• Human Dimensions of the Arctic System: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Dynamics of Social Environment Relationships

      Huntington, Henry; Berman, Matthew; Cooper, Lee W.; Hamilton, Larry; Hinzman, Larry; Kielland, Knut; Kirk, Elizabeth; Kruse, Jack; Lynch, Amanda; McGuire, A. David; et al. (National Science Foundation, 200)
      In 1997 the National Science Foundation Arctic System Science (ARCSS) program launched the Human Dimensions of the Arctic System (HARC) initiative. Its goal is to “understand the dynamics of linkages between human populations and the biological and physical environment of the Arctic, at scales ranging from local to global.” ....This section describes several HARC projects to give an idea of the scope of the initiative and the breadth of inquiry that has so far been undertaken.
    • 2011 Denali National Park and Preserve Visit Characteristics

      Fix, Peter; Ackerman, Andrew; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/13)
    • Estimating Visits to Denali National Park and Preserve

      Fix, Peter; Ackerman, Andrew; Fay, Ginny (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/13)
    • Migration and Oil Industry Employment of North Slope Alaska Natives

      Marshall, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/1993)
    • Migration and Oil Industry Employment of North Slope Alaska Natives

      Marshall, David (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 1/1/1993)
    • Toward Universal Broadband in Rural Alaska

      Parker, Khristy; Sharp, Suzanne; Hudson, Heather; Spiers, Kent; Wark, Kyle; Hill, Alexandra; Hanna, Virgene (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/12)
    • The Alaska Economy And The Challenge Ahead

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/2015)
    • The Alaska Economy And The Challenge Ahead

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/1/2015)
    • A simple decomposition of Alaska's labor force participation rate

      Guettabi, Mouhcine (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 11/25/2019)
      In Alaska, similar to the rest of the country, the share of people working or seeking employment started declining in the early 2000's. The implications for lower labor force participation rates are numerous and have consequences on the tax base, government revenues, and economic growth. From 2000 to 2010, we find Alaska's labor force declined from 73.5 to 69.6% with more than 90% of the decline attributed to demographic shifts. From 2010 to 2018, the labor force participate rate went from 69.6 to 65% but the reasons for the decline were due to both behavioral adjustments (44.6%) and demographic shifts (55.3%). Lastly, we show that using the unemployment rate as a metric of the economy's health during times of significant labor force change can be misleading.
    • Economic Effects of Climate Change in Alaska

      Berman, Matthew; Schmidt, Jennifer (American Meteorological Society (AMS), 11/27/2018)
      We summarize the potential nature and scope of economic effects of climate change in Alaska that have already occurred and are likely to become manifest over the next 30-50 years. We classified potential effects discussed in the literature into categories according to climate driver, type of environmental service affected, certainty and timing of the effects, and potential magnitude of economic consequences. We then described the nature of important economic effects, and provided estimates of larger, more certain effects for which data were available. Largest economic effects were associated with costs to prevent damage, relocate, and replace infrastructure threatened by permafrost thaw, sea level rise, and coastal erosion. The costs to infrastructure were offset by a large projected reduction in space heating costs attributable to milder winters. Overall, we estimated that five, relatively certain, large effects that could be readily quantified would impose an annual net cost of $340-$700 million, or 0.6 to 1.3 percent of Alaska GDP. This significant, but relatively modest net economic effect for Alaska as a whole obscures large regional disparities, as rural communities face large projected costs while more southerly urban residents experience net gains.
    • Alaska's Economy and Housing Market

      Goldsmith, Scott; Berman, Matthew; Huskey, Lee; Leask, Linda; Hull, Teresa (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/1986)
    • Repeat Maltreatment in Alaska: Assessment and Exploration of Alternative Measures

      Passini, Jessica; Vadapalli, Diwakar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Unlocking our Petroleum Wealth Potential: A Game Plan for Meeting Alaska's Fiscal Challenge

      Goldsmith, Scott (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/1/2015)
    • Local Knowledge and Science: Observation of Landscape Change in the Nuiqsut Homelands

      Schmidt, Jennifer; Kofinas, Gary (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 12/19/2018)
    • Better Times in Alaska

      Hill, Alexandra; Leask, Linda; Berman, Matthew (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      The Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) has tracked the economic health of Anchorage households since 1987, when the recession that followed the oil price crash was at its worst. In our most recent survey we also questioned residents of Fairbanks and the Mat-Su Borough. This publication compares conditions in the three survey places in early 1990, and describes trends in Anchorage over the past three years. We asked Alaskans about their jobs, incomes, home equity, plans to move, and expectations for the coming year. We end with a snapshot glance of survey households in 1990. That brief discussion simply provides useful basic information on households in the three survey places at the start of the decade.
    • Electric Load Forecast for Ketchikan, Metlakatla, Petersburg, and Wrangell, 1990-2010

      Hull, Teresa; Goldsmith, Scott; Colt, Steve (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      The study area is composed of the Alaskan communities of Ketchikan, Metlakatla, Petersburg, and Wrangell. In this report we call the area Lower Southeast Alaska (LSE). Like that of Southeast Alaska as a whole, the LSE economy is built on timber (logging, lumber, and pulp), fishing, and tourism. Hard rock mining is an emerging but still relatively unimportant basic sector. Although the region has felt the positive effects of the statewide oil boom through increased construction of public buildings and government employment at all levels, it is far less reliant on the petroleum industry than is the rest of the state. Instead, the people of Southeast Alaska are heavily exposed to swings in the world market prices of wood and fish products. The tourism industry has been growing steadily. This report provides information and scenarios for projections of electricity usage for these communities.
    • Subsistence Use of Renewable Resources by Rural Residents of Southeast Alaska

      Kruse, Jack; Muth, Robert (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      The Tongass Resource Use Cooperative Survey consists of 1,465 interviews conducted in 30 southeast Alaska communities between October 1, 1987, andMarch 13, 1988. The study was directed by the Institute of Social and Economic Research of the University of Alaska Anchorage. All permanent communities, with the exception of Juneau and Ketchikan, were included in the study. The purpose of this report is to describe the extent of harvest and distribution of renewable natural resources by rural southeast Alaska residents. Eighty-five percent of all households surveyed harvest one or more species of fish, wildlife, or plants. Such resources include deer, salmon, halibut, and other(non-salmon) fin fish, crab, shrimp, clams, other invertebrates, ducks, bear, harbor seal, berries, firewood, and other resources. Forty-one percent of all households report that at least 25 percent of the meat and fish they eat comes from resources harvested by members of their own households or is given to them by family or friends.
    • The Economic Impact of Amateur Sports in Alaska

      Hill, Pershing; Sean, Noble (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1990)
      Amateur sports events and competitions can generate significant net economic benefits for host economies. The major impact of amateur sports on the local and regional economy is an increase in the amenity values enjoyed by the citizenry. Amateur sports provide a wider variety of experiences for the population; sports programs and competitions improve the quality of life. In addition to the amenity value increases, being the venue for amateur sports competitions brings additional spending into the local economy. For instance, it is estimated that the Great Alaska Shootout could be responsible for as much as $300,000 of additional spending into the Anchorage economy. This additional spending is added to the income of the local economy and generates subsequent levels of spending. Based on assumptions about the number of visitors and the additional spending that takes place as a result of these competitions and the value of the multiplier process it is possible to estimate their net economic on the economy. This report concludes that there are a number of ways that the public sector could support local organizations and the economic benefits that arise from amateur sports events and competitions.