• The Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline: What's It All About?

      Gorsuch, Lee; Tussing, Arlon R.; Persily, Larry; Larsen, Peter; Goldsmith, Scott; Foster, Mark; Fischer, Victor; Colt, Steve; Bradner, Tim; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2005)
      Alaska has collected nearly $100 billion in oil revenues (adjusted to today’s dollars) since it became a state. Almost all those revenues have been from oil produced on the North Slope, where the largest known oil field in the U.S. was discovered in 1968. Construction of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline in the 1970s made development of that oil possible. The North Slope also has one of the largest accumulations of natural gas in the country—and for 30 years Alaskans have been hoping for construction of a second pipeline, to carry that gas to market. Gas pipelines have been proposed at times over the years. But none has been built, because investors did not think it was economic. Now, with higher natural gas prices and changes in the North American market, many people think a gas project may be possible. Alaska stands to gain a ot if a gas pipeline is built—a new long-term source of state revenues; more jobs and increased business activity; an increased local property tax base; and a potential new in-state source of natural gas for home heating, electricity, and industrial uses. With future supplies of natural gas from Cook Inlet uncertain, many Alaskans want one or more “spur” pipelines to be built from the main pipeline, to make natural gas available to Alaska communities. But access to the gas will come at a price, and not all Alaskans will benefit equally.
    • The Case for Strengthening Education in Alaska

      Hill, Alexandra; Gorsuch, Lee; Cravez, Pamela (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 2006)
      Alaska’s public education system has been transformed since Alaska became a state. Opportunities for education have been expanded in many ways and many places. But at every level, from pre-school on up, the education systems in Alaska and the U.S. have serious troubles. Many American children don’t have access to early education; can’t do math and science as well as those in other countries; can’t pass basic reading, writing, and math tests; and don’t finish high school. Boys are less likely than girls to go on to college. And in Alaska, there are fewer early-education programs than nationwide. Elementary and high-school students— especially Alaska Natives and those from low-income families—are falling below U.S. averages. Since statehood, Alaska’s education system has grown and improved enormously. But the remaining challenges are also very big. Alaska has the resources to deal with those challenges, and some efforts are in fact already underway. The question now for all Alaskans—not only educators and parents—is this: how do we come together to create what our state and our children need?
    • A Study of Five Southeast Alaska Communities

      Colt, Steve; Gorsuch, Lee; Smythe, Charles; Garber, Bart K. (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1994)
      The Forest Service of the US Department of Agriculture and the Bureaus of Land Management and Indian Affairs of the US Department of the Interior contracted with the Institute of Social and Economic Research to prepare a report presenting the available, factual evidence on why the five studey communities of Haines, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Tenakee and Wrangell were omitted from ANCSA - and how the historical circumstances and conditions of the study communities compare with those of the Southeast communities that were recognized under ANCSA. The first two chapters ofthe report examine Congress's broad authority to settle aboriginal land claims and the development and application of Congressioal and adminstrative criteria for villages and urban communities recognized under ANCSA. Chapter 3 examines Tlingit and Haida land claims settlement. Chapter 4 assesses similarities and differences in Native population characteristics of the study communities at the time ANSCSA was passed. Chapter 5 describes historical Native use and occuption of the five study communities and of ANCSA communities in Southeast Alaska. Chapter 6 reports how ANSCA enrollment procedures were carried out in both the study communities and the recognized villages and urban communities. Chapter 7 reports on the financial benefits that shareholders of Southeast village and urban corporations have realized over the years, as compared with the benefits the at-large shareholders received. This report is accompanied by four appendices that provide the basis for summaries included in the main report. Appendix A: A History of Occupation and Use, Appendix B: List of Persons Interviewed for Study Community Histories , Appendix C: Citation Database for Chapters 1 and 2 , Appendix D: Comments of Reviewers and Related Documents