• Alaska Salmon Markets and Prices

      Knapp, Gunnar (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1992)
      Since 1988, Alaska salmon fishermen have watched the bottom drop out of salmon prices. Between 1988 and 1991, the average price Alaska fishermen received for sockeye salmon fell from $2.35 per pound to $. 77 per pound, and the average price of pink salmon fell from 79 cents per pound to 13 cents per pound. The bust in salmon prices followed an equally dramatic boom in prices between 1985 and 1988. What caused the boom and bust in salmon prices, and what lies ahead for the Alaska salmon industry? This report addresses these questions, and provides basic data needed for informed discussion of policy issues related to salmon prices and markets. This report is part of a series of papers and workshops intended to provide information and encourage fishermen and others to work together to improve the salmon market.
    • Alaska Seafood Industry: Seafood Sector Report and Summary

      Knapp, Gunnar; Smith, Terrence (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1991)
      The Alaska Seafood Industry Sector Report is a comprehensive review of Alaska's seafood harvesting and processing industry through the decade of the 1980s. This report provides an overview of the seafood industry in Alaska. We present basic information on fish and shellfish harvesting, processing,fisheries markets,seafood industry employment and income, publicrevenues and expenditures in support of fisheries,and product prices. Included under eachof these topics are separate data and discussion for salmon, shellfish, herring, halibut and bottornfish. The data presented focus on the last ten years of the fisheries,that is,1980-1989.
    • Alaska Timber Harvest and Production - 1994

      Hill, Alexandra; Hull, Dan (Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska., 1995)
      Alaska's richest timber resource is its coastal forest, a narrow band of temperate rain forest extending from the southern border of the state north and west to Kodiak Island. Sitka spruce is a major component of this forest, with western hemlock in the southeastern area, replaced by mountain hemlock west of Prince William Sound. This report tries to provide regular and timely information about the timber and wood products industry. It includes data for the entire state and for three regions within the state, and brings together previously available data on public timber harvests and wood products exports, as well as new estimates of private timber harvests. We hope the data will be useful for both public and private planning efforts, as well as informed policy debate over timber management and development of the forest products industry.