      This presentation explores three questions regarding electricity issues in Alaska. In answering these questions, the presentation provides data relevant to where electricity is generate, what it costs, and what can be done to reduce costs. Steve Colt presented this material to the Rural Alaska Energy Conference in September 2002.
    • Alaska Seafood Market Changes and Challenges

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This presentation outlines research identifying changes in Alaska seafood markets. Particular focus is given to the impact of globalization, increased development of aquaculture, marketing challenges, and strategies for more effective marketing. Presented to Alaska Fisheries Marketing Board
    • Change, Challenges, and Opportunities for Wild Fisheries

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      The global seafood industry is in a period of rapid and profound change which is affecting every part of the industry. The key causes of change are the growth of aquaculture and globalization of the world economy. These changes are leading to increased pressure throughout the seafood industry to respond to market demands and increase efficiency. Wild fisheries face significant inherent challenges in competing with aquaculture in an increasingly globalized economy. Aquaculture has far-reaching effects on markets for wild fisheries. Many of these effects are negative, but some are positive. Presented to Conference on Marine Aquaculture: Effects on the West Coast and Alaska Fishing Industry
    • Alaska Native Population Basics (Presentation)

      Howe, Lance; Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This presentation was delivered at the conference on Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs in Anchorage on the 5th of May, 2003. It includes charts and graphical information on Alaska Native demographics.
    • Federal Spending in Alaska (Presentation)

      Goldsmith, Scott; Larson, Eric (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2003)
      This presentation is a part of the Understanding Alaska research series. It includes charts and other graphical information on federal spending in Alaska. Key points include defense spending and procurment, civilian industry spending and procurement, and direct payments to individuals (social security, federal retirement, medicare, housing assistance and veterans benefits). This material was presented at the conference on “Improving Delivery of Federal Funding for Alaska Tribal Programs,” May, 5-6, 2003, Anchorage, Alaska
    • The economic contribution of Southeast Alaska's Nature Based Tourism

      Dugan, Darcy (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      This presentation provides an overview of initial findings and the design of a research project that examines the potential for nature based tourism in a range of Southeast Alaska communities.
    • The Effects of State Revenue Options on Alaska Households (Understanding Taxes)

      Haley, Sharman (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      This presentation discusses how various options for raising additional state revenue would affect Alaska households. We’ll start with a little history about state spending and explain why there is a state budget deficit, often called the “fiscal gap.” Then we’ll briefly describe all the options for dealing with the fiscal gap, but focus the rest of the talk on the big ticket items: using permanent fund earnings and establishing state sales or income taxes.
    • Integrated Village Energy Systems for Remote Alaska (Presentation)

      Gilbert, Steve; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2004)
      Serving the integrated energy needs of a remote Alaska community with alternative primary energy offers significantly different opportunities and challenges than simply serving the “electricity” needs. How to meet these demands during How to meet these demands during the medium term (10 the medium term (10 -15 years)? Wind-Hydrogen hybrid, local methane source and geothermal are examined in this research.
    • Energy Flow in Alaska (Presentation)

      Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      This presentation was delivered at the AEA Rural Energy Conference in September 2005. It provides an overview of how energy provides goods and services when turned into electricity, and how Alaska's energy is disposed.